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I've never really used threading before in C# where I need to have two threads, as well as the main UI thread. Basically, I have the following.

public void StartTheActions()
{
  //Starting thread 1....
  Thread t1 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(action1));
  t1.Start();

  // Now, I want for the main thread (which is calling `StartTheActions` method) 
  // to wait for `t1` to finish. I've created an event in `action1` for this. 
  // The I wish `t2` to start...

  Thread t2 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(action2));
  t2.Start();
}

So, essentially, my question is how to have a thread wait for another one to finish. What is the best way to do this?

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4  
If you've "... never used threading before ..." you might want to consider some simpler alternatives such as *Async() pattern. –  Dan Oct 18 '09 at 5:29
4  
If you are just waiting for thread 1 to finish anyways, why are you not just calling that method synchronously? –  Svish Feb 9 '10 at 11:14
8  
What's the point in using threads when you're processing in a linear fashion? –  John Feb 12 '10 at 16:35

7 Answers 7

up vote 154 down vote accepted

I can see 5 options available:

1. Thread.Join

As with Mitch's answer. But this will block your UI thread, however you get a Timeout built in for you.


2. Use a WaitHandle

ManualResetEvent is a WaitHandle as jrista suggested.

One thing to note is if you want to wait for multiple threads, WaitHandle.WaitAll() won't work by default, as it needs an MTA thread. You can get around this by marking your Main() method with MTAThread - however this blocks your message pump and isn't recommended from what I've read.


3. Fire an event

See this page by Jon Skeet about events and multi-threading, it's possible that an event can become unsuscribed between the if and the EventName(this,EventArgs.Empty) - it's happened to me before.

(Hopefully these compile, I haven't tried)

public class Form1 : Form
{
    int _count;

    void ButtonClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ThreadWorker worker = new ThreadWorker();
        worker.ThreadDone += HandleThreadDone;

        Thread thread1 = new Thread(worker.Run);
        thread1.Start();

        _count = 1;
    }

    void HandleThreadDone(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        // You should get the idea this is just an example
        if (_count == 1)
        {
            ThreadWorker worker = new ThreadWorker();
            worker.ThreadDone += HandleThreadDone;

            Thread thread2 = new Thread(worker.Run);
            thread2.Start();

            _count++;
        }
    }

    class ThreadWorker
    {
        public event EventHandler ThreadDone;

        public void Run()
        {
            // Do a task

            if (ThreadDone != null)
                ThreadDone(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }
}

4. Use a delegate

public class Form1 : Form
{
    int _count;

    void ButtonClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ThreadWorker worker = new ThreadWorker(HandleThreadDone);

        Thread thread1 = new Thread(worker.Run);
        thread1.Start();

        _count = 1;
    }

    void HandleThreadDone()
    {
        // As before - just a simple example
        if (_count == 1)
        {
            ThreadWorker worker = new ThreadWorker();

            Thread thread2 = new Thread(worker.Run);
            thread2.Start(HandleThreadDone);

            _count++;
        }
    }

    class ThreadWorker
    {
        // Switch to your favourite Action<T> or Func<T>
        public void Run(object state)
        {
            // Do a task

            Action completeAction = (Action)state;
            completeAction.Invoke();
        }
    }
}

If you do use the _count method, it might be an idea (to be safe) to increment it using

Interlocked.Increment(ref _count)

I'd be interested to know the difference between using delegates and events for thread notification, the only difference I know are events are called synchronously.


5. Do it asynchronously instead

The answer to this question has a very clear description of your options with this method.


Delegate/Events on the wrong thread

The event/delegate way of doing things will mean your event handler method is on thread1/thread2 not the main UI thread, so you will need to switch back right at the top of the HandleThreadDone methods:

// Delegate example
if (InvokeRequired)
{
    Invoke(new Action(HandleThreadDone));
    return;
}
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26  
Holy crap that is comprehensive. Nice job! –  Bjørn Otto Vasbotten Mar 24 '10 at 10:25
    
You are a boss! Was searching everywhere for just this answer! –  Jake Steele Feb 18 at 20:24

Add

t1.Join();    // Wait until thread t1 finishes

after you start it, but that won't accomplish much as it's essentialy the same result as running on the main thread!

