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Reading from here, this C++11 code seems weird to me:

template <typename Builder>
auto
makeAndProcessObject (const Builder& builder) -> decltype( builder.makeObject() )
{
    auto val = builder.makeObject();
    // do stuff with val
    return val;
}

I have several questions:

1) Does the decltype(builder.makeObject()) calls one additional time the makeObject function before the actual call is performed?

2) If not and everything is known at compile time (so it's kind of an enhanced-macro), why isn't the following syntax valid and I need the new return value syntax?

//WRONG    
template <typename Builder>
    decltype( builder.makeObject() )
    makeAndProcessObject (const Builder& builder)
    {
        auto val = builder.makeObject();
        // do stuff with val
        return val;
    }

[bonus question - awards a +1 on the answer] 3) In this question a guy asked why his code didn't compile and the answer was a missing "const" specifier to a member function makeObject. I got the answer but not why the const is required.

What gives to the following declaration

template <typename Builder>
auto
makeAndProcessObject (const Builder& builder) -> decltype( builder.makeObject() )

if a const Builder& object reference has a const makeObject or non-const makeObject? The decltype(builder.makeObject()) part must only find out what the return type of the function is, it shouldn't care if the function modifies or not the object passed as parameter!

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4  
One question per question please. Stop trying to counteract SO's mechanics ("bonus question - awards a +1 on the answer" wtf) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 6 '13 at 16:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. No. decltype creates an unevaluated context just like sizeof. The compiler looks at type information and nothing else.

  2. You can't use a parameter in a leading return type.

    decltype( builder.makeObject() ) makeAndProcessObject (const Builder& builder)
    

causes an error because builder is an unknown identifier. That's the reason trailing return types were created.

  • In unevaluated context, type information is important. And whether the this parameter is const or not is part of the type information. If decltype didn't do overload resolution it would be quite useless. This might not make sense if you've never seen overloading based on const-ness of the member function, but it is possible to have two functions with the same name and arguments, one which is called for const views on the object and one for non-const. And the return types can be different (actually, they often are different by a const).
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+1 added, thank you!! –  Johnny Pauling Apr 6 '13 at 16:15

In general, things in C++ are not available until after they are declared. In your example, you are trying to use builder before it has been declared:

template <typename Builder>
    decltype( builder.makeObject() ) // using builder here
    makeAndProcessObject (const Builder& builder) // but builder isn't declared until here
    {
        auto val = builder.makeObject();
        // do stuff with val
        return val;
    }

The new syntax for function return types was added to get around this problem.

template <typename Builder>
auto // dummy return type, meaning we will give it later
makeAndProcessObject (const Builder& builder)  // declaring builder here
-> decltype( builder.makeObject() ) // using builder here -- no problem.
{
    auto val = builder.makeObject();
    // do stuff with val
    return val;
}

As for your bonus question: it is just much simpler for the language to say that you have to give decltype a valid expression, instead of having another set of rules about what parameters are valid for decltype.

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+1 for you too, thanks!! –  Johnny Pauling Apr 6 '13 at 16:15

The answers:

1) No. decltype only computes the type of the expression at compile time and it doesn't evaluate the expression at runtime. For this reason, decltype is said to be an "unevaluated context" as it is sizeof and noexcept.

2) Notice that in this declaration

template <typename Builder>
decltype( builder.makeObject() )
makeAndProcessObject (const Builder& builder)

The compiler sees builder before it sees its declaration const Builder& builder whereas with the accepted declaration, at the moment of determining the return type, the compiler has already parsed all the information it needs. The auto keyword tells the compiler to hold on that the return type will be given later when more information is available.

3) The issue is not with the declaration

template <typename Builder>
auto
makeAndProcessObject (const Builder& builder) -> decltype( builder.makeObject() )

It's actually with the function body. More precisely, the following line:

auto val = builder.makeObject();

Since builder is a const Builder& only const methods can be called on builder and, originally, makeObject() wasn't one of them. Then making this method const fixed the problem.

Update: After having read Ben Voigt's answer. Contrarily to what I said above, the issue is also present in the declaration because it uses decltype(builder.makeObject()) and the same arguments that I used to the body of the function also applies here.

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Another +1 for a well-written answer! –  Johnny Pauling Apr 6 '13 at 16:16

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