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Is there a way to get a syntax type to define keyboard shortcuts, or to set a keyboard shortcut to depend on the syntax type (perhaps under the "context") setting?

My quoted lists '(1 2 3) get entered in like this: '(1 2 3)' because Sublime applies this helpful (but not in this case) behavior.

Here is the relevant bit of the Default (OSX).sublime-keymap file

// Auto-pair single quotes
{ "keys": ["'"], "command": "insert_snippet", "args": {"contents": "'$0'"}, "context":
    [
        { "key": "setting.auto_match_enabled", "operator": "equal", "operand": true },
        { "key": "selection_empty", "operator": "equal", "operand": true, "match_all": true },
        { "key": "following_text", "operator": "regex_contains", "operand": "^(?:\t| |\\)|]|\\}|>|$)", "match_all": true },
        { "key": "preceding_text", "operator": "not_regex_contains", "operand": "['a-zA-Z0-9_]$", "match_all": true },
        { "key": "eol_selector", "operator": "not_equal", "operand": "string.quoted.single", "match_all": true }
    ]
},
{ "keys": ["'"], "command": "insert_snippet", "args": {"contents": "'${0:$SELECTION}'"}, "context":
    [
        { "key": "setting.auto_match_enabled", "operator": "equal", "operand": true },
        { "key": "selection_empty", "operator": "equal", "operand": false, "match_all": true }
    ]
},
{ "keys": ["'"], "command": "move", "args": {"by": "characters", "forward": true}, "context":
    [
        { "key": "setting.auto_match_enabled", "operator": "equal", "operand": true },
        { "key": "selection_empty", "operator": "equal", "operand": true, "match_all": true },
        { "key": "following_text", "operator": "regex_contains", "operand": "^'", "match_all": true }
    ]
},
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should be able to, though it's kind of a pain. First, you will have to disable the built in auto pairing (don't worry, when we are finished, auto pairing for everything else should work). To do this, set the following in your user settings.

"auto_match_enabled": false

Then add the following to your settings.

"my_auto_match_enabled": false

Next, we need to add a new set of keybindings. I only did one from what you posted, but I'll explain what I did since it may not be obvious.

{ "keys": ["'"], "command": "insert_snippet", "args": {"contents": "'${0:$SELECTION}'"}, "context":
    [
        { "key": "setting.my_auto_match_enabled", "operator": "equal", "operand": true },
        { "key": "selection_empty", "operator": "equal", "operand": false, "match_all": true },
        { "key": "selector", "operator": "not_equal", "operand": "source.clojure", "match_all": true }
    ]
}

First, note that I switched the first context key from setting.auto_match_enabled to setting.my_auto_match_enabled. Next, I added the last context entry which will limit the scope. With this, the snippet will only run when you are not in a source.clojure scope. You may have to modify this as I don't know what the scope name in clojure is, I just guessed =). You will have to do this for all of your single quote entries. Now, because we disabled the built in auto pairing, we have to readd all of those entries as well. In these entries, we will again change setting.auto_match_enabled to setting.my_auto_match_enabled. After that, everything should work. Note it doesn't actually have to be my_auto_match_enabled, that's just what I chose. You may change it as you see fit.

With all that being said, I didn't completely test all of this, so comment if you run into issues.

Explanation:

So now you might be asking yourself, why do I need to disable the built in auto matching code? Well here's the answer. Even if we were to block the auto complete in our user settings, using a similar scoping rule, it would still fall back to the default, thus inserting the auto paired quotes regardless of what we do in the user folder. Now you might be thinking, but what if we modify the default settings file. Though we could do this, again inserting that same context setting, we would have to make sure to restore that file on any subsequent updates. So I guess in the end it is up to you. If you edit the default file, just keep in mind that if you ever need to revert, you will have to change the file again.

Sublime Text 3:

In ST3, you can perform the actually modify the "default" file. This is due to a change in how packages are loaded in ST3. Rather than needing to be extracted to the Packages folder, plugins are run directly from the .sublime-package files (which are just renamed zips). In addition, any file in the Packages directory takes precedence over the .sublime-package file. So, in ST3, you would create Packages/Default/Default (your os here).sublime-keymap, and add the context line. It is safe from any subsequent updates as updates no longer modify the Packages directory.

