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Or Can I use it in regular code?

If the answer is "no", then is there C++ library that will provide me with all the macros like CHECK_EQUAL, CHECK_CLOSE, etc.?

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3 Answers 3

It is only meaningful in unit tests, since its purpose is to alert the unit testing framework that a test failed, and then continue. If the unit testing framework isn't running, that won't work.

Outside unit tests, you'll usually want to use some flavor of assert instead.

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Thanks, for the answer, I updated my question. –  Łukasz Lew Oct 18 '09 at 11:59
    
What does it exactly mean that "unit testing framework is running". Does it mean that it is lined or that we are in BOOST_AUTO_TEST_CASE? What will happen if I call BOOST_CHECK_EQUAL outside of BOOST_AUTO_TEST_CASE? (with or without test framework linked?) –  Łukasz Lew Oct 18 '09 at 13:48

If the answer is "no", then is there C++ library that will provide me with all the macros like CHECK_EQUAL, CHECK_CLOSE, etc.?

The short answer is no. The longer answer: These macros are part of Boost.Test. So, if you are not using Boost.Test you will have to roll your own.

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I do use boost test. The first question is whether I cant use them outside unit test case. –  Łukasz Lew Oct 18 '09 at 13:45
    
Import the definitions (i.e. copy-paste the specific portion of the headers that define these macros in a separate header and add it to your project, you wouldn't want the whole of Boost.Test to be shipped with your code.) –  dirkgently Oct 18 '09 at 13:54

It's fairly easy to write this functionality based on boost/assert or cassert.
Note, however, that assertions may require some definitions (such as DEBUG)

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