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I've got class, that behaves lika a matrix, and all operations there like + , -, * etc work well.. But when I'm trying to get a single value, then I get weird values like 2.08252e-317 ... I've realized, that this bug happens only, when I want to create new metrix this way:

const Matrix b = a ;

without const it works well...

this is the declaration of my class:

class Matrix {
public:

Matrix(int x, int y);
~Matrix(void);
Matrix operator+(const Matrix &matrix) const;
Matrix operator-() const; 
Matrix operator-(const Matrix &matrix) const; 
Matrix operator*(const double x) const; 
Matrix operator*(const Matrix &matrix) const;

class Proxy {
    Matrix* _a;
    const Matrix* _constA;
    int _i;
public:

  Proxy(Matrix& a, int i) : _a(&a), _i(i) {
    }

    Proxy(const Matrix& constA, int i) : _constA(&constA), _i(i) {
    }

    double& operator[](int j) {
        return _a->_arrayofarrays[_i][j];
    }
};

Proxy operator[](int i) {
    return Proxy(*this, i);
}

Proxy operator[](int i) const {
    return Proxy(*this, i);
}



// copy constructor

Matrix(const Matrix& other) : _arrayofarrays() {
    _arrayofarrays = new double*[other.x ];
    for (int i = 0; i != other.x; i++)
        _arrayofarrays[i] = new double[other.y];

    for (int i = 0; i != other.x; i++)

        for (int j = 0; j != other.y; j++)
            _arrayofarrays[i][j] = other._arrayofarrays[i][j];

    x = other.x;
    y = other.y;
}
int x, y;
double** _arrayofarrays;
};

 //constructor

 Matrix::Matrix(int x, int y) {
_arrayofarrays = new double*[x];
for (int i = 0; i < x; ++i)
    _arrayofarrays[i] = new double[y];
this->x = x;
this->y = y;
}  

So I create some instance, fill it with values and then, when I want to print value on some index i get those weird values :-/

ie:

Matrix a(3,5);
//fill in the values to a
cout << a[1][1] << endl // prints out some nonsence

Does anybody have any idea, how to rewrite this class to be able to get proper values?

share|improve this question
    
Where is the conveniently omitted definition of Matrix(int x, int y) ? Furthermore, your operator dereferences _a when you clearly have (and potentially are using) the Proxy(const Matrix&, int i) construction of Proxy. Perhaps check which one is valid, which is not, and add both to all constructor initializer lists to ensure whichever is NOT valid is NULL. –  WhozCraig Apr 6 '13 at 3:18
    
@WhozCraig You mean the constructor? I'll edit it to my post.. –  Dworza Apr 6 '13 at 3:21
    
Great, then read the rest of that comment. –  WhozCraig Apr 6 '13 at 3:21
    
Also, this could easily be simplified as a contiguous matrix (i.e. you do not need a pointer-to-pointer solution). Simple pointer math and a single allocation of n*m elements will suffice, with each proxy being handed a row width and base address within the larger matrix where it resides. It is column isolation that is eventually going to bite you regardless of which method you use down this current road, but you're likely a ways off form discovering that. –  WhozCraig Apr 6 '13 at 3:24
    
Hmm now I've realized, thet it works well, when I'm using only Matrix a (int x, int y); creation of a new instance...nevertheless I must be also able to create it this way: const Matrix b=a; and then when I try to read from b, it fails... How is it possible, that it works for normal matrix and not for const ? –  Dworza Apr 6 '13 at 3:28
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