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I realise that there are posts on the topic of B-Splines on this board but those have actually made me more confused so I thought someone might be able to help me.

I have simulated data for x-values ranging from 0 to 1. I'd like to fit to my data a cubic spline (degree = 3) with knots at 0, 0.1, 0.2, ... , 0.9, 1. I'd also like to use the B-Spline basis and OLS for parameter estimation (I'm not looking for penalised splines).

I think I need the BS function but I'm not quite sure and I also don't know what exactly to feed it.

I'd also like to plot the resulting polynomial spline.

Thanks!

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The title "B-spline confusion" appears apt. How can you have a cubic spline with 10 knots and degree = 3? – 42- Apr 5 '13 at 16:19
    
@DWin That is exactly what bs does, is it not? Cubic polynomials of degree 3 (by default) fitted between the knots with condition that the individual pieces join smoothly at the knots? – Gavin Simpson Apr 5 '13 at 16:34
    
I suppose for some understanding of the problem. I thought what was being asked for was a cubic polynomial fit across the entire range of the data. Otherwise just executing trivial modifications to the example code on the ?bs page would seem to fully address the question: lm(weight ~ bs(height, df = 3, knots=c(58, 62, 66, 70, 72), ), data = women) – 42- Apr 5 '13 at 16:52
up vote 8 down vote accepted
## simulate some data - from mgcv::magic
set.seed(1)
n <- 400
x <- 0:(n-1)/(n-1)
f <- 0.2*x^11*(10*(1-x))^6+10*(10*x)^3*(1-x)^10
y <- f + rnorm(n, 0, sd = 2)

## load the splines package - comes with R
require(splines)

You use the bs() function in a formula to lm as you want OLS estimates. bs provides the basis functions as given by the knots, degree of polynomial etc.

mod <- lm(y ~ bs(x, knots = seq(0.1, 0.9, by = 0.1)))

You can treat that just like a linear model.

> anova(mod)
Analysis of Variance Table

Response: y
                                        Df Sum Sq Mean Sq F value    Pr(>F)    
bs(x, knots = seq(0.1, 0.9, by = 0.1))  12 2997.5 249.792  65.477 < 2.2e-16 ***
Residuals                              387 1476.4   3.815                      
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

Some pointers on knot placement. bs has an argument Boundary.knots, with default Boundary.knots = range(x) - hence when I specified the knots argument above, I did not include the boundary knots.

Read ?bs for more information.

Producing a plot of the fitted spline

In the comments I discuss how to draw the fitted spline. One option is to order the data in terms of the covariate. This works fine for a single covariate, but need not work for 2 or more covariates. A further issue is that you can only evaluate the fitted spline at the observed values of x - this is fine if you have densely sampled the covariate, but if not, the spline may look odd, with long linear sections.

A more general solution is to use predict to generate predictions from the model for new values of the covariate or covariates. In the code below I show how to do this for the model above, predicting for 100 evenly-spaced values over the range of x.

pdat <- data.frame(x = seq(min(x), max(x), length = 100))
## predict for new `x`
pdat <- transform(pdat, yhat = predict(mod, newdata = pdat))

## now plot
ylim <- range(pdat$y, y) ## not needed, but may be if plotting CIs too
plot(y ~ x)
lines(yhat ~ x, data = pdat, lwd = 2, col = "red")

That produces

enter image description here

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That helps a lot thanks! Now if I plot the fitted values using points(x,fitted(mod)) I get what I'm looking for. However, using lines(x,fitted(mod)) doesn't connect the points to show the polynomial spline. How would I go about plotting the resulting spline? – user2249626 Apr 5 '13 at 16:46
    
@user2249626 if your data are not in arranged in order of x then the fitted values won't be in the order of x and hence what looks OK when plotted via points is a spaghetti mess when plotted using lines. Two options; i) easiest is just to sort your data before fitting the model, or ii) use predict on the model supplying new x values as seq(min(x), max(x), length = 100). Then plot that. – Gavin Simpson Apr 5 '13 at 17:08
    
Sorry, I'm a new R user. What exactly do you mean by sort? Put the x,y pairs in a matrix and sort that matrix by the x column? – user2249626 Apr 5 '13 at 18:31
    
@user2249626 yes, well in a data frame and sort the pairs. I'll show you that after lunch... Check back for an edit in 30 mins or so. – Gavin Simpson Apr 5 '13 at 18:33
    
I had a little think about it. I'm sorting the data frame as follows: df <- data.frame(x,y) df_ordered <- df[order(df$x),]. Then I fit the model like this: mod <- lm(df_ordered$y~bs(df_ordered$x,knots=seq(0.1,0.9, by=0.1))). Then I add the spline to my scatterplot: lines(df_ordered$x,fitted(mod)) Would this be the correct way of fitting and displaying the polynomial spline? – user2249626 Apr 6 '13 at 9:19

Based on the example in the answer, a simpler way to plot the fitted spline would be to use the effects package.

## simulate some data - from mgcv::magic
set.seed(1)
n <- 400
x <- 0:(n-1)/(n-1)
f <- 0.2*x^11*(10*(1-x))^6+10*(10*x)^3*(1-x)^10
y <- f + rnorm(n, 0, sd = 2)

## load the splines package - comes with R
require(splines)
require(car)
require(effects)

## estimate model
mod <- lm(y ~ bs(x, knots = seq(0.1, 0.9, by = 0.1)))

Then you can use Anova from car:

> Anova(mod)
Anova Table (Type II tests)

Response: y
                                       Sum Sq  Df F value    Pr(>F)    
bs(x, knots = seq(0.1, 0.9, by = 0.1)) 2997.5  12  65.477 < 2.2e-16 ***
Residuals                              1476.4 387                      
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

And you can easily plot the fitted spline using effects package.

plot(allEffects(mod))

Which will output this:

enter image description here

See also:

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