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Consider the following piece of code:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

int main() {
    int i = 23;
    int j = 1;
    int base = 10;
    int k = 2;
    i += j * pow(base, k);
    std::cout << i << std::endl;
}

It outputs "122" instead of "123". Is it a bug in g++ 4.7.2 (MinGW, Windows XP)?

Update:

I've done some more research based on your comments. Consider the following:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

int main() {
    double d = std::pow(10, 2);
    int i = std::pow(10, 2);
    std::cout << d << std::endl;
    std::cout << i << std::endl;
}

It outputs:

100
99

Looks like the problem is with cast from double to int.

share|improve this question
9  
I feel like this is a good time for the old What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic reference. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Apr 6 '13 at 13:50
1  
I was doing exercise §6.6[16] from Bjarne Stroustrup's book on C++ that says to write a function that converts string representation of integers to integer. I gave the function input 123 and it returned 122 so I started to investigate the issue. –  user1257 Apr 6 '13 at 14:26
2  
Your example would work with a correctly rounded pow() floating-point function. You can find one here: lipforge.ens-lyon.fr/www/crlibm . However, your approach would still show its limits with computations involving larger integers, which may not be represented exactly as floating-point numbers (and then there is nothing even a correctly rounded pow() function can do). –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 6 '13 at 14:36
1  
@sellibitze: Qualifying pow with std:: gives 122 as well. –  user1257 Apr 6 '13 at 14:50
6  
@DanielKamilKozar This article is not relevant to the question, since it only discusses the function PositivePower(x,n) (function which would make the OP's example work if it were used). The article does not discuss the general pow(), nor why it should be wrong by more than 1ULP. You have a good heuristic with “Cite Goldberg every-time something strange happens with floating-point”, but it is only a heuristic. –  Pascal Cuoq Apr 6 '13 at 20:07

5 Answers 5

std::pow() works with floating point numbers, which do not have infinite precision, and probably the implementation of the Standard Library you are using implements pow() in a (poor) way that makes this lack of infinite precision become relevant.

However, you could easily define your own version that works with integers. In C++11, you can even make it constexpr (so that the result could be computed at compile-time when possible):

constexpr int int_pow(int b, int e)
{
    return (e == 0) ? 1 : b * int_pow(b, e - 1);
}

Here is a live example.


Tail-recursive form (credits to Dan Nissenbaum):

constexpr int int_pow(int b, int e, int res = 1)
{
    return (e == 0) ? res : int_pow(b, e - 1, b * res);
}
share|improve this answer
5  
But normally, you would expect floating point arithmetic to work just fine when both the inputs and output are (smallish) integers. (1.0 + 1.0 == 2.0, with no rounding errors, for example). So I can't blame the OP for being puzzled at rounding errors being introduced in this particular case (that is, pow(10.0, 2.0) != 100.0) –  jalf Apr 6 '13 at 13:54
3  
-1 just for bringing up the naive int_pow implementation. Learn the basics here. –  Stéphane Gimenez Apr 6 '13 at 14:55
5  
This answer fails to identify the core problem. It states “std::pow() works with floating point numbers, which do not have infinite precision,” but lack of precision is not the reason that pow returns the wrong result. There is more than enough precision in the parameters and the return type of pow to return an exact result. The actual problem is a poor quality pow implementation. A good pow implementation will return exactly 1024 for pow(10., 2.). Blaming floating-point arithmetic for this is like blaming integer arithmetic if 45 % 7 returned 2. –  Eric Postpischil Apr 6 '13 at 20:55
4  
@DanNissenbaum: Per IEEE Standard for Floating-Point Arithmetic (754-2008), clause 3.3, floating-point formats represent (-1)**s•be•m, where s is 0 or 1, e is an integer in an interval depending on the format, and m is a number represented by a certain digit string depending on the format (equivalent to an integer in a certain range divided by a certain power of the base), plus +infinity, -infinity, quiet NaN, and signaling NaN. **Nothing in the standard says floating-point objects represent intervals. That is incorrect common lore passed by rumor, not specification. –  Eric Postpischil Apr 6 '13 at 22:57
4  
@DanNissenbaum: Why are you still spouting this confusion? I told you before and you refuse to listen; the implementation doesn't care what you intend. It's not in the mind-reading business. It sees 123.0 and knows that it would be insane to round 123.0 to 122. Like I said before, floating-point numbers are not necessarily approximations and they don't represent ranges of real numbers. Each one represents a single real number. Modern FPUs don't make errors. Please, please, please learn how floating-point works. –  tmyklebu Apr 7 '13 at 2:55

Not with mine at least:

$ g++ --version | head -1
g++ (GCC) 4.7.2 20120921 (Red Hat 4.7.2-2)

$ ./a.out 
123

IDEone is also running version 4.7.2 and gives 123.


Signatures of pow() from http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cmath/pow/

     double pow (      double base,      double exponent );
long double pow ( long double base, long double exponent );
      float pow (       float base,       float exponent );
     double pow (      double base,         int exponent );
long double pow ( long double base,         int exponent );

You should set double base = 10.0; and double i = 23.0.

share|improve this answer
2  
Floating point to integer is fickle. –  jotep Apr 6 '13 at 13:45
5  
-1 How does this even answer the question? –  0x499602D2 Apr 6 '13 at 13:49
6  
All you've shown is that there exists at least one version of GCC which behaves as the OP expected. That doesn't answer the question of whether the OP's version has a bug, or the behavior is permissible under the standard –  jalf Apr 6 '13 at 13:50
1  
@jalf Actually he's shown that it works in the same version as the OP (to the extent that the OP specified the version number). –  JBentley Apr 6 '13 at 14:06
1  
@JBentley he shows that it works with the same GCC version on a potential different CPU, OS, Standard library or GCC-build. what does that prove? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 6 '13 at 14:27

All the other answers so far miss or dance around the one and only problem in the question:

The pow in your C++ implementation is poor quality. It returns an inaccurate answer when there is no need to.

