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I have two JavaScript arrays:

var array1 = ["Vijendra","Singh"];
var array2 = ["Singh", "Shakya"];

I want the output to be:

var array3 = ["Vijendra","Singh","Shakya"];

The output array should have repeated words removed.

How do I merge two arrays in JavaScript so that I get only the unique items from each array in the same order they were inserted into the original arrays?

share|improve this question

20 Answers 20

up vote 585 down vote accepted

To just merge the arrays (without removing duplicates) use Array.concat:

var array1 = ["Vijendra","Singh"];
var array2 = ["Singh", "Shakya"];

var array3 = array1.concat(array2); // Merges both arrays
// [ 'Vijendra', 'Singh', 'Singh', 'Shakya' ]

Since there is no 'built in' way to remove duplicate (ECMA-262 actually has Array.forEach which would be great for this..), so we do it manually:

Array.prototype.unique = function() {
    var a = this.concat();
    for(var i=0; i<a.length; ++i) {
        for(var j=i+1; j<a.length; ++j) {
            if(a[i] === a[j])
                a.splice(j--, 1);
        }
    }

    return a;
};

Then, to use it:

var array1 = ["Vijendra","Singh"];
var array2 = ["Singh", "Shakya"];
// Merges both arrays and gets unique items
var array3 = array1.concat(array2).unique(); 

This will also preserve the order of the arrays (i.e, no sorting needed).

EDIT:

Since many people are annoyed about prototype augmentation of Array.prototype and for in loops, here is a less invasive way to use it:

function arrayUnique(array) {
    var a = array.concat();
    for(var i=0; i<a.length; ++i) {
        for(var j=i+1; j<a.length; ++j) {
            if(a[i] === a[j])
                a.splice(j--, 1);
        }
    }

    return a;
};

var array1 = ["Vijendra","Singh"];
var array2 = ["Singh", "Shakya"];
    // Merges both arrays and gets unique items
var array3 = arrayUnique(array1.concat(array2));

For those who are fortunate enough to work with progressive browsers where ES5 is available, you can use Object.defineProperty:

Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, 'unique' {
    enumerable: false,
    configurable: false,
    writable: false,
    value: function() {
        var a = this.concat();
        for(var i=0; i<a.length; ++i) {
            for(var j=i+1; j<a.length; ++j) {
                if(a[i] === a[j])
                    a.splice(j--, 1);
            }
        }

        return a;
    }
});
share|improve this answer
68  
Note that this algorithm is O(n^2). –  Gumbo Oct 18 '09 at 8:54
3  
Let [a, b, c] and [x, b, d] be the arrays (assume quotes). concat gives [a, b, c, x, b, d]. Wouldn't the unique()'s output be [a, c, x, b, d]. That doesn't preserve the order I think - I believe OP wants [a, b, c, x, d] –  Amarghosh Oct 18 '09 at 9:04
31  
OP accepted the first answer that got him working and signed off it seems. We are still comparing each others' solutions, finding-n-fixing faults, improving performance, making sure its compatible everywhere and so on... The beauty of stackoverflow :-) –  Amarghosh Oct 18 '09 at 11:10
3  
I originally up-voted this but have changed my mind. Assigning prototypes to Array.prototype has the consequences of breaking "for ... in" statements. So the best solution is probably to use a function like this but not assign it as a prototype. Some people may argue that "for ... in" statements shouldn't be used to iterate array elements anyway, but people often use them that way so at the very least this solution be used with caution. –  Code Commander Feb 2 '11 at 0:49
8  
you should always use for ... in with hasOwnProperty in which case the prototype method is fine –  mulllhausen Jan 1 '13 at 12:17

Time flies when you're having fun. With Underscore or Lo-Dash you can do:

_.union([1, 2, 3], [101, 2, 1, 10], [2, 1]);
=> [1, 2, 3, 101, 10]

http://documentcloud.github.com/underscore/#union

http://lodash.com/docs#union

share|improve this answer
42  
Great answer! +1. Dear reader, please compare this ONE-LINE-ANSWER to all the other answers. Ask yourself, which would be easier to maintain? Then go check out 4k _underscore.js, and use it to reduce the amount of custom JavaScript iterators you may have... all over the place. Hope that helps. All the best! Nash –  ClintNash Jun 23 '12 at 4:33
14  
Or, perhaps even better than underscore, the API-compatible lodash. –  Brian M. Hunt Feb 9 '13 at 15:02
1  
@Ygg From the lodash docs. "Returns a new array of unique values, in order, that are present in one or more of the arrays." –  Richard Ayotte Aug 2 '13 at 0:42
3  
I prefer underscore.js. What I ended up using is underscore.flatten(), which is better than union in that it takes an array of arrays. –  weaver Feb 18 at 23:25
4  
@weaver _.flatten merges, but does not 'de-duplicate'. –  GijsjanB Mar 25 at 11:06