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Is there no easier way? could you maybe put a sentence or two about why not continuing to use auto_match_enabled? –  Steven Lu Apr 6 '13 at 6:02
    
Funny I was thinking I should explain that. Anyways, I updated the answer. I also added an alternative option, where you could edit the default file. The only thing to note is that if you ever have to revert or do any kind of update, the file may get wiped out. Though ST2 doesn't look like it will receive any updates, so it may be okay. Editing the default file would simply involve adding that selector context to the default entries. –  skuroda Apr 6 '13 at 8:41
    
Well i'll most definitely be on ST3 but I may do some work on Windows in ST2. It should be possible to override a default keymapping by simply redeclaring it in the user file. –  Steven Lu Apr 6 '13 at 8:53
    
You actually don't want it to just override it in the User directory. If you did that, you are basically saying you want one and only one key binding for any key combination (which defeats the purpose of having context). Things are much simpler if you are using ST3, and I've added an explanation to the answer since it felt to long for a comment. Out of curiosity, why wouldn't you use ST3 only on Windows? –  skuroda Apr 6 '13 at 16:17
    
Oh, okay I think I get what you're saying. The behavior of ST is such that if you define the entry twice (once in the default map and once in your user map), it'll basically look through the first one because it was defined regardless of the context conditions of the second one... i.e. it does not "overwrite the setting" so to speak. It is because of this that we need the second setting variable so that we can still use the original variable to toggle the default normal behavior (which is completely agnostic to the use of clojure). –  Steven Lu Apr 6 '13 at 19:48

I did this simple thing:
Put this:

// Singlequote for lisp
{ "keys": ["'"], "command": "insert_snippet", "args": {"contents": "'"}, "context":
    [
        { "key": "selector", "operator": "equal", "operand": "source.lisp"}
    ]
},

in your user-keys-bindings

EDIT: There's still one unusual case in this scenario: '|' (pipe represents caret), after pressing backspace, it would still delete both singlequotes.

Add this to your keybindings, if you want to disable it:

{ "keys": ["backspace"], "command": "left_delete", "context":
    [
        { "key": "setting.auto_match_enabled", "operator": "equal", "operand": true },
        { "key": "selection_empty", "operator": "equal", "operand": true, "match_all": true },
        { "key": "preceding_text", "operator": "regex_contains", "operand": "'$", "match_all": true },
        { "key": "following_text", "operator": "regex_contains", "operand": "^'", "match_all": true },
        { "key": "selector", "operator": "equal", "operand": "source.lisp"}
    ]
},

IMPORTANT NOTE: As stated by pickwick in comments, you should - of course - change "source.lisp" to "source.<lisp-of-your-choice>", or rather to "source.<name-of-syntax-of-your-choice>", or even rather-er, "source.<name-of-scope-the-syntax-you're-using-is-using>". ScopeAlways plugin can show you the correct name of scope, but it's very likely going to be something like "source.lisp" for CL, "source.clojure" for clojure, maybe "source.scheme" if you hang out with the cool kids, etc...

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could you explain what this does? thanks –  Steven Lu May 9 '13 at 2:58
    
In sublime text, automatching is done by keybindings on ', ", [, { and (, with couple clever rules, inserting "inline snippets" (don't know how to call it, it's snippet defined inside the keybinding file) The snippet above overwrites all keybindings on singlequote, in case you type it in source.lisp context (lisp syntax highlighting). –  enrey May 9 '13 at 11:00
    
And of course, it overwrites it with the original meaning of singlequote key - "inserting one single quote" –  enrey May 9 '13 at 11:08
    
So that first binding basically disables the smart insertion for single-quotes? –  Steven Lu May 9 '13 at 14:59
2  
It worked for me after changing "source.lisp" to "source.clojure". thanks –  pickwick Apr 22 at 21:48

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