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I am having frustrating trouble getting my ArrayList to initialize. I am getting an error at the line binaryTreeList.set(1, root); saying

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException: Index: 1, Size: 0
    at java.util.ArrayList.rangeCheck(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.ArrayList.set(Unknown Source)
    at BinaryTreeADT.<init>(BinaryTreeADT.java:18)
    at Driver.main(Driver.java:7)

I'm trying to implement a simple binary tree using an ArrayList and I'd like the "root" element to be at ArrayList position 1. For some reason, the size of the `binaryTreeList is not growing, despite adding nodes to all of them.

Here is my code in order of Driver, BinaryTreeADT and MyTreeNode

public class Driver {


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        MyTreeNode mtn = new MyTreeNode(3, 'R');
        BinaryTreeADT bt = new BinaryTreeADT(mtn);
        bt.printTree();
    }

}

BinaryTreeADT:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import javax.swing.tree.TreeNode;

public class BinaryTreeADT {

    private ArrayList<MyTreeNode> binaryTreeList;
    private MyTreeNode nullNode = new MyTreeNode(true);   //This creates a null node that initially populates the array.

    //Constructor with no root
    public BinaryTreeADT(){
        binaryTreeList = new ArrayList<MyTreeNode>(10);
    }
    public BinaryTreeADT(MyTreeNode root){
        binaryTreeList = new ArrayList<MyTreeNode>(10);
        initializeList();
        binaryTreeList.set(1, root);
    }
    private void initializeList(){
        for (int i = 0; i < binaryTreeList.size(); i++){
            binaryTreeList.add(nullNode);
        }
    }
    public void add(){

    }
    public void printTree(){
        for (int i = 0; i < binaryTreeList.size(); i++){
            if (binaryTreeList.get(i) != null)
                System.out.println(binaryTreeList.get(i).getNodeChar() + " | ");
        }
    }
}

MyTreeNode:

import java.util.Enumeration;
import javax.swing.tree.TreeNode;

public class MyTreeNode implements TreeNode {

    private int nodeKey;
    private char nodeChar;
    private boolean isNull;

    public MyTreeNode(int key, char letter){
        nodeKey = key;
        nodeChar = letter;
    }
    //Constructor for Null Node
    public MyTreeNode(boolean setNull){
        isNull = setNull;
    }
    public boolean isNull(){ //Tells if this is a null node
        return isNull;
    }

    @Override
    public Enumeration children() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean getAllowsChildren() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public TreeNode getChildAt(int arg0) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public int getChildCount() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return 0;
    }

    @Override
    public int getIndex(TreeNode arg0) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return 0;
    }

    @Override
    public TreeNode getParent() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }

    public int getNodeKey() {
        return nodeKey;
    }

    public void setNodeKey(int nodeKey) {
        this.nodeKey = nodeKey;
    }

    public char getNodeChar() {
        return nodeChar;
    }

    public void setNodeChar(char nodeChar) {
        this.nodeChar = nodeChar;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isLeaf() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return false;
    }

}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your reference is out of bounds. You should set the 0th index to your root node. However, since your ArrayList is empty (size = 0), you need to actually add the new element, which will increment the size of the array.

binaryTreeList.add(root);

With arrays, indices start at 0, so the element at index 0 of an array is the first element, the element at index 1 is the second, etc. If you have an array of size n, the last element will be at index n-1.

Later, if you want to change an element at a certain index, you can set the 0th element to root:

binaryTreeList.set(0, root);

This will work provided the first argument (0 in this case) is less than or equal to the binaryTreeList.size()-1.

share|improve this answer
    
I did, see my method initialize(). I don't understand why that is doing nothing. – Imray Apr 5 '13 at 20:52
    
Because binaryTreeList.size() is 0. for (int i = 0; i < binaryTreeList.size(); i++){...} starts i off at 0 then checks to see if it's less than binaryTreeList.size(), so right off the bat the loop exists since i = 0 and 0 is not less than 0. If you want to add exactly 10 elements no matter what, just explicitly say that in your loop: for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { binaryTreeList.add(nullNode); } In order to have a size of more than zero, elements must have already been added to your ArrayList. Since none have, your ArrayList's size is 0, and that's why your loop won't execute. – DesertIvy Apr 5 '13 at 20:57
    
It worked! That's so strange though, can you explain to me why when I initialized the arraylist it didn't actually create the space for the elements? – Imray Apr 5 '13 at 21:21
    
private ArrayList<MyTreeNode> binaryTreeList; simply instantiates the ArrayList, which is by default empty (size 0). In your initializeList method, you are trying to loop through all of the elements in the array, and of course there aren't any, so the loop didn't do anything. In fact, it didn't even run, since at the first iteration, i is 0 and your loop will only execute when i < binaryTreeList.size(), which is also 0; since i, being 0, is not less than 0 (the condition on which your loop runs), the loop exits immediately. – DesertIvy Apr 5 '13 at 22:01

Reason is this line:

binaryTreeList.set(1, root);

Because size of binaryTreeList is zero . You have constructed the ArrayList and told it to have the initial Capacity to be 10 using constructor ArrayList(int initialCapacity) , But since nothing is inside ArrayList right now , so ArrayList#size() is returning as 0. That's why within your initializeList method the for loop is exited at very first iteration which is not initializing the binaryTreeList with 10 elements. So the size of binaryTreeList is again still 0. This is the reason that setting a value at index 1 which is not existing at all is throwing IndexOutOfBoundException.

You should instead define initializeList as:

    private void initializeList(){
     for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++){
        binaryTreeList.add(nullNode);
     }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Although iterating through an empty list is useless, but this loop just doesn't iterate it all. So it can't throw the IndexOutOfBoundsException the problem is a little further down, where binaryTreeList.set(1, root); tries to add an element to index 1 while the size is 0 (as Reimeus already pointed out) – GameDroids Apr 5 '13 at 20:39
    
@GameDroids: My bad..missed that point completely..Thanks for pointing that out.. – Vishal K Apr 5 '13 at 20:44
    
Huh?? Did you miss the initialize method? I am initializing every slot with a Node, but the array still thinks itself is empty – Imray Apr 5 '13 at 20:50
1  
@Imray: Your ArrayList is not filled with node elements in for loop within initializeList() method.. because i < binaryTreeList.size() is returning false in first iteration itself. So your ArrayList is still empty.. If you want to fill up 10 elements in ArrayList you should use the for loop construct as I have posted in my answer. And you would be able to call binaryTreeList.set(1, root) without any Excpetion.. – Vishal K Apr 5 '13 at 20:54

You are attempting to set the element at position 1 when your ArrayList is empty:

binaryTreeList.set(1, root);

Instead just use:

binaryTreeList.add(root);
share|improve this answer
    
But I specifically want the root to be in position 1, not position 0. Also, later on I will want to add elements at various points, not specifically in order. For example, next I might want to add a node to position 8. – Imray Apr 5 '13 at 20:51

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