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When attemptiing to solve the below assignment :

Using the Arithmetic operators ( +,-,*,/) rearrange four fives to equal the number 1 to 10.

Example : 5/5+5-5 =1 ,5/5+5/5=2

I tried in C# without using Linq (I don't know how to proceed further)

public void GetDetails()
{

   char[] sym = new char[] { '+', '-', '/', '*' };

   int[] AOf5 = new int[] { 5, 5, 5, 5 };


for (int i = 0; i <4; i++)
 {
    for (int j = 0; j <4; j++)
     {
       for (int k = 0; k <4; k++)
          {
             for (int l = 0; l < 4; l++)
              {

                int result1 = AOf5[0] + sym[i] + AOf5[1] + sym[j] +
                AOf5[2] + sym[k] + AOf5[3];

               int result2 = AOf5[0] + sym[i] + AOf5[1] + sym[j] +
               AOf5[2] + sym[l] + AOf5[3];

              int result3 = AOf5[0] + sym[i] + AOf5[1] +
              sym[k] + AOf5[2] + sym[l] + AOf5[3];
              ....
              ....

              }  

         }

      }
  }

}

I am unable to complete it without linq and using linq.Expecting you help.

share|improve this question
    
So basically, you are iterating through all the possible permutations and picking out those that give the right answers and the build the string that represent the arithmetics? Care to share how you did it with LINQ? –  o.k.w Oct 18 '09 at 9:38
    
Just out of curiosity: Has anyone managed to get ways of generating 3..8? My small test with PowerShell only yielded results for 1, 2, 9 and 10. –  Joey Oct 18 '09 at 9:50
    
is it allowed to use brackets? (5*5+5)/5 == 6, (5+5+5)/5 == 3 –  andyp Oct 18 '09 at 10:08
    
I don't know the true meaning of the keyword "rearrange", but i think we should consider brackets and operation order. –  Alex Bagnolini Oct 18 '09 at 10:30
    
There is no solution for 8, right? I'm pretty sure I did an exhaustive search and 8 never showed up. –  Joren Oct 18 '09 at 10:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Applying left-to-right (no precedence), I can get:

1: ((5+5)-5)/5
2:
3: ((5+5)+5)/5
4: ((5*5)-5)/5
5: ((5-5)*5)+5
6: ((5*5)+5)/5
7: ((5+5)/5)+5
8:
9:
10: ((5+5)+5)-5

With (edit: oops - the "no div" stuff was unnecessary):

    var operators = new[] {
          new { Name = "+", Func = (Func<decimal,decimal,decimal>)((x,y)=>x+y) },
          new { Name = "-", Func = (Func<decimal,decimal,decimal>)((x,y)=>x-y) },
          new { Name = "/", Func = (Func<decimal,decimal,decimal>)((x,y)=>x/y) },
          new { Name = "*", Func = (Func<decimal,decimal,decimal>)((x,y)=>x*y) }
      };
    var options = from i in Enumerable.Range(1, 10)
                  select new {i, op=(
                    from op1 in operators
                    let v1 = op1.Func(5,5)
                    from op2 in operators
                    let v2 = op2.Func(v1, 5)
                    from op3 in operators
                    let v3 = op3.Func(v2,5)
                    where v3 == i
                    select "((5" + op1.Name + "5)" + op2.Name + "5)"
                       + op3.Name + "5").FirstOrDefault()};
    foreach (var opt in options)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(opt.i + ": " + opt.op);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
@Marc: Your concept is the way to go, though I'm quite certain, some operations were left out: "((5+5)/5)*5 = 10", "((5/5)+5)-5 = 1" etc. Perpahs yours is > 1 and < 10? –  o.k.w Oct 18 '09 at 10:24
    
This doesn't cover: 9 = (5+5) - (5/5); and 2 = (5/5) + (5/5). –  Alex Bagnolini Oct 18 '09 at 10:24
    
@Alex: (5+5)-(5/5) is using rule of precedence. Marc already specified his algo is left-to-right, no precedence. –  o.k.w Oct 18 '09 at 10:30
    
@o.k.w: note the "FirstOrDefault()". He takes the first one matching the result wanted. Plus, author clearly showed he wants rules of precedence, as provided in his second example "5/5+5/5=2", which would give "1.2" with no precedence. –  Alex Bagnolini Oct 18 '09 at 10:33
    
+1 just for making the effort to come up with an answer! –  RichardOD Oct 18 '09 at 10:34

I did it in a primitive way which I am not sure if the answer is correct. It is easier done in a spreadsheet though. Basically I modified linqfying's codes to generate codes.

