Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am doing a program for my class, and I need to set all the values of the array 'decade' into -1 before I begin. I tried this (And the version in a for loop) and it just puts me in an infinite loop! Can someone explain why this is happening, and how I can fix it?

Code:

int decade[9][9], i = 0, k = 0;
while (i<10) {
    while (k<10) {
        printf("i is %d, k is %d\n",i,k);
        decade[i][k] = -1;
        k++;
    }
    k=0;
    i++;
}

Thanks in advanced!

It prints out this: What it prints out

For anyone who needs the answer in the future, declare decade as 'decade[10][10]' instead of 'decade[9][9]', or however yours is defined.

share|improve this question
6  
initial value for i and k? –  gongzhitaao Apr 6 '13 at 20:51
2  
What does it print out? –  Explosion Pills Apr 6 '13 at 20:51
    
Sorry, didn't include the part where i and k are both declared as '0', putting it in... –  Beaurocks16 Apr 6 '13 at 20:52
5  
decade[10][10] –  gongzhitaao Apr 6 '13 at 20:54
1  
0 -> 9 is 10 items so [9][9] isn't enough room –  Keith Nicholas Apr 6 '13 at 20:56

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When you declare an array of size 9 it has the indexes from 0 to 8. You go to 9 which will overwrite the memory. This is undefined behavior and can cause any number of subtle but faulty behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
This I think is the problem, let me try extending the size to 10... –  Beaurocks16 Apr 6 '13 at 21:00
Index out of bound exception for your code. Try this one instead.

   int dimSize = 10;
    int decade[dimSize][dimSize], i = 0, k = 0;
    while (i<dimSize) {
        while (k<dimSize) {
            printf("i is %d, k is %d\n",i,k);
            decade[i][k] = -1;
            k++;
        }
        k=0;
        i++;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Not the quickest, but both defines the problem and gives an example. –  Beaurocks16 Apr 6 '13 at 21:04
    
A programmer can easily understand what CODE I typed :) –  yunas Apr 6 '13 at 21:06
    
I know, thanks for the example –  Beaurocks16 Apr 6 '13 at 21:10

The dimension in "9x9" - you are initialzing 10x10. Set it to decade[10][10], use (x<8) or do (x<=9)

share|improve this answer
    
That fixed it, thanks –  Beaurocks16 Apr 6 '13 at 21:00

You loops must be from 0 to 8 (decade array is length 9):

while (i<9) {
    while (k<9) {
       /* ... */
    }
}
share|improve this answer
int decade[9][9], i = 0, k = 0;
while (i<10) {
    while (k<10) {
        printf("i is %d, k is %d\n",i,k);
        decade[i][k] = -1;
        k++;
    }
    k=0;
    i++;
}

is incorrect, because you are iterationg from 0 to 9 (10 elements)

this code is correct:

int decade[9][9], i = 0, k = 0;
while (i<9) {
   k = 0;

   while (k<9) {
      printf("i is %d, k is %d\n",i,k);
      decade[i][k] = -1;
      k++;
   }

i++;
}

note that you set k to zero before looping again.

There exists also other possibilities to loop for example the for loop, you use while loops actually not for counting.

share|improve this answer

I don't know how "decade" is defined - but if it is defined incorrectly, and/or the wrong size you could get a buffer overrun which could result in the wrong memory getting set to "-1" - i.e. the "i" or "k" variables could be getting overwritten.

share|improve this answer
4  
It sounds like you're describing a buffer overflow and not a memory leak. –  Pubby Apr 6 '13 at 20:53
    
A buffer overflow is a type of memory leak - but it isn't necessarily an "overflow". It could be wrong in one dimension, it could have the wrong number of dimensions, it could be of the wrong type, etc. –  Brad Apr 6 '13 at 20:56
1  
@Brad No, a memory leak is something completely different. –  user529758 Apr 6 '13 at 20:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.