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I'm new to JS. If I want to assign for example 2 functions to a contructor, do I have to call a function declaration via prototype twice?

function Shape(x, y) {
    this.x= x;
    this.y= y;
}



Shape.prototype.foo= function() {

    return ...;
};

Shape.prototype.bar= function() {

    return ...;
};
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1  
"If I want to assign for example 2 functions to a contructor" I guess you want to assign to functions to the prototype property of a constructor. –  Felix Kling Apr 5 '13 at 21:44
    
what is the end result that you are trying to achieve? the only reason to use prototype is if you are trying to create a class. otherwise an object with methods would be more appropriate. –  Decker W Brower Apr 5 '13 at 21:51
    
@ Decker, I read in a Stackoverflow-thread that assigning functions to the constructor is not elegant, because every object of the constructor then has an own function, which could actually the same one for all of them. It would be redundancy to create it for each object. –  daisy Apr 5 '13 at 22:03
    
Not to the constructor, in the constructor. –  Felix Kling Apr 5 '13 at 22:06
    
@kling Here is why you should use prototype and not write functions inside the constructor: [here the post] stackoverflow.com/questions/7834058/… –  daisy Apr 5 '13 at 22:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do it this way, or you can assign a new object to the prototype (overwriting any existing properties / methods):

Shape.prototype = {
    foo : function(){
    },
    bar : function(){
    }
};

If you're adding lots of methods to different prototypes and you don't want to overwrite the entire prototype object, define a helper method to do the asignment for you:

function addToPrototype(constructor, obj){
    for (var prop in obj){
        constructor.prototype[prop] = obj[prop];
    }
}

addToPrototype(Shape, {
    foo : function(){
    },
    bar : function(){
    }
});

addToPrototype(Shape, {
    something : function(){
    }
});

addToPrototype(Polygon, {
    somethingElse : function(){
    }
});
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1  
Personally, I'm against this, as addToPrototype(Shape, {..}) is longer than Shape.prototype and makes it even more confusing for anyone looking at your code if you do something like this. –  Niall Apr 5 '13 at 21:54
    
@Niall - I chose a random name, but it's really just a way of using mixins (eg javascriptweblog.wordpress.com/2011/05/31/…). Lets you add methods to any prototype in a concise way without wiping the entire object. Many libraries have something similar that's chainable, but yeah probably overcomplicated for this question.. –  Graham Apr 5 '13 at 22:00

If I understand you correctly, something like this will work:

function Shape(x, y) {
    this.x= x;
    this.y= y;
}

Shape.prototype = {
    constructor: Shape,
    foo: function() {
        return ...;
    },
    bar: function() {
        return ...;
    }
}

http://jsfiddle.net/Yc4V4/

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1  
Because you're overwriting the Shape prototype for completeness you should to include constructor: Shape, in the overwriting object. –  louisbros Apr 5 '13 at 22:07
    
@louisbros I got an edit suggesting this indeed, it was from you actually right? That got rejected by a moderator, trying to see why, if it was for no reason I'll add it in :) Wouldn't this throw an unexpected } error though? Wait never mind –  Niall Apr 5 '13 at 22:13
    
Don't see why that should get rejected. console.log(new Shape(1, 2).constructor); before and after the prototype overwrite demonstrates why. –  louisbros Apr 5 '13 at 22:33
    
I completely agree with you, thats why I added it back in, and it in one line does what the actual accepted answer does through a function. I'm just sorry you didn't get the rep points! –  Niall Apr 5 '13 at 22:39

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