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I am a .NET programmer.

Are there any web based resources to pick up Clinical laboratory interface programming, using Serial Ports and ASTMH protocol ? Or any books ?

When i googled i found the ASTMH site which apparently publishes the standard. My specific problem is that i have developed a C# program to connect a Lab Info System (LIS) to a Software application called Remisol2000 ,which is an aggregator software for multiple Beckman Coulter lab systems. My interface program is not getting the ACK handshake acknowledgment from Remisol2000. I thought i could get some 'how to' or tutorial since this is my first LIS interface. I could check to see if i have made any mistake in my approach.

Thanks, Chak.

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When you googled for ASTMH, what did you find? Anything? Was there a question or a problem with the google results? What more did you need to know? –  S.Lott Oct 18 '09 at 12:22
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When i googled i found the ASTMH site which apparently publishes the standard. My specific problem is that i have developed a C# program to connect a Lab Info System (LIS) to a Software application called Remisol2000 ,which is an aggregator software for multiple Beckman Coulter lab systems. My interface program is not getting the ACK handshake acknowledgment from Remisol2000. I thought i could get some 'how to' or tutorial since this is my first LIS interface. I could check to see if i have made any mistake in my approach. –  Chakra Oct 18 '09 at 13:16
    
I am using ASTMH as well as LX20 protocols in the sample program which is sending the request for line. The problem is that though this 'client' LIS program works with a dummy 'server' program i have written to test , it does not work with the real Remisol2000 server program in the Clinical Lab. I thought a tutorial might help find any gaps if any. –  Chakra Oct 18 '09 at 13:24
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You should edit those comments into your question. It will probably help people who know about these things find your question and answer it. –  Thomas Owens Oct 21 '09 at 12:31
    
See my answer in your other thread on this topic. Definitive protocol documentation (such as ASTM stuff) can be purchased for a fee from clsi.org . –  Angelo Oct 27 '09 at 13:57

1 Answer 1

Perhaps it might be as simple as the serial port settings on your application? Serial comms require the baud rate, stop bits and parity settings to match on both sides of the link.

If they don't match then the sending application will send its information down the wire - with no acknowledgement from the receiver.

You may want to start by using a terminal program to communicate with your hardware directly. This will at least confirm that your serial port is configured correctly for the recieving equipment - and allow you to check the next layer up in the stack, which is your own program.

Note that older hardware might well be expecting ASCII control codes like ENQ and responding with codes like ACK. You'll need to use the corresponding char in C# for this - respectively, (char)5 and (char)6.

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Thanks. I ensured that they match. I have now been able to send the message to the Server application by correcting some configurations. However, now i find that the message 'ENQ' goes to the application as 'E' followed by 'N' , followed by 'Q' followed by <LF>. I need to figure this out. –  Chakra Dec 1 '09 at 9:07

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