Here is it:

public static void GetDetails()
{
    int ctr = 0;
    char[] sym = new char[] { '+', '-', '/', '*' };
    string num = "5";
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
        {
            for (int k = 0; k < 4; k++)
            {
                for (int l = 0; l < 4; l++)
                {
                    ctr++;
                    string str = num + sym[i] + num + sym[j] + num + sym[k] + num;
                    Console.WriteLine("res = " + str + "; ");
                    Console.WriteLine("if(res>=1 && res<=10)");
                    Console.WriteLine("Console.WriteLine(\"" + str + "\");");
                }

            }

        }
    }
    //Console.WriteLine("Total:" + ctr.ToString());
}

It generates 256 sets of operations which I output to a text file, copied and pasted them into a new method:

public static void runit()
{
    float res = 0;
    res = 5+5+5+5;
    if (res >= 1 && res <= 10)
        Console.WriteLine("5+5+5+5");
    res = 5+5+5+5;
    if (res >= 1 && res <= 10)
        Console.WriteLine("5+5+5+5");
    res = 5+5+5+5;
    if (res >= 1 && res <= 10)
        Console.WriteLine("5+5+5+5");
    //......
    //......
    //......
    //......
    res = 5*5*5*5;
    if (res >= 1 && res <= 10)
        Console.WriteLine("5*5*5*5");

}

And run it again which I get 76 non-unqiue operations which fits between 1 and 10. And 19 unique ones here (left to right operations only):

5*5/5/5
5*5/5+5
5/5*5/5
5/5*5+5
5/5/5+5
5/5+5/5
5/5+5-5
5/5-5+5
5+5*5/5
5+5/5*5
5+5/5/5
5+5/5-5
5+5+5-5
5+5-5/5
5+5-5+5
5-5/5/5
5-5/5+5
5-5+5/5
5-5+5+5

I'm sure someone can come out with something more creative :P

To add:

I realised after matching with Marc's answer, the initial loops didn't cover all permutations, my answers ain't gonna be right. But since I already spent quite some time, I'll let it stay. :P

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate your effort .Thanks a lot my friend –  user190560 Oct 18 '09 at 10:20
    
@linqfying:No problem, take Marc's one and tweak a bit, you should get it. But if you want to avoid LINQ totally, you have got to tweak somemore. –  o.k.w Oct 18 '09 at 10:26
    
Yes without Linq I am working out.Once finished i will post it.Now i am working on another interesting problem.Thanks for your response :) –  user190560 Oct 18 '09 at 10:29

The only missing cases in Marc's solution are the ones with operation precedence like in: 5/5+5/5. I added them in an union and here is the correct query.
Marc, if you update your answer with the code below (if you think it's correct) i'll delete this answer:

var operators = new[] {
              new { Name = "+", Func = (Func<decimal,decimal,decimal>)((x,y)=>x+y) },
              new { Name = "-", Func = (Func<decimal,decimal,decimal>)((x,y)=>x-y) },
              new { Name = "/", Func = (Func<decimal,decimal,decimal>)((x,y)=>x/y) },
              new { Name = "*", Func = (Func<decimal,decimal,decimal>)((x,y)=>x*y) }
          };

var options = from i in Enumerable.Range(1, 10)
              select new
              {
                  i,
                  op = (
                      from op1 in operators
                      let v1 = op1.Func(5, 5)
                      from op2 in operators
                      let v2 = op2.Func(v1, 5)
                      from op3 in operators
                      let v3 = op3.Func(v2, 5)
                      where v3 == i
                      select "((5" + op1.Name + "5)" + op2.Name + "5)"
                         + op3.Name + "5")
                      .Union(
             //calculate 2 operations (the left and the right one),  
             //then operate them together.
                        from op1 in operators
                        let v1 = op1.Func(5, 5)
                        from op2 in operators
                        let v2 = op2.Func(5, 5)
                        from op3 in operators
                        let v3 = (op3.Name == "/" && v2 == 0) ? null : (int?)op3.Func(v1, v2)
                        where v3 == i
                        select "(5" + op1.Name + "5)" + op2.Name + "(5"
                             + op3.Name + "5)"
                      ).FirstOrDefault()
              };

foreach (var opt in options)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(opt.i + ": " + opt.op);
        }

EDIT:
A couple words about let v3 = (op3.Name == "/" && v2 == 0) ? null : (int?)op3.Func(v1, v2): this is an awfully working way to avoid divisions by 0 (which can occur, because you can divide by (5-5)).

