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I wish to write an print array function in c. I have herd when you pass an array to a c function via reference it passes a pointer to the first element. I am assuming that I can increment this pointer to iterate over the array however my program just segfaults.

I would like to know firstly why my program is seg faulting and also what the most idiomatic approach to writing a function like this in c. Thanks in adavnce.

void print_array(int *array, int length) {
    int i = 0; 
    for (i = 0; i < length; array++) {
        printf("%d\n", *array);
    }
}

int main (int argc, int *argv[]) {
    int test[10] = {0};
    print_array(test, 10);
}
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4  
you never increment i. –  luser droog Apr 6 '13 at 3:25
    
you are incrementing the pointer into oblivion –  Scott W Apr 6 '13 at 3:26
    
-1 for changing the value of a parameter. In less trivial code, it makes it hard to understand. –  Tom Blodget Apr 6 '13 at 3:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your loop is infinite, because i in i < length never changes; That condition always evaluates true. As a result, you're jumping past the end of the loop. I suggest changing your loop to:

for (i = 0; i < length; i++) {
    printf("%d\n", array[i]);
}

... or, if you wish to use array++, change the condition:

for (int *end = array + length; array < end; array++) {
    printf("%d\n", *array);
}
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Interesting. So *end is the array pointer + length. Am I correct in assuming that when you add an int to a pointer it returns a pointer offset by the added int. So given that array++ points to the next memory block? –  Stewart Apr 6 '13 at 4:07
1  
@Stewart s/points to the next memory block/causes array to point to the next int/. array + 1 points to array[1], and array++ is shorthand for array = array + 1. –  undefined behaviour Apr 6 '13 at 4:37

Try this:

void print_array(int *array, int length) {
    int i = 0; 
    for (i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        printf("%d\n", array[i]);
    }
}

Since i is your loop control variable (it's in the loop condition), you need to increment it to avoid an infinite loop. And using the [] notation is much easier to grasp for someone at your level than trying to increment the pointer manually.

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