Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Say I wanted to have a very large block of pretty printed html code strait inline with my ruby code. What is the cleanest way to do this without losing any formatting in my string or having to remember some sort of gsub regex.

Encoding it all in one line is easy to do but hard to read:

1.times do
  # Note that the spaces have been changed to _ so that they are easy to see here.
  doc = "\n<html>\n__<head>\n____<title>\n______Title\n____</title>\n__</head>\n__<body>\n____Body\n__</body>\n</html>\n"
  ans = "Your document: %s" % [doc]
  puts ans
end

Multiline text in ruby is easier to read but the string can't be indented with the rest of the code:

1.times do
  doc = "
<html>
  <head>
    <title>
      Title
    </title>
  </head>
  <body>
    Body
  </body>
</html>
"
  ans = "Your document: %s" % [doc]
  puts ans
end

For example the following is indented with my code, but the string now has four extra spaces in front of every line:

1.times do
  doc = <<-EOM

    <html>
      <head>
        <title>
          Title
        </title>
      </head>
      <body>
        Body
      </body>
    </html>
  EOM
  ans = "Your document: %s" % [doc]
  puts ans
end

Most people go with the HEREDOC code above, and do a regex replace on the result to take out the extra whitespace at the beginning of each line. I would like a way where I don't have to go through the trouble of regexing each time.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Vanson Samuel, Wayne Conrad ruby Jan 16 at 12:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Check out - stackoverflow.com/questions/3350648/… – theglauber Apr 5 '13 at 16:52
1  
Also - stackoverflow.com/questions/3772864/… – theglauber Apr 5 '13 at 17:00
    
I have a string ("when \n the\n clock\n strikes\n ten\n") that would be much cleaner if it can be typed in with actual newline characters. doesn't make sense. "\n" are actual newline characters. – the Tin Man Apr 5 '13 at 19:10
    
@(the Tin Man) I rewrote the question. – Vanson Samuel Apr 6 '13 at 18:25
    
@theglauber I would like to use something off the shelf, and I don't want to memorize some regex. – Vanson Samuel Apr 6 '13 at 18:26
up vote 14 down vote accepted
string = %q{This
    is
        indented
  and
    has
         newlines}

Here is a blog with some examples of %q{}, %Q{} and others.

As far as having it easy to remember, think 'Q' for `Quotation Marks'.

Sidenote: Technically you don't need the 'q' while doing quotation.

string = %{This
   also
      is indented
  and
     has
   newlines
      and handles interpolation like 1 + 1 = #{1+1}
}

However, it is best practice and more readable to use %Q{}.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the blog link. :) – Arup Rakshit Apr 5 '13 at 17:43
    
I like %q{}, %Q{}, and %{}. However I want the string to be indented with my code. I rewrote my question so that it is clearer. – Vanson Samuel Apr 6 '13 at 18:31

The following is more verbose, but has almost no performance overhead. It's about as fast as a single long string literal:

def make_doc(body)
  "<html>\n"       \
  "  <head>\n"     \
  "    <title>\n"  \
  "      Title\n"  \
  "    </title>\n" \
  "  </head>\n"    \
  "  <body>\n"     \
  "    #{body}\n"  \
  "  </body>\n"    \
  "</html>"
end

puts make_doc('hello')
share|improve this answer

It's not real obvious what you're asking for. If I wanted to generate strings like:

"when \n the\n clock\n strikes\n ten\n"

on the fly, I'd build them dynamically:

%w[when the clock strikes ten].join("\n ")
=> "when\n the\n clock\n strikes\n ten"

Concatenating a trailing "\n" will add the trailing carriage return:

%w[when the clock strikes ten].join("\n ") + "\n"
=> "when\n the\n clock\n strikes\n ten\n"

If I am dealing with sub-strings that have embedded spaces, I'd adjust the array to:

['when the', 'clock strikes', 'ten'].join("\n ") + "\n"
=> "when the\n clock strikes\n ten\n"
share|improve this answer
    
You are right the question was hard to understand. I rewrote it. Hopefully it's easier to understand now. – Vanson Samuel Apr 6 '13 at 18:32

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.