I can highly recommended reading Joe Albahari's Threading in C# free e-book, if you want to gain an understanding of threading in .NET.

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3  
Even though Join is literally what the asker seems to have been asking for, this can be extremely bad in general. A call to Join will hang up the thread from which this being done. If that happens to be the main GUI thread, this is BAD! As a user I actively loathe applications that seem to work this way. So please see all the other answers to this question and stackoverflow.com/questions/1221374/… –  peSHIr Feb 9 '10 at 11:30
    
I agree that in general Join() is bad. I perhaps didn't make that obvious enough in my answer. –  Mitch Wheat Aug 12 '11 at 0:37
    
Guys, one size does not fit all. There are situations, when one really needs to be sure, that thread has finished its work: consider, that the thread processes the data, which are just about to be changed. In such case notifying the thread to cancel gracefully and waiting till it finishes (especially, when one step is processed very quickly) is IMO fully justified. I would rather say, that Join is evil (in C++ FAQ terms), ie. it shall not be used unless really required. –  Spook Nov 10 '12 at 12:01
    
@spook: what are you talking about? This is a 3 year old question. Did you have something to add? –  Mitch Wheat Nov 10 '12 at 12:02
1  
I want to state clearly, that Join is a tool, that can be useful, despite the fact, that it is very often misused. There are some situations, when it will just work without any unnecessary side effects (such as stalling main GUI thread for a noticeable amount of time). –  Spook Nov 10 '12 at 12:05

The previous two answers are great, and will work for simple scenarios. There are other ways to synchronize threads, however. The following will also work:

public void StartTheActions()
{
    ManualResetEvent syncEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);

    Thread t1 = new Thread(
        () =>
        {
            // Do some work...
            syncEvent.Set();
        }
    );
    t1.Start();

    Thread t2 = new Thread(
        () =>
        {
            syncEvent.WaitOne();

            // Do some work...
        }
    );
    t2.Start();
}

ManualResetEvent is one of the various WaitHandle's that the .NET framework has to offer. They can provide much richer thread synchronization capabilities than the simple but very common tools like lock()/Monitor, Thread.Join, etc. They can also be used to synchronize more than two threads, allowing complex scenarios such as a 'master' thread that coordinates multiple 'child' threads, multiple concurrent processes that are dependent upon several stages of each other to be synchronized, etc.

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You want the Thread.Join() method, or one of its overloads.

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I would have your main thread pass a callback method to your first thread, and when it's done, it will invoke the callback method on the mainthread, which can launch the second thread. This keeps your main thread from hanging while its waiting for a Join or Waithandle. Passing methods as delegates is a useful thing to learn with C# anyway.

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Posting to maybe help some others, spent quite a bit of time looking for a solution like what I came up with. So I took a little different approach. There is a counter option above, I just applied it a bit differently. I was spinning off numerous threads and incremented a counter and decremented a counter as a thread started and stopped. Then in the main method I was wanting to pause and wait for threads to complete I did.

while (threadCounter > 0)
{
    Thread.Sleep(500); //Make it pause for half second so that we don’t spin the cpu out of control.
}

Documented on my blog. http://www.adamthings.com/post/2012/07/11/ensure-threads-have-finished-before-method-continues-in-c/

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1  
This is called busy waiting. Yes it works and sometimes is the best solution, but you want to avoid it if possible because it wastes CPU time –  MobileMon Oct 23 '12 at 15:12

Try this:

List<Thread> myThreads = new List<Thread>();

foreach (Thread curThread in myThreads)
{
    curThread.Start();
}

foreach (Thread curThread in myThreads)
{
    curThread.Join();
}
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