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The volatile keyword is used to protect fields from certain compiler optimizations:

For non-volatile fields, optimization techniques that reorder instructions can lead to unexpected and unpredictable results in multi-threaded programs that access fields without synchronization such as that provided by the lock-statement (Section 8.12)

However, MSDN doesn't seem to make clear whether lock applies optimization protections to just the object used in the expression, or all statements in the statement_block.

If I have a block of code:

lock(obj_something){
    boolFoo = true;
    if(boolIsFriday)
        doSomething(anything);
}

Is boolFoo and boolIsFriday implicity volatile (even if it was not declared volatile)?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a difficult topic and I suggest you start by reading Joe Duffy's book Concurrent Programming on Windows - it's 1000 pages of pure knowledge.

In answer to your question: no the variables are not made "implicitly volatile"

What the lock does provide - apart from mutual exclusion - is a fence at both acquire and release.

This means some restrictions are put on what re-ordering optimizations can be applied by the compiler, jitter, cpu or anything in between.

In particular:

Acquiring the lock prevents any memory accesses from moving before the fence.
Releasing the lock prevents any memory accesses from moving after the fence.


In your example, the write to boolFoo cannot be observed by any thread before the lock is acquired.

Similarly the reads of boolIsFriday and anything cannot use values that were read before the lock was acquired.

At release, the write to boolFoo must be visible when the lock is released, as must any writes performed by the doSomething method.


In answer to your comment: this doesn't prevent other threads from re-ordering.

If you have another thread B that does this:

// do some work while your lock code is running
for ( int i = 0 ; i < ( int ) 1e7 ; i++ ) ;

var copyOfBoolFoo = boolFoo;

then it is possible for copyOfBoolFoo to be false.

That is because something might look ahead, before the for loop and your lock code runs, and decide to read boolFoo and cache the value.

There isn't anything in thread B to prevent this, so it may happen.

If you put a fence ( e.g. a lock! ) before the read of boolFoo in thread B, then you would guarantee to read the latest value.

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I think I get it now, but I just want to clarify something. After the lock is released, you say boolFoo must be visible. Is it guaranteed to be visible to all other threads at that moment? Could another thread (which did not use a lock) read that variable (immediately after the lock was releasedd) and see the older value? –  Mr. Smith Apr 5 '13 at 18:18
    
@Mr.Smith I've updated my answer to reply to your comment. –  Nicholas Butler Apr 5 '13 at 18:31

However, MSDN doesn't seem to make clear whether lock applies optimization protections to just the object used in the expression, or all statements in the statement_block.

The latter.

Is boolFoo and boolIsFriday implicity volatile (even if it was not declared volatile)?

Not quite, no. The idea of volatile is that the memory barriers are applied any time the object is accessed. The lock only applies the memory barrier to that one use of the object. So there won't be optimizations that mix (certain types of defined) operations from inside and outside the lock statement, but if something else accesses that variable without a lock block you can still get yourself into trouble.

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No, the lock statement only - directly - protects access to the object you're "locking".

The point of it is that if you use an object as a lock source in multiple places, then only one of those code-blocks (inside the lock scope) can be running at any one time owing to possession of the lock.

boolFoo and boolIsFriday are only protected if they are exclusively accessed within a lock of the same object (in this case obj_something)

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Your first statement is simply not true. The memory barrier means that certain types of statements inside and outside the lock block won't be re-ordered in certain ways. It doesn't just limit anything to the object being locked. In fact, it's general practice to create object just for the purpose of locking, and not to lock on an object that's storing data. If this were true, that wouldn't work. –  Servy Apr 5 '13 at 17:48
    
@Servy I'm aware that that's general practice, I use it myself, but there is no explicit or implicit protection of anything inside the lock statement scope except for the locked resource itself, the instructions aren't going to be rearranged because that's just common sense, but it doesn't implicitly mean the fields or properties accessed from within a lock body are volatile. –  Clint Apr 5 '13 at 17:50
2  
A lock statement isn't only there to ensure that the provided block of code is only executed by one thread at a time. It also introduces memory barriers, and limitations as to how operations can be reordered by the processor at runtime, which is what volatile is about. lock provides that same functionality. If you only access a given object inside of a lock you are effectively making it volatile, in a sense. –  Servy Apr 5 '13 at 17:52
    
@Servy to a degree and I appreciate that yes, but it's "in a sense" and a bit of stretch to then associate it with the volatile keyword and its behaviour, there's no implicit volatility applied to those specific fields, the memory barriers for them arise as a side effect of being within the lock scope. –  Clint Apr 5 '13 at 17:54
2  
the memory barriers for them arise as a side effect of being within the lock scope. No, they don't. It's an entirely separate aspect of the functionality of lock. –  Servy Apr 5 '13 at 17:55

Let us take a closer look at your example to help answer your questions. I am going to tweak your code just a bit to make it more clear when the read of boolIsFriday happens. The behavior is still the same. So here is what we have.

lock(obj_something)
{
    boolFoo = true;
    var register1 = boolIsFriday;
    if (register1)
    {
        var register2 = anything;
        doSomething(register2);
    }
}

Next we are going to decorate this code with an arrow notation to help visualize where the memory barriers are. I will use a ↑ arrow and a ↓ arrow to represent a release-fence and an acquire-fence respectively. Volatile writes have release semantics so they will have a ↑ placed before the write. Volatile reads have acquire semantics so they will have a ↓ placed after the read. Think of the arrow head as pushing everything away from it. No other read or write can float up or down past the head of the arrow. If you think it about in precisely the terms I just described then this should accurately reflect what the memory barriers are doing. It also just happens to agree with the specification.

