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Is it possible to match on a comparison using the pattern matching system in Scala? For example:

a match {
    case 10 => println("ten")
    case _ > 10 => println("greater than ten")
    case _ => println("less than ten")
}

The second case statement is illegal, but I would like to be able to specify "when a is greater than".

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This can also be used to check if a function evaluates to true, e.g. case x if x.size > 2 => ... –  tstenner Sep 7 '10 at 14:53
1  
The important thing to understand is that the "patterns" to the left of => operator are indeed "patterns". The 10 in the first case expression you have is NOT the integer literal. So, you can't perform operations (like > check or say function application isOdd(_)) on the left. –  Ustaman Sangat May 1 '13 at 21:22
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3 Answers

up vote 100 down vote accepted

You can add a guard, i.e. an if and a boolean expression after the pattern:

a match {
    case 10 => println("ten")
    case x if x > 10 => println("greater than ten")
    case _ => println("less than ten")
}

Edit: Note that this is more than superficially different to putting an if after the =>, because a pattern won't match if the guard is not true.

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2  
Ben, good answer, it really illustrates the importance of pattern guard. –  JeffV Oct 19 '09 at 9:44
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As a non-answer to the question's spirit, which asked how to incorporate predicates into a match clause, in this case the predicate can be factored out before the match:

def assess(n: Int) {
  println(
    n compare 10 match {
      case 0 => "ten"
      case 1 => "greater than ten"
      case -1 => "less than ten"
    })
}

Now, the documentation for RichInt.compare(Int) promises only that the non-equal outcomes will be greater than or less than zero. Java's Comparable#compareTo(T) is specified similarly to Scala's. It happens to be conventional to use 1 and -1 for the positive and negative values, respectively, as Scala's current implementation does, but one can't make such an assumption without some risk of the implementation changing out from underneath.

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I'm not sure if you're suggesting this as a real solution, but I would strongly recommend against anything that relies on an undocumented convention or assumption. –  Ben James Feb 12 '10 at 13:12
1  
Exactly. That's why I wrote "one can't make such an assumption without some risk", and qualified my answer as a "non-answer". It's interesting to consider why compare() and compareTo() don't specify 0, 1, and -1 as their codomain. –  seh Feb 12 '10 at 15:53
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Use guards:

a match {
    case 10 => println("ten")
    case some if some > 10 => println("greater than ten")
    case _ => println("less than ten")
}
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