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I want a function that returns a value from an ajax request. I want to stop javascript execution until the function get its value which is return by ajax asynchronous request. Something like:

function myFunction() {
    var data;
    $.ajax({
        url: 'url',
        data: 'data to send',
        success: function (resp) {
            data = resp;
        },
        error: function () {}
    }); // ajax asynchronus request 
    return data; // return data from the ajax request
}
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marked as duplicate by Barmar, Ian, Jan Dvorak, Vohuman, Eli Apr 6 '13 at 5:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
What does the first A in AJAX stand for? –  Barmar Apr 6 '13 at 5:17
    
@Barmar Aaardvark! –  Ian Apr 6 '13 at 5:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to register a callback function, something like this:

function test() {
    myFunction(function(d) {
        //processing the data
        console.log(d);
    });
}

function myFunction(callback) {
    var data;
    $.ajax({
        url: 'url',
        data: 'data to send',
        success: function (resp) {
            data = resp;
            callback(data);
        },
        error: function () {}
    }); // ajax asynchronus request 
    //the following line wouldn't work, since the function returns immediately
    //return data; // return data from the ajax request
}
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1  
No need to still store it in data. Just call the callback –  Ian Apr 6 '13 at 5:22
    
@Ian still better than the rest of the kin :-) –  Jan Dvorak Apr 6 '13 at 5:28
    
@JanDvorak Never said it wasn't :) Just trying to help improve the answer. –  Ian Apr 6 '13 at 5:31
$.ajax({
        url: 'url',
        data: 'data to send',
        async: false,
        success: function (resp) {
            data = resp;
        },
        error: function () {}
    }); // ajax synchronus request 
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you need to do asyn = False like :

$.ajax({
    async: false,
    // ...
    success: function(jsonData) {
    //Your Logic
    }
});
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That's in case you want an synchronous response, of course. –  Pere Jun 3 at 11:47

Ajax is asynchronous, that means that the ajax call is dispatched but your code keeps on running as happy as before without stopping. Ajax doesn't stop/pause execution until a response is received. You'll have to add an extra callback function or something like that.

    function myFunction() {
var data;
$.ajax({
    url: 'url',
    data: 'data to send',
    async: false,
    success: function (resp) {
        data = resp;
        callback.call(data);
    },
    error: function () {}
}); // ajax asynchronus request 
return data; // return data from the ajax request
  }
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You need to actually pass data or resp to the callback... –  Ian Apr 6 '13 at 5:21
    
yes rgt....tahnx @lan....for redirecting me.... :) –  thumber nirmal Apr 6 '13 at 5:24
1  
Well, you probably want callback.call(this, data); since call's first parameter is for setting the this context in the function. –  Ian Apr 6 '13 at 5:25

Use async: false for your ajax request since Ajax is asynchronous.

Setting async to false means that the statement you are calling has to complete before the next statement in your function can be called. If you set async: true then that statement will begin it's execution and the next statement will be called regardless of whether the async statement has completed yet.

From jQuery docs:

By default, all requests are sent asynchronously (i.e. this is set to true by default). If you need synchronous requests, set this option to false

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1  
You gotta give a better explanation than that. While that might work, the OP probably won't understand, since they don't understand the problem at hand. –  Ian Apr 6 '13 at 5:19

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