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So, I'm trying to parse a Cucumber file (*.feature), in order to identify how many lines each Scenario has.

Example of file:


    Scenario: Add two numbers 
       Given I have entered 50 into the calculator
       And I have entered 70 into the calculator
       When I press add
       Then the result should be 120 on the screen

    Scenario: Add many numbers
       Given I have entered 50 into the calculator
       And I have entered 20 into the calculator
       And I have entered 20 into the calculator
       And I have entered 30 into the calculator
       When I press add
       Then the result should be 120 on the screen

So, I'm expecting to parse this file and get results like:

Scenario: Add two numbers ---> it has 4 lines!

Scenario: Add many numbers ---> it has 6 lines!

What's the best approach to do that?

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go line by line and if containing "Scenario:" then count until you get to next scenario or reach end? :) –  FeRtoll Apr 6 '13 at 20:53
    
Yeah, I was trying something like that... but the code looks like terrible: –  user2253130 Apr 6 '13 at 21:27
    
any code example? –  user2253130 Apr 6 '13 at 21:38
    
Should comment or line that not starts from "Given/When/Then/And/But" be counted? Should it count lines that start from other i18n Cucumber keywords? –  Andrey Botalov Apr 6 '13 at 22:12
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Enumerable#slice_before is pretty much tailor-made for this.

File.open('your cuke scenario') do |f|
  f.slice_before(/^\s*Scenario:/) do |scenario|
    title = scenario.shift.chomp
    ct = scenario.map(&:strip).reject(&:empty?).size
    puts "#{title} --> has #{ct} lines"
  end
end
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Why don't you start simple? Like @FeRtoll suggested, going line by line might be the easiest solution. Something as simple as the following might be what you are looking for :

scenario  = nil
scenarios = Hash.new{ |h,k| h[k] = 0 }

File.open("file_or_argv[0]_or_whatever.features").each do |line|
  next if line.strip.empty?

  if line[/^Scenario/]
    scenario = line
  else
    scenarios[scenario] += 1
  end
end

p scenarios

Output :

{"Scenario: Add two numbers \n"=>4, "Scenario: Add many numbers\n"=>6}
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Kyle Burton's solution was great.

However, I have to handle other non-scenario blocks like "Feature", and it's been a headache. So the approach I'm taking is: If scenario[:name] == "" then scenarios.delete(scenario)

Now, my problem is that when deleting the scenario, then it's messing up my array of hashes. It's not printing the :quantity_of_steps how I'm expecting:

{:scenario_name=>"\tScenario: Add two numbers", :scenario_line=>22, :feature_file=>"addition.feature", :quantity_of_steps=>4}

It's printing all steps inside :quantity_of_steps

{:scenario_name=>"\tScenario: Add two numbers", :scenario_line=>5, :feature_file=>"addition.feature", :quantity_of_steps=>["\t\tGiven I have entered 50 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tAnd I have entered 70 into the calculator", "\t\tWhen I press add", "\t\tThen the result should be 120 on the screen"]}

Any ideas?

Appreciate it a lot! Thanks!

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This is the current piece of code I'm working on (based on Kyle Burton approach):

def get_scenarios_info
    @scenarios_info = [:scenario_name => "", :quantity_of_steps => []]
    @all_files.each do |file|
        line_counter = 0
        File.open(file).each_line do |line|
            line.chomp!
            next if line.empty?
            line_counter = line_counter + 1
            if line.include? "Scenario:"
                @scenarios_info << {:scenario_name => line, :scenario_line => line_counter, :feature_file => file, :quantity_of_steps => []}
                next
            end
            @scenarios_info.last[:quantity_of_steps] << line
        end
    end
    #TODO: fix me here!
    @scenarios_info.each do |scenario|
        if scenario[:scenario_name] == ""
            @scenarios_info.delete(scenario)
        end
        scenario[:quantity_of_steps] = scenario[:quantity_of_steps].size
    end
    puts @scenarios_info
end
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FeRtoll suggested a good approach: accumulating by section. The simplest way to parse it for me was to scrub out parts that I can ignore (i.e. comments) and then split into sections:

file = ARGV[0] or raise "Please supply a file name to parse"

def preprocess file
  data = File.read(file)
  data.gsub! /#.+$/, ''    # strip (ignore) comments
  data.gsub! /@.+$/, ''    # strip (ignore) tags
  data.gsub! /[ \t]+$/, '' # trim trailing whitespace
  data.gsub! /^[ \t]+/, '' # trim leading whitespace
  data.split /\n\n+/       # multiple blanks separate sections
end

sections = {
  :scenarios    => [],
  :background   => nil,
  :feature      => nil,
  :examples     => nil
}

parts = preprocess file

parts.each do |part|
  first_line, *lines = part.split /\n/

  if first_line.include? "Scenario:"
    sections[:scenarios] << {
      :name  => first_line.strip,
      :lines => lines
    }
  end

  if first_line.include? "Feature:"
    sections[:feature] = {
      :name  => first_line.strip,
      :lines => lines
    }
  end

  if first_line.include? "Background:"
    sections[:background] = {
      :name  => first_line.strip,
      :lines => lines
    }
  end
  if first_line.include? "Examples:"
    sections[:examples] = {
      :name  => first_line.strip,
      :lines => lines
    }
  end
end

if sections[:feature]
  puts "Feature has #{sections[:feature][:lines].size} lines."
end

if sections[:background]
  puts "Background has #{sections[:background][:lines].size} steps."
end

puts "There are #{sections[:scenarios].size} scenarios:"
sections[:scenarios].each do |scenario|
  puts "  #{scenario[:name]} has #{scenario[:lines].size} steps"
end

if sections[:examples]
  puts "Examples has #{sections[:examples][:lines].size} lines."
end

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
Kyle Burton's solution was great. However, I have to handle other non-scenario blocks like "Feature", and it's been a headache. So the approach I'm taking is: If scenario[:name] == "" then scenarios.delete(scenario) Now, my problem is that when deleting the scenario, then it's messing up my array of hashes. It's not printing the :quantity_of_steps how I'm expecting (this is nice): {:scenario_name=>"\tScenario: Add two numbers", :scenario_line=>22, :feature_file=>"addition.feature", :quantity_of_steps=>4} It's printing all steps inside :quantity_of_steps :( –  user2253130 Apr 8 '13 at 0:23
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