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Based on some good advice gotten here on stackoverflow, I need some more guidance. I was told that Separation of Concerns is important for keeping code neat and modular and I am finding that it is.

My question is this: Based on what I have read about SOC, I have developed 2 classes. Suppliers class and Csv class. Suppliers merely retrieves data from the db regarding my different suppliers. The Csv class retrieves data from the csv file being imported, all of the info I need to parse it, with end goal of inserting the data into my Supplier tables. In order to accomplish my goal of inserting the csv data into the database, I need to use methods from both classes. Do I make a 3rd class called something like ImportSuppliersCsv or does it make more sense to create the import function as a method of the Suppliers class?

Shortened to save space, my classes are like so:

class Suppliers
{


    public $db;
    public $inv;
    public $table;


    public function __construct (PDO $db)
    {

        $this->db = $db;
        $this->inv = 'lightsnh_inventory';
        $this->table = 'suppliers';

    }


    public function getSuppliers() 
    {               

        $sql = 'SELECT * FROM `'.$this->inv.'`.`'.$this->table.'`';
        $statement = $this->db->query($sql);
        $result = $statement->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);

        return $result;

    }


    public function getActiveSuppliers() 
    {               

        $suppliers = $this->getSuppliers();     
        $active = array();      
        foreach($suppliers as $supplier) {

            if($supplier['exclude'] == 0)           
                    $active[] = $supplier;

        }

        return $active;

    }


    public function getDistributors() 
    {               

        $suppliers = $this->getSuppliers();     
        $distributors = array();        
        foreach($suppliers as $supplier) {

            if($supplier['type'] == 1)          
                    $distributors[] = $supplier;

        }

        return $distributors;

    }



    class Csv
    {


        public $form;


        public function __construct($form_name)
        {

            $this->form = $form_name;

        }


        public function getFile()
        {

            if(isset($_POST[$this->form.'-upload-submit'])) {

                return $_FILES[$this->form.'-file'];

            }

        }


        public function getName()
        {

            $file = $this->getFile();
            return $file['name'];

        }


        public function getExtension()
        {

            return end(explode('.',$this->getName()));

        }


        public function getType()
        {

            $file = $this->getFile();
            return $file['type'];

        }   etc.....
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2 Answers 2

You do not need a new class to insert new suppliers from CSV. You can simply add a new method and pass a Csv object to it. This way all supplier-related activity will be encapsulated in one class.

Or if you plan to have other sources of information, besides CSV, you can make suppliers method accept parsed information, not a CSV object.

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Neither. OOP/SoC/DI etc. are not an end, they're a means. The purpose of SoC is modular architecture making for easier maintenance, although separating concerns always enlarges the problem by obscuring it. I found the best way to come up with a good design in PHP is to first make it work, and then refactor. You can also do this in your imagination first to save some time. Organize it the way you see is best. After all, the idea is for whoever is going to maintain the code to be able to find their way easily, since they organized it that way. In short, beware of over-engineering.

In your example, I would not bother to make a class of something if it is only going to be used in one place. As an example: usually an application that can import CSV records into a database, also has a form to edit such rows, so I'll assume there is a 'save' function in the Suppliers class, given that it already abstracts queries (badly - no caching, no WHERE clause, SQL injection etc). The problem of importing a CSV file now is the problem of presenting the data in an orderly fashion to this 'save' function.

Now, the basic code itself to import a CSV file into a database is as simple as this:

$data = array_map( 'str_getcsv', explode("\n", file_get_contents( $filename ) ) );
$columns = array_shift( $data );
$sth = $db->prepareStatement( "INSERT INTO suppliers( " . implode( ',', $columns )
  . ") VALUES ( " . substr(str_repeat(",?",count($columns)),1) . ")"
);
foreach ( $data as $line )
  $sth->execute( $line );

Usually it is not that ideal - but this is in essence the core functionality. It is only 4 statements, four concerns: parsing the CSV, mapping the fields, updating the database, and efficiency/consistency (using a prepared statement).

OOP still relies on functional programming - to organize by functionality. The above can remain a script, to be called by a cron job or web page. It can be put in a function 'import_csv' to be re-used by these tasks. But to put it in a class is overkill. SoC also makes use of facades or interfaces. A function is exactly that, and is easily grouped into a class if need be. All you'd need is a function import_csv( $filename, $profile ). The $profile would indicate the table (or tables), the column mapping etc. By separating those out you can make a generic CSV to DB mapping editor - or at least support importing any CSV file into any table only by changing the configuration. If you make classes of everything you'll end up writing one class for every CSV file you're going to have to import. You can of course make a CSVImporter class, but this is only useful if there are also other Importer classes - after all, to make a class is to abstract the functionality, and you cannot abstract from only one example.

Imagine instead a generic importer, regardless of data. Focus on the functionality, as that is what code is. This is a far better approach, as your code will not depend on the database structure - you've already abstracted that (by extending a Table base class with a public interface so you can $table->save()). You'd not abstract the CSV (it is not worthwhile, as the first line of code shows), but the mapping.

This is not the answer you expected, but I'm sure you didn't want the answer to be the one you gave, since you posed it as a question.

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