Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After recently experimenting with MongoDB, I tried a few different methods of importing/inserting large amounts of data into collections. So far the most efficient method I've found is mongoimport. It works perfectly, but there is still overhead. Even after the import is complete, memory isn't made available unless I reboot my machine.

Example:

mongoimport -d flightdata -c trajectory_data --type csv --file trjdata.csv --headerline

where my headerline and data look like:

'FID','ACID','FLIGHT_INDEX','ORIG_INDEX','ORIG_TIME','CUR_LAT', ...
'20..','J5','79977,'79977','20110116:15:53:11','1967', ...

With 5.3 million rows by 20 columns, about 900MB, I end up like this:

Overhead

This won't work for me in the long run; I may not always be able to reboot, or will eventually run out of memory. What would be a more effective way of importing into MongoDB? I've read about periodic RAM flushing, how could I implement something like with the example above?

Update: I don't think my case would benefit much from adjusting fsync, syncdelay, or journaling. I'm just curious as to when that would be a good idea, and best practice, even if I was running on high RAM servers.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm guessing that memory is being used by mongodb itself, not mongoimport. Mongodb by design tries to keep all of its data into memory and relies on the OS to swap the memory-mapped files out when there's not enough room. So I'd give you two pieces of advice:

  1. Don't worry too much about what your OS is telling you about how much memory is "free" -- a modern well-running OS will generally use every bit of RAM available for something.

  2. If you can't abide by #1, don't run mongodb on your laptop.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess my case wouldn't benefit from adjusting fsync, syncdelay, or journaling. I'm just curious as to when that would be a good idea, and best practice, even if I was running on high RAM servers. –  Adam Barthelson Apr 6 '13 at 14:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.