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How to pass the 2d array to function I have created one and wanted to define function which initialize this array.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
int n = 5;**strong text**
void wypelnijTabliceBooli(bool** b){
      for(int i = 0; i < n; i++){
        for(int j = 0; j < n; j++)
            b[i][j] = 0;
    }
}
int main(){
    bool b[n][n];
    wypelnijTabliceBooli(b);
    return 0;
}

and i get

error: cannot convert 'bool (*)[(((unsigned int)(((int)n) + -0x000000001)) + 1)][(((unsigned int)(((int)n) + -0x000000001)) + 1)]' to 'bool**' for argument '1' to 'void wypelnijTabliceBooli(bool**)'|
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marked as duplicate by Zeta, chris, Bo Persson, Joce, Regexident Apr 10 '13 at 19:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Arrays are not pointers. –  chris Apr 6 '13 at 8:06
1  
bool[n][n] is not the same as bool**. Cannot help more unless you post real code. –  john Apr 6 '13 at 8:08
1  
@Aiias That's not legal code either. –  john Apr 6 '13 at 8:09
    
@john this is a real code –  Yoda Apr 6 '13 at 8:10
2  
@RobertKilar Unfortunately you have chosen to use non-standard C++. int n = 5; bool b[n][n]; is not legal C++ even before you try to pass the array to a function. –  john Apr 6 '13 at 8:12
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4 Answers

Arrays aren't pointers. Only the "first" (dominant) dimension of an array can decay into a pointer when passed to a function. Otherwise, if you have a multidimensional array, you have to declare it in the function argument list accordingly:

void funcTaking2DArray(int (*arr)[5])
{
    // do stuff
}

int array[10][5];
funcTaking2DArray(array);
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@WhozCraig Thanks, didn't know about this terminology. Anyways, that's "first", and not "last". –  user529758 Apr 6 '13 at 8:16
    
+1 nice answer =) yeah, its the dimension with all the gusto, as it is the magnitude order for all others that follow combined. –  WhozCraig Apr 6 '13 at 8:16
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Use dimensions:

void wypelnijTabliceBooli(bool b[n][n])

You could pass it as a pointer to array, but all but the "outermost" dimension needs to be known:

void wypelnijTabliceBooli(bool (* b)[n])

Edit: I accept that this, with everything else unmodified, requires the GNU or other compilers that have extensions above C++ standard. The alternative is to make n a const value.

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Actually, all outer dimensions need to be known, only the first one can be omitted. –  user529758 Apr 6 '13 at 8:14
    
I wonder if this is another gcc extension, or C99? –  john Apr 6 '13 at 8:16
    
@john, GCC has VLAs, yes, but not wit good compiler options turned on. –  chris Apr 6 '13 at 8:16
    
@chris no kidding? I thought that feature was never going to be in C++. Why would they put it in? How odd. –  WhozCraig Apr 6 '13 at 8:19
    
@WhozCraig, There's a proposal for it, actually. –  chris Apr 6 '13 at 8:21
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It seems like you want the size of the array to be flexible. You can declare b as:

bool** b = new bool*[n]
for (i=0; i<n; i++)
    b[i] = new bool[n]
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As long as I know when you use:

void wypelnijTabliceBooli(bool** b){
  for(int i = 0; i < n; i++){
    for(int j = 0; j < n; j++)
        b[i][j] = 0;
}
}

you can't use indexes do address the bool two dimensional array. This happens because bi-dimensional arrays are stored in contiguous memory places and if you don't provide at least one of the array dimensions there is no way of knowing when does knowing when a given "line ends". example: Imagine you have a bool array:

bool myArray[2][3]={{true,true,false},{false,false,true}};

In memory this will be like that (where [] represents a memory block):

[true][true][false][false][false][true]

and by passing only a pointer to it now you have no way of knowing if this was array[3][2] or array[2][3].

This is solved by passing to the function all but one dimension of the array, like this:

void wypelnijTabliceBool(bool b[][3] ){
  for(int i = 0; i < n; i++){
    for(int j = 0; j < n; j++)
        b[i][j] = 0;
}
}

(if your second dimension was 3).

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