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In my code, I have an array of 10 fraction objects, and for testing purposes I simply wanted to edit the first fraction in that array. My .h file is as follows:

/*frac_heap.h*/

/*typedefs*/

typedef struct
{
   signed char sign;
   unsigned int denominator;
   unsigned int numerator;
}fraction;

typedef struct
{
    unsigned int isFree;
}block;

void dump_heap();
void init_Heap();
fraction* new_frac(); 

In my .c file is the following:

// File frac_heap.c
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "frac_heap.h"

#define ARRAYSIZE 10

fraction* heap[ARRAYSIZE] = {};
block* freeBlocks[ARRAYSIZE] = {};
int startingBlock = 0;

void init_Heap(){
    int x;
    for(x = 0; x < ARRAYSIZE; x ++){    
        block *currBlock = &freeBlocks[x];
        currBlock->isFree = 1;  
    }

}
void dump_heap(){
    int x;
    for(x = 0; x < ARRAYSIZE; x ++){
        fraction* tempFrac = &heap[x];
        printf("%d\t%d\t%d\n",tempFrac->sign, tempFrac->numerator, tempFrac->denominator);
    }   

}

fraction* new_frac(){
    fraction* testFraction = &heap[0];
    return testFraction;
}  

int main(){

    init_Heap();

    fraction *p1;
    p1 = new_frac();
    p1->sign = -1;
    p1->numerator  = 2;
    p1->denominator = 3;
    dump_heap();
    return 0;
   }

The output of dump_heap() should list the 10 fractions (their sign, numerator, and denominator), with fraction 1 being the only one that is changed. However, the output is the following:

-1  2   3
3   0   2
2   0   0
0   0   0
0   0   0
0   0   0
0   0   0
0   0   0
0   0   0
0   0   0

How are fractions 2 and 3 being edited when I only have a pointer to fraction 1 as p1? Am i using pointers wrong?

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3  
You have to allocate the memory for your pointers somewhere. –  Étienne Apr 6 '13 at 11:07
2  
freeBlocks[] is an array of block* so this block * currBlock = &freeblock[x] should be without the &. this goes with heap to. –  Koushik Apr 6 '13 at 11:11
    
Changing fraction* heap[arraysize] to = {null}; and then removing the & before heap[0] as well as freeBlocks[x] results is segmentation faults. –  user2252004 Apr 6 '13 at 11:20
    
segmentation fault is because none of the elements of the arrays, both freeBlocks[] and heap[] have been suitably initialized nor defined –  Koushik Apr 6 '13 at 11:44
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3 Answers

Either you need to malloc() your structures or define fixed size arrays of fraction (if the size is fixed.

Alternative #1:

fraction heap[ARRAYSIZE][10] = {};

Alternative #2:

fraction* heap[ARRAYSIZE] = {};

void init_Heap(){
int x;
for(x = 0; x < ARRAYSIZE; x ++){    
    block *currBlock = &freeBlocks[x];
    currBlock->isFree = 1;  

    /*MALLOC FRACTIONS*/
    heap[x] = (fraction*)malloc(  sizeof(fraction));
    heap[x]->numerator=0;
    heap[x]->denominator=0;
    heap[x]->sign=0;
    }
}

void dump_heap(){
    ...
    fraction* tempFrac = heap[x]; /*You cannot de-reference heap*/
    ...
}

fraction* new_frac(){
    ...
    fraction* testFraction = heap[0];
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
fraction heap[ARRAYSIZE][10] = {}; if ARRAYSIZE is defined as 50, wouldnt those two clash since it would be heap[50][10]? –  user2252004 Apr 10 '13 at 6:07
    
Fractions 2-4 are showing denominators of 1 right after calling init_heap. If I comment out init_heap they are all correct even after adding a fraction to the list. Any reason why the block *currBlock pointer could influence items in heap? –  user2252004 Apr 10 '13 at 6:14
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You have two errors...

The first is that you use the address-of operator & when you get the pointers from the array. When you use it on a pointer you get a pointer to a pointer, not the actual pointer.

The second problem is that you don't allocate the pointers.

So when you try to dererference the structure pointers not only will access wrong memory pointer, if you remove the & operator then you would access unallocated memory. Both of these will cause undefined behavior. The second of which will most likely give you a crash.


You also can't initialize an array with just empty braces. You have to put what you want to initialize the array to inside the braces:

fraction* heap[ARRAYSIZE] = { NULL };
share|improve this answer
    
Changing fraction* heap[arraysize] to = {null}; and then removing the & before heap[0] as well as freeBlocks[x] results is segmentation faults. Where exactly do you allocate the pointers? –  user2252004 Apr 6 '13 at 11:19
    
@user2252004 That's because of the second error you make, not allocating memory for the structures. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 6 '13 at 11:20
    
Do you mean, for example, instead of having fraction* testFraction = heap[0]; I should instead have fraction* testFraction; alone on its own line before assigning it to heap[0]? –  user2252004 Apr 6 '13 at 11:24
1  
I was afraid you would mention that. On this particular problem, malloc is unavailable as it is practice with generating our own memory block structures. –  user2252004 Apr 6 '13 at 11:27
1  
@user2252004 Then the arrays should be arrays of structures and not arrays of pointers to structures. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 6 '13 at 11:28
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change

fraction* heap[ARRAYSIZE] = {};
block* freeBlocks[ARRAYSIZE] = {};

to

fraction heap[ARRAYSIZE] = {0};
block freeBlocks[ARRAYSIZE] = {0};

type* name[SIZE] : make pointer array

you want ten fraction object. fraction arrayName[10];

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