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Here is my code:

function render(){
    var el;
    setTimeout(function(){
      func();
    },1000);
    return el;
  }

function func(){
    //do something here;
}

setTimeout is async, so el will be returned before execute func.I want to return el after calling func, how should I write the callback function?

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Do you want the caller of render to wait until el is available (as you said el is returned from the function)? If so I'm not sure the @CD answer would work for you. –  Paul Grime Apr 6 '13 at 17:55
2  
You can't. You'll need to rewrite your logic so the things that should depend on the return value of func are actually triggered at the end of func –  Gareth Apr 6 '13 at 17:56
    
@Gareth, got it. But not sure how to make it work. Any more details about how to do that? Thx –  Yujun Wu Apr 6 '13 at 18:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

use a callback - a function that el will be passed to:

function render(callback){
    var el;
    setTimeout(function(){
      func();
      callback(el);
    },1000);
  }

function func(){
    //do something here;
}

function elReady(el){
    // use `el`
}

So now you can use render(elReady).

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how should the callback function be? Simply function callback(el){return el;} won't work since I want render to return el. Could you elaborate a little bit? –  Yujun Wu Apr 6 '13 at 17:59
    
the callback should contain what ever you'd like to do with el, it will be called once el is 'ready'. –  CD.. Apr 6 '13 at 18:00
    
well my concern is the same as @PaulGrime commented above –  Yujun Wu Apr 6 '13 at 18:03
4  
@YujunWu: If you want a 1000ms delay, then you simply can not return the value you want from render. There's no such thing as a synchronous pause in JavaScript (at least not without blocking). You need to change your code to fit the environment, because the environment sure isn't going to change to fit your code. –  squint Apr 6 '13 at 18:08
    
+1 but it might help OP to see the callback actually being passed to render. This can be confusing at first. –  squint Apr 6 '13 at 18:13

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