Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
# this code works
list = (0..20).to_a
# => [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20] 

odd = list.select { |x| x.odd? }
# => [1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19] 

list.reject! { |x| x.odd? }
# => [0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20] 

# but can i emulate this type of functionality with an enumerable method?
set = [1,5,10]
# => [1, 5, 10] 
one, five, ten = set
# => [1, 5, 10] 
one
# => 1 
five
# => 5 
ten
# => 10

# ------------------------------------------------
# method I am looking for ?
list = (0..20).to_a
odd, even = list.select_with_reject { |x| x.odd? }
# put the matching items into the first variable
# and the non-matching into the second
share|improve this question
    
Built in methods are nice, but are you opposed to adding your own method to Array that would do this? –  MrDanA Apr 5 '13 at 23:47
    
yes, i was thinking about monkey patching Array to add it - seems like something ruby might already have built in, but didn't see anything in the docs –  house9 Apr 5 '13 at 23:50
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Sure, you can do:

odd, even = list.partition &:odd?
share|improve this answer
    
awesome - thanks; interesting it shows up on the enumerable docs - ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.2/Enumerable.html but not on array? –  house9 Apr 5 '13 at 23:59
1  
@house9 Enumerable is a mixin, so many classes can use it. Hashes use them too. –  MrDanA Apr 6 '13 at 4:57
    
That's because it is defined on Enumerable but not on Array. This is called inheritance and is one of the fundamental concepts of Ruby and many other languages, not just object-oriented ones. –  Jörg W Mittag Apr 6 '13 at 7:51
add comment
odd = []
even = []
list = [1..20]
list.each {|x| x.odd? ? odd << x : even << x }
share|improve this answer
add comment

As pguardiario said, the partition method is the most direct way. You could also use Set#divide:

require 'set'
list = (1..10).to_a
odd, even = Set.new(list).divide(&:odd?).to_a.map{|x| x.to_a}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could try below:

odd,even = (0..20).group_by(&:odd?).values
p odd,even

Output:

[0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20]
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.