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I am trying to understand |= in c++, I have sample code

 int x = 0 ;

 x |= 3;
 std::cout<<x <<std::endl;

 x |= 6;
 std::cout<<x <<std::endl;

output is :

3
7

how is this possible, is it related to bit addition??

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marked as duplicate by James McLaughlin, Alexey Frunze, chris, Loki Astari, Jim Balter Apr 6 '13 at 0:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You could have answered this by looking at a list of C++ operators and then googling the name. –  chris Apr 6 '13 at 0:19
1  
What you are referring to is a bitwise OR operator. It compares all the bits then the result contains the most significant bit (1, 0) of the two operands. For example: 1111000 | 0000111 = 1111111 It is not a bit addition, try x = 72 | 184 ==> x = 248 –  DOOM Apr 6 '13 at 0:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Its a bitwise OR.

First case:

0011(3 in decimal)
0000(0 in decimal) 

So, the OR of both is:

0011 OR 0000 = 0011

= 2^0 + 2^1 
= 3 

For second case, the OR works as follows:

0011 (3 in decimal) 
0110 (6 in decimal)

Output of OR is 0111 which in decimal is:

0011 OR 0110 = 0111

= 2^0 + 2^1 + 2^2 
= 1+2+4 
= 7
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It is a bitwise or and assignment. It is the same as x = x | 3.

In binary bitwise or is equivalent to "if it's a 1 in either number it will be a 1 in the result". So x |= 3 makes 3. Then x is 11 in binary and 6 is 110 in binary so 11 | 101 = 111 (binary) = 7 (decimal).

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x |= 3 

means

x = x |3

bitwise or operation.

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It is bitwise

OR

and then assignment. This means the same as x = x | 3. about bitwise OR

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