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I looked everywhere and tried everything to get the selected value from a group of radio buttons.

Here's my HTML:

<div id="rates">

<input type="radio" id="r1" name="rate" value="Fixed Rate"> Fixed Rate

<input type="radio" id="r2" name="rate" value="Variable Rate"> Variable Rate

<input type="radio" id="r3" name="rate" value="Multi Rate" checked="checked"> Multi Rate  

Here's my .js:

var rates = document.getElementById('rates').value;
var rate_value;

if(rates =='Fixed Rate'){
    rate_value = document.getElementById('r1').value;

}else if(rates =='Variable Rate'){
    rate_value = document.getElementById('r2').value;

}else if(rates =='Multi Rate'){
    rate_value = document.getElementById('r3').value;
}  

document.getElementById('results').innerHTML = rate_value;

I keep getting undefined.

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3  
You're not using jQuery here, but if you ever wanted to, you could use this: $("input[type='radio'][name='rate']:checked").val(); –  GJK Apr 5 '13 at 16:48
    
Why can't you inspect that object? Anyway you need to use .checked –  Amol M Kulkarni Apr 5 '13 at 16:52
    
possible duplicate of getting selected value of radio button in case of action –  GOTO 0 Jul 23 '13 at 10:52
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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted
var rates = document.getElementById('rates').value;

The rates element is a div, so it won't have a value. This is probably where the undefined is coming from.

The checked property will tell you whether the element is selected:

if (document.getElementById('r1').checked) {
  rate_value = document.getElementById('r1').value;
}
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PERFECT!! THANKS!!! –  ZombieBatman Apr 5 '13 at 17:01
3  
In jquery it'd be $("input[name=rate]:checked").val() –  Kamran Ahmed Nov 28 '13 at 10:31
    
I don't understand, are there two elements with the same ID? –  mzalazar May 24 at 15:50
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A year or so has passed since the question was asked, but I thought a substantial improvement of the answers was possible. I find this the easiest and most versatile script, because it checks whether a button has been checked, and if so, what its value is:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <title>Check radio checked and its value</title>
</head>
<body>
    <form action="">
        <input type="radio" name="yourName" value="10"><br>
        <input type="radio" name="yourName" value="20"><br>
        <input type="radio" name="yourName" value="30"><br>
        <input type="radio" name="yourName" value="40"><br>
        <input type="button" value="Check" onclick="getRadioValue('yourName')">
    </form>
    <script>
        function getRadioValue(groupName) {
            var radios = document.getElementsByName(groupName);
            window.rdValue = null;
            for (var i=0; i<radios.length; i++) {
                var aRadio = radios[i];
                if (aRadio.checked) {
                    var foundCheckedRadio = aRadio;
                    rdValue = foundCheckedRadio.value;
                    break;
                }
                else rdValue = 'noRadioChecked';
            }
            if (rdValue == '10') {
                // do something
            }
            else if (rdValue == 'noRadioChecked') {
                // do something else
            }
        }
    </script>
</body>
</html>

You can also call the function within another function, like this:

function doWhatever() {
    // function description goes here

    getRadioValue('yourName');
    if (rdValue == '10') {
        // do something
    }
    else if (rdValue == 'noRadioChecked') {
        // do something else
    }  
} 
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directly calling a radio button many times gives you the value of the FIRST button, not the CHECKED button. instead of looping thru radio buttons to see which one is checked, i prefer to call an onclick javascript function that sets a variable that can later be retrieved at will.

<input type="radio" onclick="handleClick(this)" name="reportContent" id="reportContent" value="/reportFleet.php" >

which calls:

var currentValue = 0;
function handleClick(myRadio) {
    currentValue = myRadio.value;
    document.getElementById("buttonSubmit").disabled = false; 
}

additional advantage being that i can treat data and/or react to the checking of a button (in this case, enabling SUBMIT button).

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2  
you should bind the onchange event instead, in cases the user uses a keyboard. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 30 '13 at 10:50
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In Javascript we can get the values by using Id's "getElementById()" in the above code you posted has contain name not Id so you to modify like this

if (document.getElementById('r1').checked) {
  rate_value = document.getElementById('r1').value;
}

use this rate_value according to your code

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You can get the value by using the checked property.

var rates = document.getElementsByName('rate');
var rate_value;
for(var i = 0; i < rates.length; i++){
    if(rates[i].checked){
        rate_value = rates[i].value;
    }
}
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This works in IE8 and above and all other browsers.

document.querySelector('input[name="rate"]:checked').value;
share|improve this answer
    
This is very clean. –  Joe Apr 5 '13 at 17:06
    
@Joe sure it is, but it comes with the cost of performance. –  Kamran Ahmed Nov 28 '13 at 10:33
    
Of course you would have to check if querySelector returns null. This is the case if no radio button is checked. –  Robert Feb 3 at 8:20
    
I had to do: $('input[name="rate"]:checked')[0].value; –  ancajic Mar 4 at 13:18
    
I had to do: .val() instead of .value; –  Francisco Corrales Morales 8 hours ago
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