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i declared a stl map like this

          map< map< set< int > ,int >, int> mymap[2]

and i declared iterators like this

         set < int > ::iterator it3;
         map< map< set< int > ,int >, int> :: iterator it1;
         map< set< int > ,int > :: iterator it2;

and i wrote some what like this

       for(it1=mymap[0].begin();it1!=mymap[0].end();it1++)
    {
            for(it2=(it1->first).begin();it2!=(it1->first).end();it2++)
            {
                  for(it3=(it2->first).begin();it3!=(it2->first).end();it3++)
                  {
                    cout<<*it3<<" "<<it1->second<<endl;
                  }
            }           
    }
}

i am getting some weird error can any body help me

share|improve this question
    
I've found this question non-constructve – duDE Apr 6 '13 at 12:51
1  
I don't feel inclined to look into this too deeply (wonder why). Just change iterator to const_iterator see if that helps. – john Apr 6 '13 at 12:53
    
What's the error? – OGH Apr 6 '13 at 12:59
    
now its segementation fault – Rajesh Nadal Apr 6 '13 at 13:03
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a bunch of problems in your code. The most trivial: you're missing a semicolon after the declaration of your map; also, you have an extra brace at the end.

Finally, the keys of a map are const values, and when calling begin() on a const container, what you get is a const_iterator, not an iterator. Here is how you should fix your program:

#include <map>
#include <set>
#include <iostream>

using std::map;
using std::set;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

int main()
{
    map< map< set< int > ,int >, int> mymap[2];
    //                                        ^ MISSING SEMICOLON HERE

    map< map< set< int > ,int >, int> :: iterator it1;

    map< set< int > ,int > ::const_iterator it2;
    //                       ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ <== MAP KEYS ARE CONST VALUES!
    set < int > ::const_iterator it3;
    //            ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ <== MAP KEYS ARE CONST VALUES!

    for(it1=mymap[0].begin();it1!=mymap[0].end();it1++)
    {
        for(it2=(it1->first).begin();it2!=(it1->first).end();it2++)
        {
              for(it3=(it2->first).begin();it3!=(it2->first).end();it3++)
              {
                std::cout<<*it3<<" "<<it1->second<<endl;
              }
        }
    }
    // } <== EXTRA BRACE HERE
}

Also notice, that in C++11 you can simplify things by using auto, which would have saved your from this kind of troubles:

int main()
{
    map< map< set< int > ,int >, int> mymap[2];
    for (auto it1 = mymap[0].begin(); it1 != mymap[0].end(); it1++)
    //   ^^^^
    {
        for (auto it2 = (it1->first).begin(); it2 != (it1->first).end(); it2++)
        //   ^^^^
        {
              for (auto it3=(it2->first).begin(); it3!=(it2->first).end(); it3++)
              //   ^^^^
              {
                  std::cout<<*it3<<" "<<it1->second<<endl;
              }
        }
    }
}

Range-based for loops make this even simpler:

int main()
{
    map< map< set< int >, int >, int> mymap[2];
    for (auto const& m : mymap[0])
    {
        for (auto const& s : m.first)
        {
            for (auto const& e : s.first)
            {
                std::cout << e << " " << m.second << endl;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
sorry sir semicolons wantedly i did not keep in the question – Rajesh Nadal Apr 6 '13 at 13:17
    
@rafanadal: No problem, that happens – Andy Prowl Apr 6 '13 at 13:17
    
rest of all u told is correct sir – Rajesh Nadal Apr 6 '13 at 13:17

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