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supposing I have a decimal like

0.30000000000000027

What would be the best algorithm to know the same number expressed as a fraction So given certain x find y that satisfies x=1/y in c or haskell

I was thinking

 1/3> 0.30 >1/4

Iterating left and right side til one of them converges and > becomes = so first iteration would look like

1/1  >  0.30000000000000027  > 1/somethinghere
1/2  >  0.30000000000000027  > 1/increase or decrease this 
1/3  >  0.30000000000000027 ...

I want to clarify that I could easily do

0.30000000000000027  =  30000000000000027/  10^17

but I want to do

0.30000000000000027 = 1/x

In c or haskell

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2  
Not all numbers can be thus expressed, for example, 0.8 = 4/5. –  Koterpillar Apr 6 '13 at 6:13
    
yes got it but if algorithm does not converge, then I have a number with this quality –  cMinor Apr 6 '13 at 6:15
2  
@Koterpillar No, that assumes he already has a fraction. He's trying to find the fraction in the first place. –  Barmar Apr 6 '13 at 6:20
1  
@Barmar, you can start with 30000000000000027/10^17. –  Koterpillar Apr 6 '13 at 6:21
1  
Imaginary numbers solve problems with roots, they have nothing to do with multiplication and division. –  Barmar Apr 6 '13 at 6:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have you looked into continued fractions? They give very good approximations of numbers.

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Voila (converts almost properly to a normal fraction):

int gcd(int a, int b)
{
    if (a == 0) return b;
    if (b == 0) return a;

    if (a > b)
        return gcd(b, a % b);
    else
        return gcd(a, b % a);
}

struct frac {
    int num;
    int denom;
};

struct frac to_frac(double x, int precision)
{
    int denom = 1;
    for (int i = 0; i < precision; i++) {
        denom *= 10;
    }

    int num = x * denom + 0.5; // hack: round if imprecise
    int gcdiv = gcd(num, denom);

    struct frac f;
    f.num = num / gcdiv;
    f.denom = denom / gcdiv;

    return f;
}
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1  
Sidenote: this is not production-ready, some refining is needed if you want it to work in all circumstances - that's left as an exercise, this much code should be enough to get OP started. –  user529758 Apr 6 '13 at 6:28
    
typedef the struct will be better to read i guess. –  Koushik Apr 6 '13 at 6:30
1  
He wants his numerator always to be 1. His statement about possibly using imaginary numbers shows how confused he is about math. –  Barmar Apr 6 '13 at 6:33
1  
@Barmar ... (but you can't express any fraction with a numerator of 1!) –  user529758 Apr 6 '13 at 6:34
1  
@Barmar Still, you're right, but what he wants is impossible, I'm not even sure that's exactly what he wants. This is the closest answer I can imagine that makes sense. –  user529758 Apr 6 '13 at 6:35

Don't know haskell, here it is in pseudo-code:

raw_denom = 1/x;
print "1/" floor(raw_denom) " >= " x " >= 1/" ceil(raw_denom)
share|improve this answer
    
1/1 >= 0.8 >= 1/2 IT all depends on the (ill defined) design requirements, but that meets some interpretation. In Haskell: func x = let raw_denom = 1/x in putStrLn $ "1/" ++ show (floor raw_denom) ++ " >= " ++ show x ++ " >= 1/" ++ show (ceiling raw_denom) –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Apr 6 '13 at 6:43
    
My answer prints what he wrote after "I was thinking" in his question. –  Barmar Apr 6 '13 at 6:45

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