First concatenate the two arrays, next filter out only the unique items.

var a = [1, 2, 3], b = [101, 2, 1, 10];
var c = a.concat(b);
var d = c.filter(function (item, pos) {return c.indexOf(item) == pos});

// d is [1,2,3,101,10]

http://jsfiddle.net/simo/98622/

share|improve this answer
    
Most clear and readable solution so far! –  Alex Oct 5 at 6:43
Array.prototype.merge = function(/* variable number of arrays */){
    for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++){
        var array = arguments[i];
        for(var j = 0; j < array.length; j++){
            if(this.indexOf(array[j]) === -1) {
                this.push(array[j]);
            }
        }
    }
    return this;
};

A much better array merge function.

share|improve this answer
2  
var test = ['a', 'b', 'c']; console.log(test); will print ["a", "b", "c", merge: function] –  Doubidou May 4 at 11:18
    
Excellent solution. I've updated the jsperf test posted above by @slickplaid (jsperf.com/merge-two-arrays-keeping-only-unique-values/3) and it looks like this is the fastest one of them. –  Cobra Aug 8 at 16:14

Why don't you use an object? It looks like you're trying to model a set. This wont preserve the order, however.

var set1 = {"Vijendra":true, "Singh":true}
var set2 = {"Singh":true,  "Shakya":true}

// Merge second object into first
function merge(set1, set2){
  for (var key in set2){
    if (set2.hasOwnProperty(key))
      set1[key] = set2[key]
  }
  return set1
}

merge(set1, set2)

// Create set from array
function setify(array){
  var result = {}
  for (var item in array){
    if (array.hasOwnProperty(item))
      result[array[item]] = true
  }
  return result
}
share|improve this answer
    
Don’t you mean if (!set1.hasOwnProperty(key))? –  Gumbo Oct 18 '09 at 8:56
2  
Why would I mean that? The purpose of that condition is to ignore properties that may be in the object's prototype. –  Nick Retallack Oct 18 '09 at 19:13
//Array.indexOf was introduced in javascript 1.6 (ECMA-262) 
//We need to implement it explicitly for other browsers, 
if (!Array.prototype.indexOf)
{
  Array.prototype.indexOf = function(elt, from)
  {
    var len = this.length >>> 0;

    for (; from < len; from++)
    {
      if (from in this &&
          this[from] === elt)
        return from;
    }
    return -1;
  };
}
//now, on to the problem

var array1 = ["Vijendra","Singh"];
var array2 = ["Singh", "Shakya"];

var merged = array1.concat(array2);
var t;
for(i = 0; i < merged.length; i++)
  if((t = merged.indexOf(i + 1, merged[i])) != -1)
  {
    merged.splice(t, 1);
    i--;//in case of multiple occurrences
  }

Implementation of indexOf method for other browsers is taken from MDC

share|improve this answer
1  
There already is a indexOf method for arrays. –  Gumbo Oct 18 '09 at 8:48
1  
I couldn't find it in w3schools, that's why I wrote it. w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_obj_array.asp Does it take a from parameter btw? –  Amarghosh Oct 18 '09 at 8:51
32  
Seriously - w3schools is a horrible reference. –  meder Oct 18 '09 at 9:10
4  
IE6 doesn't support Array.prototype.indexOf, just paste the support method given by Mozilla so IE doesn't throw an error. –  meder Oct 18 '09 at 9:37
3  
to give reference to meder's comment, www.w3fools.com –  Scott Silvi May 26 '13 at 19:42

Just throwing in my two cents.

function mergeStringArrays(a, b){
    var hash = {};
    var ret = [];

    for(var i=0; i < a.length; i++){
        var e = a[i];
        if (!hash[e]){
            hash[e] = true;
            ret.push(e);
        }
    }

    for(var i=0; i < b.length; i++){
        var e = b[i];
        if (!hash[e]){
            hash[e] = true;
            ret.push(e);
        }
    }

    return ret;
}

This is a method I use a lot, it uses an object as a hashlookup table to do the duplicate checking. Assuming that the hash is O(1), then this runs in O(n) where n is a.length + b.length. I honestly have no idea how the browser does the hash, but it performs well on many thousands of data points.

share|improve this answer
    
Would love it if you could explain more about how this works! I'm struggling to follow your code, simple as it is. Sorry! –  aaronsnoswell Jan 10 '13 at 3:58
    
Never mind - I figured it out. This is neato! –  aaronsnoswell Jan 10 '13 at 4:00
    
