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I have a wpf app I have registered as a URI Scheme by doing the following.

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT
-->myappname
   -->shell
      -->open
         -->command
            (Default) = "c:\pathtomyapp\app.exe"

Fantastic! However, my application enforces that only one instance can run at a time. How can I detect that my app is already running and for example bring it to the foreground?

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Please kindly show how the app.exe you execute via URI Scheme? –  YumYumYum Jun 30 '14 at 6:56
    
Please consider revising the title of this question. It's more to do with single instances rather than URI scheme handlers. –  Steve Dunn Feb 11 at 10:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use a named mutex to detect that application is already running. Or, if you have a GUI app, you can inherit your form from VisualBasic's SingleInstance application , and it will do routhgly the same for you.

  public class SingleInstanceController
    : WindowsFormsApplicationBase
  {
    public SingleInstanceController()
    {
      // Set whether the application is single instance
      this.IsSingleInstance = true;

      this.StartupNextInstance += new
        StartupNextInstanceEventHandler(this_StartupNextInstance);
    }

    void this_StartupNextInstance(object sender, StartupNextInstanceEventArgs e)
    {
      // Here you get the control when any other instance is
      // invoked apart from the first one.
      // You have args here in e.CommandLine.

      // You custom code which should be run on other instances
    }

    protected override void OnCreateMainForm()
    {
      // Instantiate your main application form
      this.MainForm = new Form1();
    }
  }

[STAThread]
static void Main(string[] args)
{    
  SingleInstanceController controller = new SingleInstanceController();
  controller.Run(args);
}

It does not matter whenever you write your code in C#, as this class is avaliable as a part of .Net framework and for all languages.

And here is a wrapper for the WPF

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This stuff seems to be tied to WindowsForms. Is this proper to use in a WPF app? –  Julien Apr 5 '13 at 19:31
    
Added wpf wrapper link to the answer. –  alex Apr 5 '13 at 19:36
    
This is almost perfect. Unfortunately the WPF wrapper errors when using .NET 4.0 –  Julien Apr 8 '13 at 16:32
    
Looks like the MissingAssembly error handler is forcing a lookup for a non existent dll and then erroring. Comment it out and it works but launching a second instance of the app just throws more errors. :( –  Julien Apr 8 '13 at 16:43

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