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I am relatively new to programming with scala and akka and I tried to write a solution for the n-queens problem using akka actors. Unfortunately my idea didn't work well: It took way longer to compute all solutions compared to the sequential method and the program never terminates. However some right solutions are printed to the console. Here's my code:

  case class Work(list: List[Point])
  case class Reply(list: List[Point])

  class QueenWorker(val master: ActorRef) extends Actor {
        override def preStart() = {
      println("new worker")
    }
    def receive = {
      case Work(list) =>
        val len = list.length
        if (len < size) {
          val actors = for (
            i <- 0 until size if (!list.exists(_.y == i))
          ) yield (context.actorOf(Props(new QueenWorker(master))), i)
          actors.foreach { case (actor, pos) => actor ! Work(list :+ (new Point(len, pos))) }

   } else {
          if (check(list)) { //check() checks whether the solution is valid
            master ! Reply(list)
            println("solution found!")
          }
          //else sender ! Reply(List[List[Point]]())
        }
         //context.stop(self) //when do I have to use it?
         //println("worker stopped - len "+len)
    }
  }

  class QueenMaster extends Actor {
    override def preStart() = {
      println("preStart")
      context.actorOf(Props(new QueenWorker(self))) ! Work(List[Point]())
    }

      def receive = {//print solution to console
      case Reply(list) =>
        for (x <- 0 until size) {
          for (y <- 0 until size) {
            if (list.exists(p => p.x == x && p.y == y)) print("x ") else print("o ")
          }
          println()
        }
        println()
    }
  }

 def runParallel {
    val system = ActorSystem("QueenSystem")
    val queenMaster = system.actorOf(Props[QueenMaster])
  }

My intention was to create a new actor for every new backtracking iteration. If an actor has found a valid solution it is send to the master who prints it to the console.

  • The program never terminates. However, if I remove the comments around //context.stop(self) no solutions are found at all. How can I fix this issue?
  • My whole approach seems to be wrong. What could be a better one?
  • Would it be possible to find a parallel solution using futures instead of actors?

Thanks in advance!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

After a bit of tweaking I managed to run your program and obtain the results for size=8. For debugging purposes add these two lines in runParallel:

readLine()
system.shutdown()

When the program finishes - press enter - this will cause the shutdown method to be invoked and your program will exit.

I'm running on a 8-core i7 2.2Ghz machine - so your results may vary.

Regarding performance, this is pretty much an inefficient solution and here is why: At each step in the backtracking process - that is for each tried partial solution - you are creating and actor and doing a simple loop which creates more actors for the next proposed solutions.

Now, creating an actor in Akka is pretty fast but I dare say that in your case the overhead of creating an actor is bigger (probably by an order of magnitude, even) than the actual work it is doing - I haven't tested this, but it's likely.

The number of analysed partial solutions here is exponential in the size of the board. That is you are creating an exponential number of actors - this is a lot of overhead and you certainly lose any advantage gained by computing the solutions in parallel.

How can we make this better ? Well, for one, we can create a few less actors.

Lets create a fixed pool of QueenWorker actors (the same number as the number of cores you have in your computer), and place them behind a SmallesMailboxRouter.

When your workers check the current solution in the processed Work message instead of creating new actors they will send the new proposed solutions to the router, and the router will dispatch these new Work messages to its routees, in a uniform fashion.

A worker actor will now process a lot more partial solutions and not just one, as it did until now. That's a much better actual_work/akka_housekeeping ratio than before.

Can we do even better then this ? I think we can, if you model your problem a bit differently. In the queens problem, and in general, in backtracking you are exploring a tree of partial solutions. At each step in your algorithm when you generate more partial solutions from existing ones you are branching your tree. The problem with your approach is that when you are branching in the algorithm you are also branching in the concurrency flow - I'm referring here to the fact that you are sending a new Work message to be processed by another actor. This is fine, but if you add the numbers you'll see that this is a lot of overhead which won't gain you any time advantage.

That is because the granularity of your Work tasks is very small. You are doing very little work between sending messages - and this affects your performance. You can make your workers explore a much larger chunk of partial solutions before generating new Work messages.

For example, if you have an 8-core CPU, and the problem has size=8 then you are better of creating 8 workers and giving to worker K the task to compute the solutions which have the queen sitting on column K in the first line. Now each worker executes only one Work task which represents roughly 1/8 of the total work - this will give much better results.

Regarding a solution with futures - you can certainly do that but I think the program time will be roughly the same as the actor solution with the fixed pool of actors. But I encourage you to try since I might be wrong.

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Thanks a lot for your answer. You were right - the main problem is to find a solution that divides the problem efficently but doesn't produce too many actors or messages. Even the SmallesMailboxRouter-solution didn't work out well, because I created too many messages. However, I found a solution that creates a new actor for every position of the first queen (like you advised) This is actually faster than the sequential processing, the downside is that the problem is "only" split up into n (n=size of the chessfield) pieces (but that's better than nothing!) Here's some code:

class QueenActor extends Actor {
    override def preStart {
      val start = System.currentTimeMillis()
      val listOfFutures = (for (i <- 0 until size) yield Future { doIt2(List[Point](new Point(0, i))) }).toList
      val futureOfLists = Future.sequence(listOfFutures)
      futureOfLists.onSuccess {
        case lists =>
          var solutions = 0
          for (list <- lists.flatten) {
            solutions += 1
            println(solutions + ":")

            for (x <- 0 until size) {
              for (y <- 0 until size) {
                if (list.exists(p => p.x == x && p.y == y)) print("x ") else print("o ")
              }
              println()
            }
            println()
          }

          println("Time: " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - start))
          System.exit(0)

      }

    }
    def receive = {
      case _ =>
    }
  }

  def runParallelFutures {
    val system = ActorSystem("QueenSystem")
    val queenMaster = system.actorOf(Props[QueenActor])

  }

I only need the Actor because without one the program would terminate immediately, although the futures aren't processed yet. However, this solution does not seem very "elegant" - maybe there's a better one. But I think I can't use "Await" because I would have to indicate a timeout (which I can't know beforehand)

Again, thanks a lot!

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Hi @user2250024, you're not supposed to use answers like a conversation. Please read the site's about section to become familiar with how the site works. –  pagoda_5b Apr 8 '13 at 22:15

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