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I've been working a server side ajax class that is used to return a json string. This class, for example, could return the json data whenever an ajax request is performed on the server. Now, I am wondering when it is appropriate to return http status codes based on the response from the server.

So, for example, lets say the user is submitting a registration form and the request is made via ajax. If the server detects malformed or bad syntax (I.E. bad email or name or validation failed), would it be appropriate to allow the server in this case to set an http status code error (400) inside the header as part of the response using the ajax object?

To take this a step further, we could use jquery .ajax error to process the error message.

From my development experience, I've often noticed validation errors or other errors like a conflict are returned from the server as a 200 and usually the error is determined in the success function of jquery.ajax. This doesn't seem like good http practice to me? What do you think?

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1 Answer 1

You can set response code. For example in php -

<?php
http_response_code(404);
?>
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Yeah, that is a pretty handy network function of php5.4 that I have played with as well but it doesn't answer my question. I do understand how to return http status codes inside the header using both java and php :-p. I just want to know if I should try to do it as much as possible, even with ajax requests made to the server for something like input validation (i.e. registration) –  DrayC Apr 6 '13 at 15:05
    
I would suggest not to use status codes for input validation.Their are better way's then that..when You can respond with your own custom codes in json format –  Mohammad Adil Apr 6 '13 at 15:10
    
But doesn't this defeat the purpose of the fact that I am using http for this scenario and http already has well defined definitions on status codes? It seems like a custom solution is only reinventing the wheel and it will make it more challenging for the next person to pick up. –  DrayC Apr 6 '13 at 15:31

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