I am pretty sure you can filter it in a better way but i left it to enphasize that this problem CAN occur.

share|improve this answer

Assuming you DON'T want to use LINQ, here is an approach to do an implementation. That said it is horribly unoptimized, and I'd recommend a much shorter LINQ implementation over it. (See: Marc Gravell's post.)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace MathIterator
{
  class Program
  {
    static readonly int[] _inputs = new int[] { 5, 5, 5, 5 };
    static readonly char[] _operations = new char[] { '+', '-', '*', '/' };
    static Dictionary<int, List<string>> _calculations = new Dictionary<int, List<string>>();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      StartPermutation();
      PrintResults();
    }

    static void StartPermutation()
    {
      if (_inputs.Length > 0)
        Permute(1 /*index*/, _inputs[0], _inputs[0].ToString());    
    }

    static void Permute(int index, int result, string computation)
    {
      if (index == _inputs.Length)
      {
        if (!_calculations.ContainsKey(result))
        {
          _calculations[result] = new List<string>();
        }

        _calculations[result].Add(computation);
      }
      else
      {
        foreach (char operation in _operations)
        {
          string nextComputation = String.Format("({0} {1} {2})",computation, operation, _inputs[index]);
          int nextResult = result;

          switch (operation)
          {
            case '+':
              nextResult += _inputs[index];
              break;
            case '-':
              nextResult -= _inputs[index];
              break;
            case '*':
              nextResult *= _inputs[index];
              break;
            case '/':
              nextResult /= _inputs[index];
              break;
          }

          Permute(
            index + 1,
            nextResult,
            nextComputation);
        }
      }
    }

    static void PrintResults()
    {
      for (int i = 1; i <= 10; ++i)
      {
        if (_calculations.ContainsKey(i))
        {
          Console.WriteLine("Found {0} entries for key {1}", _calculations[i].Count, i);

          foreach (string calculation in _calculations[i])
          {
            Console.WriteLine(i + " = " + calculation);
          }
        }
        else
        {
          Console.WriteLine("No entry for key: " + i);
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

Here is another implementation. This one follows order of precedence. Again, I do not recommend solving it like this. Even more-so now given the wide dash hacks (to distinguish them from minus signs), but it does seem to work.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace MathIterator
{
  class Program
  {
    static readonly int[] _inputs = new[] { 5, 5, 5, 5 };
    //HUGE hack, the '–' is a wide dash NOT a hyphen.
    static readonly char[][] _operationLevels = new[] { new[] { '*', '/' }, new[] { '+', '–' } };
    static List<string> _calculations = new List<string>();
    static Dictionary<int, List<string>> _results = new Dictionary<int, List<string>>();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      StartPermutation();
      StartEvaluateCalculations();
      PrintResults();
    }

    static void StartPermutation()
    {
      if (_inputs.Length > 0)
        Permute(1 /*index*/, _inputs[0].ToString());    
    }

    static void Permute(int index, string computation)
    {
      if (index == _inputs.Length)
      {
        _calculations.Add(computation);
      }
      else
      {
        foreach (char[] operationLevel in _operationLevels)
        {
          foreach (char operation in operationLevel)
          {
            string nextComputation = String.Format("{0} {1} {2}", computation, operation, _inputs[index]);
            Permute(
              index + 1,
              nextComputation);
          }
        }
      }
    }

    static void StartEvaluateCalculations()
    {
      foreach (string calculation in _calculations)
      {
        int? result = EvaluateCalculation(calculation);

        if (result != null)
        {
          int intResult = (int) result;

          if (!_results.ContainsKey(intResult))
          {
            _results[intResult] = new List<string>();
          }

          _results[intResult].Add(calculation);            
        }
      }
    }

    static int? EvaluateCalculation(string calculation)
    {
      foreach (char[] operationLevel in _operationLevels)
      {
        string[] results = calculation.Split(operationLevel, 2);

        if (results.Length == 2)
        {
          int hitIndex = results[0].Length;

          Regex firstDigit = new Regex(@"^ -?\d+");
          Regex lastDigit = new Regex(@"-?\d+ $");

          string firstMatch = lastDigit.Match(results[0]).Value;
          int arg1 = int.Parse(firstMatch);

          string lastMatch = firstDigit.Match(results[1]).Value; 
          int arg2 = int.Parse(lastMatch);

          int result = 0;

          switch (calculation[hitIndex])
          {
            case '+':
              result = arg1 + arg2;
              break;
            //HUGE hack, the '–' is a wide dash NOT a hyphen.
            case '–':
              result = arg1 - arg2;
              break;
            case '*':
              result = arg1 * arg2;
              break;
            case '/':
              if ((arg2 != 0) && ((arg1 % arg2) == 0))
              {
                result = arg1 / arg2;
                break;
              }
              else
              {
                return null;
              }
          }

