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Works:

int GlobalVar = 5;
int * LPVar[] = {&GlobalVar};

Doesn't work:

int GlobalVar = 5;
int * LPVar[]; // int * LPVar[1] doesn't work too

LPVar[0] = &GlobalVar; // errors here

------ Build started: Project: pointers, Configuration: Release Win32 ------ Compiling... ilovpointers.cpp .\ilovpointers.cpp(9) : error C2466: cannot allocate an array of constant size 0 .\ilovpointers.cpp(9) : error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int .\ilovpointers.cpp(9) : error C2040: 'LPVar' : 'int []' differs in levels of indirection from 'int *[1]' .\ilovpointers.cpp(9) : error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'int *' to 'int []' There are no conversions to array types, although there are conversions to references or pointers to arrays Build log was saved at "file://f:\Visual Studio C++\Project1\pointers\pointers\Release\BuildLog.htm" pointers - 4 error(s), 0 warning(s) ========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

EDIT:

I solved but got question.

#include <iostream>
#include <stdio.h>

using namespace std;

int GlobalVar = 5;
int * LPVar[1];


void main()
{
    LPVar[0] = &GlobalVar;
    printf("%i", *LPVar[0]);

    cin.get();
}

LPVar is a global array so why it didn't work when I have put it just after definition?

share|improve this question
2  
int * LPVar[1] should work. What's the problem with it? – Pubby Apr 6 '13 at 19:34
1  
Are you sure int * LPVar[1]; doesn't work? Show us the error then. – john Apr 6 '13 at 19:35
    
What is the question? – Andy Prowl Apr 6 '13 at 19:35
3  
Is the code at file scope? If so, you can't have random assignments like LPVar[0] = &GlobalVar; written at file scope. You can only have declarations or definitions at file scope. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 6 '13 at 19:36
1  
main should have a return type of int. – 0x499602D2 Apr 6 '13 at 19:46
up vote 2 down vote accepted
  • Is the code at file scope?

    The answer appears to be yes given the updated code fragment.

  • If so, you can't have random assignments like LPVar[0] = &GlobalVar; written at file scope. You can only have declarations (without initializers) or definitions (optionally with initializers) at file scope.

In your question, this works (as indeed it should), because there are two variable definitions with initializers.

int GlobalVar = 5;
int *LPVar[] = {&GlobalVar};

This code does not work (as indeed it shouldn't), because the third line is an assignment statement and not a declaration or definition:

int GlobalVar = 5;
int *LPVar[];          // Declaration, not definition
LPVar[0] = &GlobalVar; // Assignment is not allowed outside a function body

Variant:

int GlobalVar = 5;
int *LPVar[1];         // Definition without initializer
LPVar[0] = &GlobalVar; // Assignment is not allowed outside a function body
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! – deepspace Apr 6 '13 at 19:49

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