Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can't figure out why this wont run. I am supposed to storehours * payrate in the wages array and then showResults take this info and cout it. The error i get when i run it is

error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "void __cdecl showResults(int * const,int,double * const,double * const,double * const)" (?showResults@@YAXQAHHQAN11@Z) referenced in function
error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "void __cdecl getEmployeeData(int * const,int,double * const,double * const,double * const)" (?getEmployeeData@@YAXQAHHQAN11@Z) referenced in function `_main`

Code below:

#include <iomanip>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void getEmployeeData(int[], int, double[], double[], double[]);
void showResults(int[], int, double[], double[], double[]);


int main()
{
const int ARRAY_SIZE = 7;
int empId[ARRAY_SIZE] = {565, 845, 452, 130, 789, 758, 877};

double hoursWorked[ARRAY_SIZE]; // Holds hours worked
double payrate[ARRAY_SIZE]; // Holds pay rate
double wages[ARRAY_SIZE]; // Holds wages

getEmployeeData(empId, ARRAY_SIZE, payrate, hoursWorked, wages);

showResults(empId, ARRAY_SIZE, payrate, hoursWorked, wages);

system("pause");
    return 0;
}

void getEmployeedata(int nums[],int size,double pay[],double hours[],
double wages[])
{

//Hours worked and Pay rate
for(int index = 0; index < size; index++)
{
    cout << "Enter number of hours worked by employee number "
         << nums[index] << ": ";
    cin >> hours[index]; 
    cout << "\nEnter hourly pay rate ";
    cin >> pay[index];
    wages[index] = hours[index] * pay[index]; 
}
}

void showResults(int nums[], int size, double pay, double hours, double wages[])
{
for(int index = 0; index < size; index++)
{
    cout << "Employee Number Gross Wage " << endl
         << nums[index] << " " << wages[index];

}

}
share|improve this question
    
The C++ Standard Library provides a rich set of container types. These can easily be passed in and out of functions. You should use these instead of old-school arrays. –  moooeeeep Apr 6 '13 at 18:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want to pass arrays to functions, also try writing functions as

void getEmployeeData(int*, int, double*, double*, double*);
void showResults(int*, int, double*, double*, double*);

because when you pass array, you are passing pointer to the 0th index of that array. Also, as told, there is a typo in your code, replace getEmployeedata with getEmployeeData

Here is the corrected code :

#include <iomanip>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void getEmployeeData(int*, int, double*, double*, double*);
void showResults(int*, int, double*, double*, double*);


int main()
{
const int ARRAY_SIZE = 7;
int empId[7] = {565, 845, 452, 130, 789, 758, 877};

double hoursWorked[ARRAY_SIZE]; // Holds hours worked
double payrate[ARRAY_SIZE]; // Holds pay rate
double wages[ARRAY_SIZE]; // Holds wages

getEmployeeData(empId, ARRAY_SIZE, payrate, hoursWorked, wages);

showResults(empId, ARRAY_SIZE, payrate, hoursWorked, wages);

system("pause");
    return 0;
}

void getEmployeeData(int nums[],int size,double pay[],double hours[],double wages[])
{

//Hours worked and Pay rate
for(int index = 0; index < size; index++)
{
    cout << "Enter number of hours worked by employee number "
         << nums[index] << ": ";
    cin >> hours[index];
    cout << "\nEnter hourly pay rate ";
    cin >> pay[index];
    wages[index] = hours[index] * pay[index];
}
}

void showResults(int *nums, int size, double *pay, double *hours, double *wages)
{
for(int index = 0; index < size; index++)
{
    cout << "Employee Number Gross Wage " << endl
         << nums[index] << " " << wages[index];

}

}
share|improve this answer
    
What's the difference between a pointer and the way that i had it? In my book the only way i see it is like []. –  user1807815 Apr 6 '13 at 18:35
    
There is no difference apart from syntax, see this –  tigerden Apr 7 '13 at 18:16

The declaration and definition of showResults disagree about argument types. In particular, the pay and hours arguments are double[] in the declaration but only double in the definition.

void showResults(int[], int, double[], double[], double[]) // Declaration
//                                 ↕↕        ↕↕
void showResults(int[], int, double  , double  , double[]) // Definition

It appears that the declaration is correct and the definition is not, since you are passing arrays to them.

Your declaration and definitions of getEmployeeData disagree about the name.

void getEmployeeData(int[], int, double[], double[], double[]) // Declaration
/               ↕
void getEmployeedata(int[], int, double[], double[], double[]) // Definition

You probably want getEmployeeData to be consistent with the rest of your naming.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! i must've been overlooking that –  user1807815 Apr 6 '13 at 18:24
    
Better yet, double *. Having array-types parameters is a convenient lie, they get turned into pointers. (OTOH reference to array is a distinct type) –  Ben Voigt Apr 6 '13 at 18:24
    
@Ben Voigt So instead of double[], it should be double*? Why is that? –  user1807815 Apr 6 '13 at 18:33
    
@user1807815: Because the language says the actual parameter type is double*, even if you write double[]. (Implication: If you use sizeof inside the function, you get the size of a pointer) –  Ben Voigt Apr 6 '13 at 18:44

Your function names have typo:

getEmployeeData(empId, ARRAY_SIZE, payrate, hoursWorked, wages);

However, in definition youhave:

getEmployeedata(...);

also mismatch here:

 void showResults(int nums[], int size, double pay, double hours, double wages[])
                                            //^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.