Get a better C++ implementation, or at least replace the math functions in it. The one pointed to by Pascal Cuoq is good.

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1  
So, you think that relying on the QoI is perfectly fine? I would not accept his code in a review because of the rounding issues. –  sellibitze Apr 6 '13 at 22:14
2  
@sellibitze: I wrote nothing about relying on the quality of implementation. Engineering consists of, among other things, deriving results from specifications. If you have a trusted specification that your library returns exact results when they are representable, then you may rely on it. If you do not have such a specification, then you may not rely on it. –  Eric Postpischil Apr 6 '13 at 23:06
    
Sure, you're suggesting to replace the pow implementation instead of fixing the code. –  sellibitze Apr 7 '13 at 11:31
    
Are you saying that the ISO C++ standard requires implementations of pow to return the precise result if it is expressible? If so: Can you point me to that guarantee? –  sellibitze Apr 7 '13 at 12:15
    
...as off-topic as suggesting to get another C++ library implementation... –  sellibitze Apr 7 '13 at 16:36

If you simply write

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

int main() {
    int i = 23;
    int j = 1;
    int base = 10;
    int k = 2;
    i += j * pow(base, k);
    std::cout << i << std::endl;
}

what do you think is pow supposed to refer to? The C++ standard does not even guarantee that after including cmath you'll have a pow function at global scope.

Keep in mind that all the overloads are at least in the std namespace. There is are pow functions that take an integer exponent and there are pow functions that take floating point exponents. It is quite possible that your C++ implementation only declares the C pow function at global scope. This function takes a floating point exponent. The thing is that this function is likely to have a couple of approximation and rounding errors. For example, one possible way of implementing that function is:

double pow(double base, double power)
{
    return exp(log(base)*power);
}

It's quite possible that pow(10.0,2.0) yields something like 99.99999999992543453265 due to rounding and approximation errors. Combined with the fact that floating point to integer conversion yields the number before the decimal point this explains your result of 122 because 99+3=122.

Try using an overload of pow which takes an integer exponent and/or do some proper rounding from float to int. The overload taking an integer exponent might give you the exact result for 10 to the 2nd power.

Edit:

As you pointed out, trying to use the std::pow(double,int) overload also seems to yield a value slightly less 100. I took the time to check the ISO standards and the libstdc++ implementation to see that starting with C++11 the overloads taking integer exponents have been dropped as a result of resolving defect report 550. Enabling C++0x/C++11 support actually removes the overloads in the libstdc++ implementation which could explain why you did not see any improvement.

Anyhow, it is probably a bad idea to rely on the accuracy of such a function especially if a conversion to integer is involved. A slight error towards zero will obviously make a big difference if you expect a floating point value that is an integer (like 100) and then convert it to an int-type value. So my suggestion would be write your own pow function that takes all integers or take special care with respect to the double->int conversion using your own round function so that a slight error torwards zero does not change the result.

share|improve this answer
1  
Pretty sure the standard allows that cmath functions be defined in the global namespace. Yes, that sucks. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 6 '13 at 14:01
    
@KonradRudolph: I see no contradiction. The standard certainly does not require implementations to declare the C++ math functions at global scope. Having just a single pow function taking doubles from the C library available in this scope is one possible implementation effect. –  sellibitze Apr 6 '13 at 14:03
1  
Good pow implementations are not implemented with exp(log(base)*power), and they are implemented well enough that pow(10., 2.) returns exactly 100. The problem here is not function resolution or floating-point arithmetic; it is solely quality-of-implementation. –  Eric Postpischil Apr 6 '13 at 21:04
1  
@EricPostpischil: "The problem is not function resolution" -- Well, it seems the "problem" is there because of a couple of reasons together. I personally would not expect a pow(double,double) function to be as accurate as possible. But I expect pow(double,int) to be implemented in a way that pow(10.0,2) exactly yields 100. Obviously, if pow(double,int) was implemented in that way and function resolution picked this function, the OP should have gotten 100 as result. But it seems that his std::pow(double,int) overload is not able to yield exactly 100.0. –  sellibitze Apr 6 '13 at 22:07
1  
@EricPostpischil: Seems to be in C++98, along with std::pow(float, int) and std::pow(long double, int). See lib.c.math. –  tmyklebu Apr 7 '13 at 1:20

Your problem is not a bug in gcc, that's absolutely certain. It may be a bug in the implementation of pow, but I think your problem is really simply the fact that you are using pow which gives an imprecise floating point result (because it is implemented as something like exp(power * log(base)); and log(base) is never going to be absolutely accurate [unless base is a power of e].

share|improve this answer
1  
"unless base is a power of e" ... but you can't even represent e^n accurately as a floating point number, so I don't think "unless" is appropriate here, right? (EDIT: thinking about it, that doesn't invalidate your statement, it's just that it is simply impossible to have a base that is a power of e) –  catchmeifyoutry Apr 6 '13 at 19:23
4  
The result from pow in this question is not imprecise; it is inaccurate. The precision in in the return type is more than enough to return the exact value. –  Eric Postpischil Apr 6 '13 at 21:04
    
I have edited so that is says "accurate" rather than "precise". –  Mats Petersson Apr 11 '13 at 21:42

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