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I want to write a command, this command would have this format:

[range]MyCMD[!] [count] [oneArg] [flags]

or

[range]MyCMD[!] [oneArg] [count] [flags]

similiar to

:[range]P[rint] [count] [flags]

or

:[range]d[elete] [x] {count}

The command MyCMD eventually will call a function to do some work. I wrote this line (won't work)

command! -nargs=+ -range -bang -count=0  MyCMD <line1>,<line2>call MyFUNC(<q-args>, "<bang>","<count>", .... ..)

Here the problem is, how to handle those arguments:

  • problem 1 I read about the help, -range and -count cannot not be used at same time, but I need them both. I also took a look some vim commands, like :delete, :print, when we use those commands, we could give both range and count. Also I found that vim doc has two entries of same command if a {count} or [count] is available. like:

    :[range]d[elete] [x]    
    :[range]d[elete] [x] {count}
    

or

:[range]p[rint] [flags]
:[range]p[rint] {count} [flags]

why is that? why not just with [count] ? (this would be another small question)

  • problem 2 from my design, all those arguments are optional, they have default values(see the table below). How can I pass those arguments to function (I checked <q-args> and <f-args>) and how can I distinguish which user-inputs are for which argument? for example user gives

    :MyCMD 5 g

     5 is count? or arg? 
     g is arg or flag?
     or '5 g' is arg? 
    

here is the default values for args:

    argName | Default value | description
    -------------------------------------
    range   | current line  | this could be get by function xxx ( ) range
    count   | 0             | this could be get by <count>
    bang    | ""            | this is easy too, with <bang>
    arg     | " "           | this argument could have space
    flags   | ""            | no space allowed for flags
    -------------------------------------

thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For your complex custom command, you cannot rely solely on Vim's limited parsing options; you can have it handle the range with -range, but have to parse your combination of arguments yourself.

:command! -nargs=* -range -bang MyCMD <line1>,<line2>call MyFUNC(<bang>0, <q-args>)

Inside MyFUNC (which should probably be defined with :function MyFUNC( ... ) range to be invoked only once), split() the arguments on whitespace. Alternatively, you could define the function to use a variable number of arguments and use <f-args>, but note that the number of function arguments is limited (to 20 IIRC).

The <bang>0 is a nice trick to transform the bang into a boolean, which is usually what you need.

share|improve this answer
    
thx Ingo!. yes, I would parse the args in my function, but I don't know the right way. there are 3 args need to be parsed. count, arg and flags. all are optional. maybe I should define some format, e.g. for "arg", the value must be wrapped by quote, since spaces are allowed... that could be a little bit easier, then check number or flags string.. or break one command into more commands, this would be the last choice I would do. any more suggestions? –  Kent Apr 6 '13 at 17:28
    
and do you know the reason of that "another small question" in my post? I searched answer for my problem yesterday, and just noticed that. thank you. –  Kent Apr 6 '13 at 17:30
    
If your arguments are too ambiguous to be parsed, I'd rethink the syntax; maybe enforce more uniformity or give additional hints what type it is with sigils. –  Ingo Karkat Apr 6 '13 at 18:53
1  
There's a difference in what built-in commands can handle and what is exposed as parsing options for custom :commands; you're treading way beyond the usual uses of custom commands, so all the complexity for parsing is on you. –  Ingo Karkat Apr 6 '13 at 18:54
    
finally I parsed the arguments in my function...your answer (and comments) didn't solve my problem directly, but gave me useful information .so I accept this as answer. thank you! –  Kent Apr 9 '13 at 21:20

Have to ask tough questions. I don't really have any solutions but here are my findings.

:command! -range -bang -nargs=* MY echo [<bang>0, <line1>, <line2>, <count>, <q-args>]

After running the following scenarios:

:MY
[0, 3, 3, -1, '']
:MY!
[1, 3, 3, -1, '']
:%MY
[0, 1, 10, 10, '']
:%MY 4
[0, 1, 10, 10, '4']
:MY 4
[0, 3, 3, -1, '4']
:%MY flag
[0, 1, 10, 10, 'flag']
:MY flag
[0, 3, 3, -1, 'flag']
:%MY 4 flag
[0, 1, 10, 10, '4 flag']

Now with -count instead of -range

:command! -count -bang -nargs=* MY echo [<bang>0, <line1>, <line2>, <count>, <q-args>]

Results:

:MY
[0, 3, 1, 0, '']
:MY!
[1, 3, 1, 0, '']
:%MY
[0, 1, 10, 10, '']
:%MY 4
[0, 1, 4, 4, '']
:MY 4
[0, 3, 4, 4, '']
:%MY flag
[0, 1, 10, 10, 'flag']
:MY flag
[0, 3, 1, 0, 'flag']
:%MY 4 flag
[0, 1, 4, 4, 'flag']

As you can see it doesn't easy. My suggestion would be to use -range with your command. And then parse the <q-args> looking for a number via \d\+.

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thanks, Peter. looking for \d+ is not enough, since the arg could be any string, including number, spaces. –  Kent Apr 6 '13 at 17:31

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