That's very clever Mike :) –  Amiga500Kid Mar 8 at 11:09

Take two arrays a and b

var a = ['a','b','c'];

var b = ['d','e','f'];
var c = a.concat(b); 


//c is now an an array with: ['a','b','c','d','e','f']
share|improve this answer
2  
what browsers support concat? –  chovy Dec 22 '13 at 4:37
1  
@chovy - concat is an old method, from ECMAScript 3. You shouldn't have any problem using it. See the compatibility table on the MDN. –  Ian Hunter Dec 30 '13 at 22:54
19  
Does not meet de-duplicate criterion –  hendrix Mar 28 at 13:57

Here is a slightly different take on the loop. With some of the optimizations in the latest version of chrome, it is the fastest method for resolving the union of the two arrays (Chrome 38.0.2111).

http://jsperf.com/merge-two-arrays-keeping-only-unique-values

var array1 = ["Vijendra", "Singh"];
var array2 = ["Singh", "Shakya"];
var array3 = [];

var arr = array1.concat(array2),
  len = arr.length;

while (len--) {
  var itm = arr[len];
  if (array3.indexOf(itm) === -1) {
    array3.unshift(itm);
  }
}

while loop: ~589k ops/s

filter: ~445k ops/s

lodash: 308k ops/s

for loops: 225k ops/s

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the best answer by far –  Dan J Sep 2 at 3:16
    
You don't define array3 anywhere? –  Claus Conrad Sep 4 at 11:44
    
My bad, copied it back over from jsperf and forgot the setup variables. –  slickplaid Sep 4 at 13:02
Array.prototype.add = function(b){
    var a = this.concat();                // clone current object
    if(!b.push || !b.length) return a;    // if b is not an array, or empty, then return a unchanged
    if(!a.length) return b.concat();      // if original is empty, return b

    // go through all the elements of b
    for(var i = 0; i < b.length; i++){
        // if b's value is not in a, then add it
        if(a.indexOf(b[i]) == -1) a.push(b[i]);
    }
    return a;
}

// Example:
console.log([1,2,3].add([3, 4, 5])); // will output [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
share|improve this answer

In Dojo 1.6+

var unique = []; 
var array1 = ["Vijendra","Singh"];
var array2 = ["Singh", "Shakya"];
var array3 = array1.concat(array2); // Merged both arrays

dojo.forEach(array3, function(item) {
    if (dojo.indexOf(unique, item) > -1) return;
    unique.push(item); 
});

Update

See working code.

http://jsfiddle.net/UAxJa/1/

share|improve this answer
1  
Why use dojo just for the forEach function? –  Mészáros Lajos Jul 26 '13 at 11:19
    
Also, you don't need to merge the too arrays. Just loop through the second array and add their values if they don't exist in the first array. –  Mészáros Lajos Jul 26 '13 at 11:23
    
@MészárosLajos No, I would never load Dojo just for the forEach function. I posted this in case someone was already using Dojo. As for the optimization, it's not possible unless you know that the first array contains unique values. –  Richard Ayotte Jul 26 '13 at 16:08
    
Great answer with example. –  mtyson Aug 1 '13 at 19:44

Merge an unlimited number of arrays or non-arrays and keep it unique:

function flatMerge() {
    return Array.prototype.reduce.call(arguments, function (result, current) {
        if (!(current instanceof Array)) {
            if (result.indexOf(current) === -1) {
                result.push(current);
            }
        } else {
            current.forEach(function (value) {
                console.log(value);
                if (result.indexOf(value) === -1) {
                    result.push(value);
                }
            });
        }
        return result;
    }, []);
}

flatMerge([1,2,3], 4, 4, [3, 2, 1, 5], [7, 6, 8, 9], 5, [4], 2, [3, 2, 5]);
// [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8, 9]

flatMerge([1,2,3], [3, 2, 1, 5], [7, 6, 8, 9]);
// [1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 6, 8, 9]

flatMerge(1, 3, 5, 7);
// [1, 3, 5, 7]
share|improve this answer

New solution ( which uses Array.prototype.indexOf and Array.prototype.concat ):

Array.prototype.uniqueMerge = function( a ) {
    for ( var nonDuplicates = [], i = 0, l = a.length; i<l; ++i ) {
        if ( this.indexOf( a[i] ) === -1 ) {
            nonDuplicates.push( a[i] );
        }
    }
    return this.concat( nonDuplicates )
};

Usage:

>>> ['Vijendra', 'Singh'].uniqueMerge(['Singh', 'Shakya'])
["Vijendra", "Singh", "Shakya"]

Array.prototype.indexOf ( for internet explorer ):

