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Is it possible to have a generic constructor that takes any type of initializer list, even if this has nested lists within?

Say you have the following partial template specialization for a class that takes in its constructor nested initializer lists:

template class ClassA;

template <>
class ClassA<4> {

  typedef std::initializer_list<double> list_type;
  typedef std::initializer_list<list_type> llist_type;
  typedef std::initializer_list<llist_type> lllist_type;
  typedef std::initializer_list<lllist_type> initializer_type;

  size_t n_[4] = {0};
  double* data_;

public:

  ClassA(initializer_type l) {

    assert(l.size() > 0);
    assert(l.begin()->size() > 0);
    assert(l.begin()->begin()->size() > 0);
    assert(l.begin()->begin()->begin()->size() > 0);

    size_t m = n_[0] = l.size();
    size_t n = n_[1] = l.begin()->size();
    size_t o = n_[2] = l.begin()->begin()->size();
    n_[3] = l.begin()->begin()->begin()->size();

    data_ = new double[m*n*o*n_[3]];

    int i=0, j=0, k=0, p=0;
    for (const auto& u : l) {
      assert(u.size() == n_[1]);
      for (const auto& v : u) {
        assert(v.size() == n_[2]);
        for (const auto& x : v) {
          assert(x.size() == n_[3]);
          for (const auto& y : x) {
            data_[i + m*j + m*n*k + m*n*o*p] = y;
            ++p;
          }
          p = 0;
          ++k;
        }
        k = 0;
        ++j;
      }
      j = 0;
      ++i;
    }
  }

  size_t size() const {
    size_t n = 1;
    for (size_t i=0; i<4; ++i)
      n *= n_[i];
    return n;
  }

  friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const ClassA& a) {
    for (int i=0; i<a.size(); ++i)
      os<<" "<<a.data_[i];
    return os<<endl;
  }

};


int main()
{

  ClassA<4> TT = { {{{1.}, {7.}, {13.}, {19}}, {{2}, {8}, {14}, {20}}, {{3}, {9}, {15}, {21}}}, {{{4.}, {10}, {16}, {22}}, {{5}, {11}, {17}, {23}}, {{6}, {12}, {18}, {24}}} };
  cout<<"TT -> "<<TT<<endl;

  return 0;
}

This code prints:

TT ->  1 4 2 5 3 6 7 10 8 11 9 12 13 16 14 17 15 18 19 22 20 23 21 24

Now, I'm trying to generalize the constructor so that I don't have to specialize the class template for each dimension. The problem is that when I replace the constructor with something like:

template <class L>
ClassA(std::initializer_list<L> l) {
  cout<<"generic list constructor"<<endl;
}

The clang compiler fails with error:

error: no matching constructor for initialization of 'ClassA<4>

Can someone point out why is this happening? The template matching is not working for initializer lists, probably because this is a new C++ feature? Thank you all...

EDIT

Thanks to the help of @JohannesSchaub-litb and @Daniel Frey, I was able to craft a very generic constructor that takes the initializer_list of any dimension. This is the resulting code:

template <int d, typename T>
class ClassA {

  size_t n_[d] = {0};
  T* data_;

  template <int D, typename U>
  struct Initializer_list {

    typedef std::initializer_list<typename Initializer_list<D-1,U>::list_type > list_type;

    Initializer_list(list_type l, ClassA& a, size_t s, size_t idx) {

      a.n_[d-D] = l.size();

      size_t j = 0;
      for (const auto& r : l)
        Initializer_list<D-1, U> pl(r, a, s*l.size(), idx + s*j++);
    }
  };

  template <typename U>
  struct Initializer_list<1,U> {

    typedef std::initializer_list<T> list_type;

    Initializer_list(list_type l, ClassA& a, size_t s, size_t i) {

      a.n_[d-1] = l.size();
      if (!a.data_)
        a.data_ = new T[s*l.size()];

      size_t j = 0;
      for (const auto& r : l)
        a.data_[i + s*j++] = r;
    }
  };

  typedef typename Initializer_list<d,T>::list_type initializer_type;

public:

  // initializer list constructor
  ClassA(initializer_type l) : data_(nullptr) {
    Initializer_list<d, T> r(l, *this, 1, 0);
  }

  size_t size() const {
    size_t n = 1;
    for (size_t i=0; i<4; ++i)
      n *= n_[i];
    return n;
  }

  friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const ClassA& a) {
    for (int i=0; i<a.size(); ++i)
      os<<" "<<a.data_[i];
    return os<<endl;
  }
};

int main()
{

  ClassA<4, double> TT = { {{{1.}, {7.}, {13.}, {19}}, {{2}, {8}, {14}, {20}}, {{3}, {9}, {15}, {21}}}, {{{4.}, {10}, {16}, {22}}, {{5}, {11}, {17}, {23}}, {{6}, {12}, {18}, {24}}} };
  cout<<"TT -> "<<TT<<endl;

  return 0;
}

Of course the code prints

TT ->  1 4 2 5 3 6 7 10 8 11 9 12 13 16 14 17 15 18 19 22 20 23 21 24

I love this template metaprogramming stuff! Thank you guys for helping figuring this out.

aa

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I believe what you really want to do is to automatically build the right type

template<int S, typename E>
class make_list_type {
public:
  typedef std::initializer_list<
    typename make_list_type<S-1, E>::type
  > type;
};

template<typename E>
class make_list_type<0, E> {
public:
  typedef E type;
};

template<int S>
class ClassA {
  typedef typename make_list_type<S, double>::type initializer_type;

public:
  ClassA(initializer_type l) 
};

As for why your try did not work, see Templates don't always guess initializer list types

share|improve this answer

In general, the answer is (AFAIK): No. But for your specific case, you might use the knowledge that it all ends with double as the leafs:

class arg_type
{
private:
    bool is_value;
    double d;
    std::vector<arg_type> subs;
public:
    arg_type(double v) : is_value(true), d(v) {}
    arg_type(std::initializer_list<arg_type> l) : is_value(false), subs(l) {}
};

and change your ctor to:

typedef std::initializer_list<arg_type> initializer_type;

ClassA(initializer_type l) {
  // ...
}

Hope it helps...


Update: As pointed out by Mankarse (thanks!), the above has undefined behaviour. Here's a version that should fix it without using Boost:

#include <vector>
#include <memory>
#include <iostream>
#include <initializer_list>

class arg_type
{
private:
    std::shared_ptr<void> subs; // empty => d is valid
    double d;

public:
    arg_type(double v) : d(v) {}
    arg_type(std::initializer_list<arg_type> l);

    void print() const;
};

arg_type::arg_type(std::initializer_list<arg_type> l)
  : subs(std::make_shared<std::vector<arg_type>>(l))
{}

void arg_type::print() const
{
   if( subs ) {
     std::cout << "( ";
     for( const auto& e : *std::static_pointer_cast<std::vector<arg_type>>(subs) ) {
       e.print();
     }
     std::cout << ") ";
   }
   else {
      std::cout << d << " ";
   }
}

struct MyClass
{
   MyClass( std::initializer_list<arg_type> l) {
      for( const auto& e : l ){
         e.print();
      }
   }
};

int main()
{
   MyClass m { 1, 2, { 3, 4, { 6, 7, { 8 }}}, 5 };
}

If you want to play with it, here's the live example.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, this code has undefined behaviour because it instantiates std::vector with an incomplete type (arg_type). Replace std::vector with boost::container::vector, and all will be well. –  Mankarse Apr 6 '13 at 9:54
    
@Mankarse: Thanks! I updated the answer with a Boost-free alternative. –  Daniel Frey Apr 6 '13 at 10:26
    
I'm having a hard time trying to understand why you're using a vector. It seems that the only way your code works is by creating a vector from the nested lists. But isn't the nested list a data structure that one can use? –  Alejandro Marcos Aragon Apr 6 '13 at 10:42
    
@AlejandroMarcosAragon Copying a std::initializer_list does not copy the underlying objects. The underlying array is not guaranteed to exist after the lifetime of the original initializer list object has ended. (From here). It might be possible to only store/use the initializer list temporarily, but it seems safer and more general to copy stuff into a vector. –  Daniel Frey Apr 6 '13 at 10:52
    
I believe he really wanted to do the thing I described below in my answer. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 6 '13 at 14:41

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