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I'm trying to implement the vector like and the map like [] operator for a class. But I get error messages from my compilers (g++ and clang++). Found out that they only occurs if the class has also conversion operators to integer types.

Now I have two problems. The first is that I don't know why the compiler can't distinguish between [](const std::string&) and when the class has conversion operators to ints. The second... I need the conversion and the index operator. Does anyone know how to fix that?

thanks in advance and best regards from me

works:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <string>

struct Foo
{
    Foo& operator[](const std::string &foo) {}
    Foo& operator[](size_t index) {}
};

int main()
{
    Foo f;
    f["foo"];
    f[2];
}

does not work:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <string>

struct Foo
{
    operator uint32_t() {}
    Foo& operator[](const std::string &foo) {}
    Foo& operator[](size_t index) {}
};

int main()
{
    Foo f;
    f["foo"];
    f[2];
}

compiler error:

main.cpp: In function 'int main()':
main.cpp:14:9: error: ambiguous overload for 'operator[]' in 'f["foo"]'
main.cpp:14:9: note: candidates are:
main.cpp:14:9: note: operator[](long int, const char*) <built-in>
main.cpp:7:7: note: Foo& Foo::operator[](const string&)
main.cpp:8:7: note: Foo& Foo::operator[](size_t) <near match>
main.cpp:8:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from 'const char [4]' to 'size_t {aka long unsigned int}'
share|improve this question
    
There is no such thing as a "cast operator". The operator in question is a conversion. A cast is something you write in your source code to tell the compiler to do a conversion. –  Pete Becker Apr 6 '13 at 18:46
    
Thank you @Pete Becker for pointing that out. –  r2p2 Apr 6 '13 at 18:57
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The problem is that your class has a conversion operator to uint32_t, so the compiler does not know whether to:

  1. Construct a std::string from the string literal and invoke your overload accepting an std::string;
  2. Convert your Foo object into an uint32_t and use it as an index into the string literal.

While option 2 may sound confusing, consider that the following expression is legal in C++:

1["foo"];

This is because of how the built-in subscript operator is defined. Per Paragraph 8.3.4/6 of the C++11 Standard:

Except where it has been declared for a class (13.5.5), the subscript operator [] is interpreted in such a way that E1[E2] is identical to *((E1)+(E2)). Because of the conversion rules that apply to +, if E1 is an array and E2 an integer, then E1[E2] refers to the E2-th member of E1. Therefore, despite its asymmetric appearance, subscripting is a commutative operation.

Therefore, the above expression 1["foo"] is equivalent to "foo"[1], which evaluates to o. To resolve the ambiguity, you can either make the conversion operator explicit (in C++11):

struct Foo
{
    explicit operator uint32_t() { /* ... */ }
//  ^^^^^^^^
};

Or you can leave that conversion operator as it is, and construct the std::string object explicitly:

    f[std::string("foo")];
//    ^^^^^^^^^^^^     ^

Alternatively, you can add a further overload of the subscript operator that accepts a const char*, which would be a better match than any of the above (since it requires no user-defined conversion):

struct Foo
{
    operator uint32_t() { /* ... */ }
    Foo& operator[](const std::string &foo) { /* ... */ }
    Foo& operator[](size_t index) { /* ... */ }
    Foo& operator[](const char* foo) { /* ... */ }
    //              ^^^^^^^^^^^
};

Also notice, that your functions have a non-void return type, but currently miss a return statement. This injects Undefined Behavior in your program.

share|improve this answer
    
Now my brain hurts. But I think I understand it now. Wanted to make it as easy as possible for the user. The explicit cast to int or std::string don't help with that. Makes me a bit sad. Thank you for explaining and the solutions. –  r2p2 Apr 6 '13 at 12:49
    
@r2p2: I understand what you mean, but an explicit cast to uint_32 is not that bad. After all, it would prevent such things as Foo f; if (f) { /* ... */ }; or Foo f; std::cout << (f + f); from compiling. –  Andy Prowl Apr 6 '13 at 12:52
    
@r2p2: Also notice, that in my last update I suggest a further alternative (using an additional overload that accepts a const char*). –  Andy Prowl Apr 6 '13 at 12:53
    
I like the const char* solution. This just seems to struggle with [0]. Which would be fine I think. The project will become some kind of variant data storage. Which would take care of type errors internally. Wanted to make is as transparent as possible for the user. PS: In the real project there are no empty braces. :) –  r2p2 Apr 6 '13 at 13:04
    
@r2p2: OK :) Good luck with your project! –  Andy Prowl Apr 6 '13 at 13:06
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The problem is that f["foo"] can be resolved as:

  1. Convert "foo" to std::string (be it s) and do f[s] calling Foo::operator[](const std::string&).
  2. Convert f to integer calling Foo::operator int() (be it i) and do i["foo"] using the well known fact that built-in [] operator is commutative.

Both have one custom type conversion, hence the ambiguity.

The easy solution is to add yet another overload:

Foo& operator[](const char *foo) {}

Now, calling f["foo"] will call the new overload without needing any custom type conversion, so the ambiguity is broken.

NOTE: The conversion from type char[4] (type type of "foo") into char* is considered trivial and doesn't count.

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As noted in other answers, your problem is that [] commutes by default -- a[b] is the same as b[a] for char const*, and with your class being convertible to uint32_t this is as good a match as the char* being converted to std::string.

What I'm providing here is a way to make an "extremely attractive overload" for when you are having exactly this kind of problem, where an overload doesn't get called despite your belief that it should.

So here is a Foo with an "extremely attractive overload" for std::string:

struct Foo
{
  operator uint32_t() {return 1;}
  Foo& lookup_by_string(const std::string &foo) { return *this; }
  Foo& operator[](size_t index) {return *this;}
  template<
    typename String,
    typename=typename std::enable_if<
      std::is_convertible< String, std::string >::value
    >::type
  > Foo& operator[]( String&& str ) {
    return lookup_by_string( std::forward<String>(str) );
  }
};

where we create a free standing "lookup by string" function, then write a template that captures any type that can be converted into a std::string.

Because it "hides" the user-defined conversion within the body of the template operator[], when checking for matching no user defined conversion occurs, so this is preferred to other operations that require user defined conversions (like uint32_t[char*]). In effect, this is a "more attractive" overload than any overload that doesn't match the arguments exactly.

This can lead to problems, if you have another overload that takes a const Bar&, and Bar has a conversion to std::string, the above overload may surprise you and capture the passed in Bar -- both rvalues and non-const variables match the above [] signature better than [const Bar&]!

share|improve this answer
    
I really have to read that Template Metaprogramming book. –  r2p2 Apr 6 '13 at 14:18
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