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I'm working on a subroutine that takes the average of 1 or more arrays. I would like to do this without using a module.

use strict;
use warnings;

use List::Util 'sum';

my @w = (0, 2);
my @x = (1, 3);
my @y = (2, 2);
my @z = (1, 1);

# the average of these four arrays is (1,2) since
# (0+1+2+1)/4 = 1 and (2+3+2+1)/4 = 2    

my @arrays = \(@w, @x, @y, @z);

my @avg;
# this is the way to do it using the module
for my $i (0..$#w) {
    $avg[$i] =  sum(map $_->[$i], @arrays) / @arrays;
}
print "@avg\n";

# my way of doing it without module
@avg;
for my $i (0..$#w) {
    $avg[$i] = prod_sum(map $_->[$i], \@arrays) / @arrays;
}

print "@avg\n";


# subroutines
sub prod_sum{
    my $o = $_[0];
    my $arr_ref = $_[1];
    my $array_ref;

    foreach my $row (@$arr_ref){
        foreach my $cell (@$row) {
            push(@{ $array_ref }, $_);
        }
    }

    my $sum = $o + the_sum($array_ref);
    return $sum;
}

sub the_sum{
    my $sum = 0;
    for ( @{$_[0]} ) {
        $sum += $_;
    }
    return $sum;
}

output

1 2
[pair of really random big numbers]

The first output is correct. It displays the average of all of the arrays. The second output is completely wrong. How do I do this without using a module?

share|improve this question
    
my @avg = Algorithm::Loops::MapCarE { sum(@_)/@_ } \(@w, @x, @y, @z); –  ysth Apr 5 '13 at 20:49
    
can you explain in English what prod_sum is trying to do? I can't quite make it out. in any case, it expects two parameters and you are passing it a single result of a map instead –  ysth Apr 5 '13 at 20:52
    
I'm trying to replicate the sum function in List::Util module. –  cooldood3490 Apr 5 '13 at 20:53
    
can you explain how your code is trying to do that? what is $o used for, what is $arr_ref used for, etc. –  ysth Apr 5 '13 at 21:20
    
it's as @imran said. I thought the sum function in List::Util was taking in two variables so I wrote prod_sum to mimic what I thought it was doing. Apparently sum(map $_->[$i], @arrays) is passing a single result of a map. The sum function is actually only taking in one variable. The prod_sum I wrote above is a recursive sub that will sum an array. –  cooldood3490 Apr 5 '13 at 21:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I propose this solution:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @w = (0, 2);
my @x = (1, 3);
my @y = (2, 2);
my @z = (1, 1);

my @arrays = \(@w, @x, @y, @z);

my ($x, $y) = (0, 0);
foreach my $arr(@arrays) {
    $x += $arr->[0];
    $y += $arr->[1];
}

my @result = ( $x / @arrays,  $y / @arrays);

print "(@result)", "\n";  # <---- prints (1 2)
share|improve this answer
    
how would the code above change if each of the arrays had say 100 elements in them? how would I take the average of that such that the length of the final array @result would be 100. You would need a counter right? –  cooldood3490 Apr 5 '13 at 22:18
    
If you had more than two elements in each array you wouldn't use this solution. –  Borodin Apr 6 '13 at 1:42

You think sum is being passed two variables, it is not. It is only being passed an array. Modify your prod_sum to expect only an array (and replace \@arrays in the call of prod_sum to be just @arrays). Or you can use this:

sub sum {
  return 0 if $#_ < 0;
  my $head = shift;
  return $head + sum(@_);
}

The above is a recursive subroutine that will sum an array.

Note: if your array has more then 100 element, use warnings will emit a deep recursion warning. For more on that topic, see here

share|improve this answer
    
Whatever happened to avoiding recursion if possible? Surely all you need is sub sum { my $sum = 0; $sum += $_ for @_; $sum } –  Zaid Apr 5 '13 at 21:14
    
@Zaid you are right that perl does not optimize tail recursion. –  imran Apr 5 '13 at 21:23

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