Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a large dataset that looks like this:

set.seed(1234)
id <- c(3,3,3,5,5,7)
amount <- c(24,48,60,84,96,175)
start <- as.Date(c("2006-01-01","2009-12-09","2010-01-01","2006-04-24", "2009-12-09","2009-05-01"))
end <- as.Date(c("2010-01-01","2010-01-01","2010-01-01","2009-12-09","2009-12-09", "2009-05-01"))               
noise <-rnorm(6)
test <- data.frame(id,amount,start,end,noise)            

  id amount      start        end      noise
   3     24 2006-01-01 2010-01-01  0.4978505
   3     48 2009-12-09 2010-01-01 -1.9666172
   3     60 2010-01-01 2010-01-01  0.7013559
   5     84 2006-04-24 2009-12-09 -0.4727914
   5     96 2009-12-09 2009-12-09 -1.0678237
   7    175 2009-05-01 2009-05-01 -0.2179749

But it needs to look like this:

  id amount      start        end      noise   switch
   3     24 2006-01-01 2009-12-09  0.4978505        0
   3     48 2009-12-09 2010-01-01 -1.9666172        1
   3     60 2010-01-01 2010-01-01  0.7013559        2
   5     84 2006-04-24 2009-12-09 -0.4727914        0 
   5     96 2009-12-09 2009-12-09 -1.0678237        1
   7    175 2009-05-01 2009-05-01 -0.2179749        0

That is, I would like to lag the values of start and replace the values of end with them, by ID. Second, I would like to create a new variable called 'switch' that counts how many times the 'amount' changes on the id with the first observation being == 0 for the initial condition. I have tried using ts() to make the lags, which does what I want in principle, though it produces a ts object rather than a Date:

       out <- cbind(as.ts(test$start),lag(test$start))
       colnames(out) <- c("start","end")
       cbind(as.ts(test$start),lag(test$start))

         as.ts(test$start) lag(test$start)
            NA           13149
          13149           14587
          14587           14610
          14610           13262
          13262           14587
          14587           14365
          14365              NA

So the lag(test$start) column is what my end should look like, but applied over the id variable. So I try to vectorize and apply it over the id variable:

        #make it a function 
        lagfun <- function(x){
          cbind(as.ts(x),lag(x))
        }

        y <- unlist(tapply(start,id,lagfun))     

And this is where things get really ugly. Is there a better way to go about this?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

if you put your time series in a data.table, you can accomplish this in a single line:

testDT[ , c("end", "switch") := 
          list( c(tail(start, -1), tail(end, 1)), cumsum(c(0, diff(amount) != 0)))
      , by=id]

Here it is broken down:

# create your data.table object 
library(data.table)
testDT <- data.table(test)


# Modify `end` by taking the lag of start and the final date from end. 
#   do this `by=id`
testDT[, end := c(tail(start, -1), tail(end, 1)), by=id]

# Count the ammount of times that each amount differs from the 
#  previous ammount value.  
# Start this vector at 0, and take the cummulative sum. 
#  also do this by id 
testDT[, switch := cumsum(c(0, diff(amount) != 0)), by=id]

# this is the final result. 
testDT
   id amount      start        end      noise switch
1:  3     24 2006-01-01 2009-12-09 -1.2070657      0
2:  3     48 2009-12-09 2010-01-01  0.2774292      1
3:  3     60 2010-01-01 2010-01-01  1.0844412      2
4:  5     84 2006-04-24 2009-12-09 -2.3456977      0
5:  5     96 2009-12-09 2009-12-09  0.4291247      1
6:  7    175 2009-05-01 2009-05-01  0.5060559      0
share|improve this answer
    
I should always start with data table. Thanks, you've made my day! –  kpeyton Apr 6 '13 at 6:09
    
Well I'm glad I was able to make your day with such a short investment of time :) data.table is mind bogglingly amazing, especially the by= which I find ends up saving countless minutes of coding time. –  Ricardo Saporta Apr 6 '13 at 6:11
1  
minutes? hours, days! There is a nice vignette for beginners like me here –  kpeyton Apr 6 '13 at 6:32
1  
The FAQ (linked-to in the vignette) is also very helpful as are the help pages themselves (very well written and detailed) –  Ricardo Saporta Apr 6 '13 at 6:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.