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I'm trying to get the offset of the match found using re.search().

http://docs.python.org/dev/howto/regex.html

This site explains how to get offsets of match components relative to the start of the match, but doesn't say how to get the offset of the match itself in the "haystack" string.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted
>>> import re
>>> s = 'Hello, this is a string'
>>> m = re.search(',\s[a-z]',s)
>>> m.group()
', t'
>>> m.start()
5

More info can be found here.

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Does this behave differently if I am using a compiled regex rather than re.search? – Douglas Treadwell Apr 6 '13 at 23:04
    
It shouldn't, but there's only one way to find out for sure... – BrtH Apr 6 '13 at 23:06
    
Nevermind, my stupidity. I thought I was misunderstanding how to use regex but it turns out my regex was matching something different than I was expecting. Thanks for your answer. – Douglas Treadwell Apr 6 '13 at 23:08
    
Ok, glad you got it sorted out. – BrtH Apr 6 '13 at 23:18

You need to do something like this:

import re

for m in re.compile("[a-z]").finditer('what1is2'):
    print m.start(), m.group()
share|improve this answer
    
I tried using match.start() but it defaults to group 0, which is the whole match, and the relative offset of the whole match to the whole match is 0. – Douglas Treadwell Apr 6 '13 at 23:03
    
Nevermind, my stupidity. I thought I was misunderstanding how to use regex but it turns out my regex was matching something different than I was expecting. Thanks for your answer. – Douglas Treadwell Apr 6 '13 at 23:06

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