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I'd like my class to detect that a new instance is equivalent (vis a vis isEqual: and hash) to some existing instance, and create only unique instances. Here's code that I think does the job, but I'm concerned it's doing something dumb that I can't spot...

Say it's an NSURLRequest subclass like this:

// MyClass.h
@interface MyClass : NSMutableURLRequest
@end

// MyClass.m

@implementation MyClass

+ (NSMutableSet *)instances {

    static NSMutableSet *_instances;
    static dispatch_once_t once;

    dispatch_once(&once, ^{ _instances = [[NSMutableSet alloc] init];});
    return _instances;
}

- (id)initWithURL:(NSURL *)URL {

    self = [super initWithURL:URL];
    if (self) {
        if ([self.class.instances containsObject:self])
            self = [self.class.instances member:self];
        else
            [self.class.instances addObject:self];
    }
    return self;
}


// Caller.m
NSURL *urlA = [NSURL urlWithString:@"http://www.yahoo.com"];

MyClass *instance0 = [[MyClass alloc] initWithURL: urlA];
MyClass *instance1 = [[MyClass alloc] initWithURL: urlA];  // 2

BOOL works = instance0 == instance1;  // works => YES, but at what hidden cost?

Questions:

  1. That second assignment to self in init looks weird, but not insane. Or is it?
  2. Is it just wishful coding to think that second alloc (of instance1) gets magically cleaned up?
share|improve this question
    
just remembered not to depend on a unique call to +initialize. edited. –  danh Apr 5 '13 at 17:48
2  
I'd change that +initialize to use dispatch_once(). –  bbum Apr 5 '13 at 17:56
    
i see. also, i think i'll include dealloc code for completeness. –  danh Apr 5 '13 at 18:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
  1. It's not insane, but in manual retain/release mode, you do need to release self beforehand or you'll leak an uninitialized object every time this method is run. In ARC, the original instance will automatically be released for you.

  2. See #1.

BTW, for any readers who usually stop at one answer, bbum's answer below includes a full working example of a thread-safe implementation. Highly recommended for anyone making a class that does this.

share|improve this answer
    
I find this question very interesting, when the NSMutableArray checks if the object is already contained in the array, does it check for matching pointers? If that were the case then this code should not work, what is the criteria for NSMutableArray's containsObject:? –  John Apr 5 '13 at 17:36
    
@John the mutable set uses isEqual: to check membership. This can be (and usually is) implemented to answer 'weak' equality or equivalence. –  danh Apr 5 '13 at 17:37
    
@Chuck, thanks. So it sounds like self in init can/should be treated like any other reference? –  danh Apr 5 '13 at 17:39
    
@danh: self is really just an argument to your method. You can treat it like you would any argument. –  Chuck Apr 5 '13 at 17:40
2  
It's important to note that your NSMutableSet will hold strong refs to all of your objects, so removing them in -dealloc isn't going to do anything—they'll only be destroyed if you manually remove them from the set first. –  Seamus Campbell Apr 5 '13 at 19:33

Thought of a better way (original answer below the line) assuming you really want to unique by URL. If not, this also demonstrates the synchronization primitive use.

@interface UniqueByURLInstances:NSObject
@property(strong) NSURL *url;
@end

@implementation UniqueByURLInstances
static NSMutableDictionary *InstanceCache()
{
    static NSMutableDictionary *cache;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        cache = [NSMutableDictionary new];
    });
    return cache;
}

static dispatch_queue_t InstanceSerializationQueue()
{
    static dispatch_queue_t queue;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        queue = dispatch_queue_create("UniqueByURLInstances queue", DISPATCH_QUEUE_SERIAL);
    });
    return queue;
}

+ (instancetype)instanceWithURL:(NSURL*)URL
{
    __block UniqueByURLInstances *returnValue = nil;
    dispatch_sync(InstanceSerializationQueue(), ^{
        returnValue = [InstanceCache() objectForKey:URL];
        if (!returnValue)
        {
            returnValue = [[self alloc] initWithURL:URL];
        }
    });
    return returnValue;
}

- (id)initWithURL:(NSURL *)URL
{
    __block UniqueByURLInstances* returnValue = self;
    dispatch_sync(InstanceSerializationQueue(), ^{
        returnValue = [InstanceCache() objectForKey:URL];
        if (returnValue) return;

        returnValue = [super initWithURL:URL];
        if (returnValue) {
            [InstanceCache() setObject:returnValue forKey:URL];
        }

        _url = URL;
    });

    return returnValue;
}

- (void)dealloc {
    dispatch_sync(InstanceSerializationQueue(), ^{
        [InstanceCache() removeObjectForKey:_url];
    });
    // rest o' dealloc dance here 
}
@end

Caveat: Above was typed into SO -- never been run. I may have screwed something up. It assumes ARC is enabled. Yes, it'll end up looking up URL twice when using the factory method, but that extra lookup should be lost in the noise of allocation and initialization. Doing that means that the developer could use either the factory or the initializer and still see unique'd instances but there will be no allocation on execution of the factory method when the instance for that URL already exists.

(If you can't unique by URL, then go back to your NSMutableSet and skip the factory method entirely.)


What Chuck said, but some additional notes:

Restructure your code like this:

+(NSMutableSet*)instances
{
    static NSMutableSet *_instances;
    dispatch_once( ...., ^{ _instances = [[NSMutableSet alloc] init];});
    return instances;
}

Then call that method whenever you want access to instances. It localizes all the code in one spot and isolates it from +initialize (which isn't really a big deal).

If your class may be instantiated from multiple threads, you'll want to surround the check-allocate-or-return with a synchronization primitive. I would suggest a dispatch_queue.

share|improve this answer
    
good thoughts, thanks. can you elaborate on the synchronization primitive? –  danh Apr 5 '13 at 18:03
    
really useful advice. Thanks. There are one or two tweaks required to your answer in order to compile. e.g. the dispatch_sync block can't have a return, so it must wrap the super init logic in a conditional. Also, I think it's better to use the object itself as a key to the instance cache, this way this same object can encapsulate it's definition of equivalence. And I think (at)SeamusCampbell makes a good point above about the dealloc. I guess I'll get this working in a test project and suggest an edit here? Thanks very much for the good advice. –  danh Apr 5 '13 at 23:00
    
Sorry, I "corrected" it wrongly. Somehow my eyes skipped a line and it looked obviously wrong, but of course it wasn't. Should have known better! –  Chuck Apr 5 '13 at 23:17
    
@danh if equality is determined by the URL, then using it is more efficient by avoiding allocation traffic and doesn't run afoul of the dealloc issue. But, yeah, depends on needs! The equivalence logic remains encapsulated in the class, too. If you truly need instance equivalence, then move to a weak pointer set (NSHashTable) and the dealloc issue is addressed. –  bbum Apr 6 '13 at 14:35
    
Thanks @bbum. I've got a working copy using much of your/Chuck advice above. It subclasses NSURLRequest, and does the set removal after the request is run. (I prefer the set, because I don't really need key/value). The init logic in your answer crashes with as bad access for some reason. I fixed by wrapping my more traditional init in the dispatch_synch using a _block var for self. –  danh Apr 6 '13 at 14:49

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