          string prePiece = calculation.Remove(hitIndex - 1 - arg1.ToString().Length);
          string postPiece = calculation.Substring(hitIndex + 1 + lastMatch.ToLower().Length);

          string nextCalculation = prePiece + result + postPiece;
          return EvaluateCalculation(nextCalculation);
        }
      }

      return int.Parse(calculation);
    }

    static void PrintResults()
    {
      for (int i = 1; i <= 10; ++i)
      {
        if (_results.ContainsKey(i))
        {
          Console.WriteLine("Found {0} entries for key {1}", _results[i].Count, i);

          foreach (string calculation in _results[i])
          {
            Console.WriteLine(i + " = " + calculation);
          }
        }
        else
        {
          Console.WriteLine("No entry for key: " + i);
        }
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Rob: I ran your codes, 21 unique results. Looks promising! Though still lacking the precedence rule. Well done anyway. –  o.k.w Oct 18 '09 at 10:52
    
Whoa, that certainly beats my fiddling here by size :-) ... $ops="+","-","*","/";1..10|%{$res=$_; $ops|%{$o1=$_; $ops|%{$o2=$_; $ops|%{$o3=$_; "((5 $o1 5) $o2 5) $o3 5"}}}|?{(iex $_) -eq $res}|%{"$_ = $res"}} –  Joey Oct 18 '09 at 11:32

Here's a solution which is completely LINQ based (method-syntax) and late-evaluating, which handles all permutations (not only left-to-righ):

static void Main()
{
    var solution = PermuteLength(4)
        .Where(p => Decimal.Floor(p.Value) == p.Value)
        .Where(p => p.Value <= 10 && p.Value >= 0)
        .OrderBy(p => p.Value);

    foreach (var p in solution)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(p.Formula + " = " + p.Value);
    }
}

public static Operator[] Operators = new[]
    {
        new Operator {Format = "({0} + {1})", Function = (x, y) => x + y},
        new Operator {Format = "({0} - {1})", Function = (x, y) => x - y},
        new Operator {Format = "({1} - {0})", Function = (x, y) => y - x},
        new Operator {Format = "({0} * {1})", Function = (x, y) => x * y},
        new Operator {Format = "({0} / {1})", Function = (x, y) => y == 0 ? 0 : x / y},
        new Operator {Format = "({1} / {0})", Function = (x, y) => x == 0 ? 0 : y / x},
    };

public static IEnumerable<Permutation> BasePermutation = new[] { new Permutation {Formula = "5", Value = 5m} };

private static IEnumerable<Permutation> PermuteLength(int length)
{
    if (length <= 1)
        return BasePermutation;

    var result = Enumerable.Empty<Permutation>();

    for (int i = 1; i <= length / 2; i++)
        result = result.Concat(Permute(PermuteLength(i), PermuteLength(length - i)));

    return result;
}

private static IEnumerable<Permutation> Permute(IEnumerable<Permutation> left, IEnumerable<Permutation> right)
{
    IEnumerable<IEnumerable<IEnumerable<Permutation>>> product = left.Select(l => right.Select(r => ApplyOperators(l, r)));

    var aggregate =
        product.Aggregate(Enumerable.Empty<IEnumerable<Permutation>>(), (result, item) => result.Concat(item)).
            Aggregate(Enumerable.Empty<Permutation>(), (result, item) => result.Concat(item));

    return aggregate;
}

private static IEnumerable<Permutation> ApplyOperators(Permutation left, Permutation right)
{
    return Operators.Select(o => new Permutation
    {
        Formula = string.Format(o.Format, left.Formula, right.Formula),
        Value = o.Function(left.Value, right.Value)
    });
}

public struct Permutation
{
    public string Formula;
    public decimal Value;
}

public struct Operator
{
    public string Format;
    public Func<decimal, decimal, decimal> Function;
}

Known problems: Some solutions are duplicate, Doesn't handle division-by-zero very well, so some wrong answers (I've assumed anything divided by zero = 0)

Edit: A part of result:

((5 / 5) / (5 / 5)) = 1

((5 / 5) + (5 / 5)) = 2

((5 + (5 + 5)) / 5) = 3

(5 - ((5 + 5) / 5)) = 3

(((5 * 5) - 5) / 5) = 4

(5 + (5 * (5 - 5))) = 5

(5 - (5 * (5 - 5))) = 5

(5 + ((5 - 5) / 5)) = 5

(5 - ((5 - 5) / 5)) = 5

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your effort –  user190560 Oct 18 '09 at 15:00

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