There are a couple of more things to mention before we get started. First, while no other memory access is allowed to move past the head of an arrow they are still allowed to move past the tail. Again, this complies with the wording of the specification. Second, once the memory barriers are generated they are locked into place. The mechanisms that generate them, like a volatile read or write, are still free to move around though. In other words, the arrows cannot move, but the corresponding read or write can. Third, a lock produces a full memory barrier.


Are memory accesses implicitly volatile when inside a lock?

To answer this question I will add the arrow notation to your example.

↑
lock(obj_something)
↓
{
    boolFoo = true;
    var register1 = boolIsFriday;
    if (register1)
    {
        var register2 = anything;
        doSomething(register2);
    }
↑
}
↓

Notice where the arrows are placed. In lieu of no other memory generators then only lock is injecting them. There are several facts that should be apparent now.

  1. No memory accesses outside of the lock block can move inside the block.
  2. No memory accesses inside of the lock block can move outside the block.
  3. All memory accesses inside of the lock block are free to move around as long point #2 is satisfied.

This should answer one of your questions immediately. No, boolFoo and boolIsFriday do not implicitly inherit volatility semantics from the lock. They are still free to move around, albeit with some constraints now.

So what if boolFoo and boolIsFriday were both marked as volatile. Let us take a look and see what happens.

↑
lock(obj_something)
↓
{
    ↑
    boolFoo = true;
    var register1 = boolIsFriday;
    ↓
    if (register1)
    {
        var register2 = anything;
        doSomething(register2);
    }
↑
}
↓

Notice were the arrows are placed. There is a ↑ arrow before the write to boolFoo to indicate that no other memory access can float down through the volatile write. Likewise, there is a ↓ arrow after the read of boolIsFriday to indicate that no other memory access can float up through the volatile read. There are two peculiar facts that are apparent now.

  1. The write to boolFoo and the read of boolIsFriday can get swapped. Notice the absence of an arrow that would prevent that.
  2. The write to boolFoo could float all the way down to the end of the lock block (assuming of course that dosomething does not generate memory barriers. It is the ↑ arrow that ends the lock block that prevents it from going down further.
  3. The read of boolIsFriday cannot float down very far because at some point it would have to swap places with the read of anything. But, if that happened then that would be semantically the same as anything floating up past the ↓ representing the volatile read. We already said that movement was prevented.

Does lock constrain optimizations on the expression or the contents of block?

And finally to answer the other question you had. The lock keyword does have some affect on both the lock expression and the contents of the lock block itself. Let us take a look and see how this happens. I have contrived a lock statement with an interesting expression.

object foo;
lock (foo=bar)
{
  // contents of lock here
}

Do you see what I did? I put an assignment in the expression. And if we reorganize it to better see what is going on here is what it will look like.

object foo;
foo = bar;
object expression = foo;
↑
lock (expression)
↓
{
  // contents of lock here
↑
}
↓

Notice the following things now.

  1. The write to foo is not allowed to float down because of the ↑ generated by the lock statement. This is one way the lock expression affected.
  2. We already discussed that the contents of the lock block now have constraints placed on their movement.

So to answer your question the lock keyword places optimization constraints on both the lock expression and the contents of the lock block.

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If only this had been posted four months ago, lol. Awesome writeup. –  Mr. Smith Aug 10 '13 at 13:22

All the statements inside the block are guaranteed to be well-ordered, as a unit, with respect to any other statements that execute within a block holding the same lock, as a unit. No more, no less.

So if you have:

lock (foo) // in one thread
{
  x();
  y();
}

lock (foo) // in another
{
  a();
  b();
}

You are guaranteed the execution order is either x y a b or a b x y.

You prevent x a b y, x a y b, or x and a running at the same time and blowing up.

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+1 for putting the execution order issue more succinctly than I managed –  Clint Apr 5 '13 at 17:52
1  
No more, no less. Actually, it does do more. It introduces memory barriers. Without that it would be possible for code to execute in the "correct" order, but for various threads to be reading stale data, or not persisting their writes in a way visible to others. This is also what volatile is there for. –  Servy Apr 5 '13 at 17:54
1  
@Servy: The memory barriers are part of what's needed for the statements to be well-ordered. Without memory barriers, lock(foo){a=0; b=1;}, lock(foo){if (b==1) ++a;} would not be well-ordered. (Well ordered means either all the effects of one are visible to the other or none are.) Discussing memory barriers makes things more confusing. They're just part of the mechanism used internally to allow the lock to meet its guarantee, which is that the statements be well-ordered. –  David Schwartz Apr 5 '13 at 17:57
1  
@Servy: Say there was a platform that had no write posting, no speculative fetches, no caches, and only one core -- would locks still necessarily have memory barriers on that platform? The answer is clearly no, they wouldn't have to. So memory barriers are not inherently part of what locks provide, they're one of the things necessary to properly implement locks on platforms that require them because of their platform-specific characteristcs. I'm explaining what the semantics of locks are, not how to implement them on particular platforms. –  David Schwartz Apr 5 '13 at 18:11

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