Array.prototype.indexOf = Array.prototype.indexOf || function(elt)
  {
    var len = this.length >>> 0;

    var from = Number(arguments[1]) || 0;
    from = (from < 0) ? Math.ceil(from): Math.floor(from); 
    if (from < 0)from += len;

    for (; from < len; from++)
    {
      if (from in this && this[from] === elt)return from;
    }
    return -1;
  };
share|improve this answer
    
@Mender: Thanks it is working... –  Vijjendra Oct 18 '09 at 8:46
    
@Mender: if order is not matter then how I do this –  Vijjendra Oct 18 '09 at 8:46
1  
There already is a indexOf method for arrays. –  Gumbo Oct 18 '09 at 8:49
1  
It's not a standard ECMAScript method defined for Array.prototype, though I'm aware you can easily define it for IE and other browsers which don't support it. –  meder Oct 18 '09 at 8:50
    
I wonder why this got selected instead of mine. –  LiraNuna Oct 18 '09 at 8:50

Here is my solution https://gist.github.com/4692150 with deep equals and easy to use result:

function merge_arrays(arr1,arr2)
{
   ... 
   return {first:firstPart,common:commonString,second:secondPart,full:finalString}; 
}

console.log(merge_arrays(
[
[1,"10:55"] ,
[2,"10:55"] ,
[3,"10:55"]
],[
[3,"10:55"] ,
[4,"10:55"] ,
[5,"10:55"]
]).second);

result:
[
[4,"10:55"] ,
[5,"10:55"]
]
share|improve this answer

Just wrote before for the same reason (works with any amount of arrays):

/**
 * Returns with the union of the given arrays.
 *
 * @param Any amount of arrays to be united.
 * @returns {array} The union array.
 */
function uniteArrays()
{
    var union = [];
    for (var argumentIndex = 0; argumentIndex < arguments.length; argumentIndex++)
    {
        eachArgument = arguments[argumentIndex];
        if (typeof eachArgument !== 'array')
        {
            eachArray = eachArgument;
            for (var index = 0; index < eachArray.length; index++)
            {
                eachValue = eachArray[index];
                if (arrayHasValue(union, eachValue) == false)
                union.push(eachValue);
            }
        }
    }

    return union;
}    

function arrayHasValue(array, value)
{ return array.indexOf(value) != -1; }
share|improve this answer

This is the function I use when I need to merge, (or return the union of) two arrays.

var union = function (a, b) {
  for (var i = 0; i < b.length; i++)
    if (a.indexOf(b[i]) === -1)
      a.push(b[i]);
  return a;
};

var a = [1, 2, 3, 'a', 'b', 'c'];
var b = [2, 3, 4, 'b', 'c', 'd'];

a = union(a, b);
//> [1, 2, 3, "a", "b", "c", 4, "d"]

var array1 = ["Vijendra", "Singh"];
var array2 = ["Singh", "Shakya"];

var array3 = union(array1, array2);
//> ["Vijendra", "Singh", "Shakya"]
share|improve this answer
function set(a, b) {
  return a.concat(b).filter(function(x,i,c) { return c.indexOf(x) == i; });
}
share|improve this answer

Here is about the most effective one, in terms of computation time. Also keeps initial order of elements. First filter all duplicates from second array, then concat what is left to the first one.

var a = [1,2,3];
var b = [5,4,3];
var c = a.concat(b.filter(function(i){
    return a.indexOf(i) == -1;
}));
console.log(c); // [1, 2, 3, 5, 4]

Edit

Here is slightly improved(faster) version of it, with a downside, that arrays must not miss values

var i, c = a.slice(), ci = c.length;
for(i = 0; i < b.length; i++){
    if(c.indexOf(b[i]) == -1) c[ci++] = b[i];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see why this should be more time efficient than LiraNuna's solution. You both use the concat function, and to find unique elements you both have a time complexity of O(n^2). Your solution is, however, fewer lines of code and easier to read. –  Anton Gildebrand Jun 12 at 8:28
    
@AntonGildebrand More useless iterations there. You can check out the comparsion here(open browser console to see): jsbin.com/wabahuha/1/edit?js,output –  AlexTR Jun 12 at 9:05

This is simple and can be done in one line with jquery

var arr1 = ['Vijendra', 'Singh'], arr2 =['Singh', 'Shakya'];

$.unique(arr1.concat(arr2))//one line

["Vijendra", "Singh", "Shakya"]
share|improve this answer

Um ya all good ideas, thanks!

Array.prototype.merge = function (arr) {
    var key;
    for(key in arr) this[key] = arr[key];
};
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't merge arrays—this just overwrites one with another. E.g., var f = [1]; f.merge([2]); –  Ian Hunter Dec 30 '13 at 23:20

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