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Is there a way to find out the Scheme used at the run time ?

May be there is a better way to do this, I'm trying to set the Access Environment (Production vs Development) by using the Scheme name.

Currently I use #define ENV @"PROD" in App-Prefix.pch file to do this, but there is a chance to miss this when sending pkg to apple for review :(

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When running an app on the simulator or on your device, the DEBUG variable is set, allowing you to use it from your code:

#ifdef DEBUG
    // Something
#else
    // Something else
#endif

You can see this variable from your target's build settings:

As soon as the Run configuration is set on Debug (Product -> Scheme -> Edit Scheme), this variable will be set:

enter image description here

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ah, I didn't know that, thx for super fast response :) –  user390687 Apr 7 '13 at 0:09
    
Yeah, doing this using the Build Configuration is likely better than inferring it via the Scheme, since build configuration also affects lots of other build settings. –  Stuart M Apr 7 '13 at 0:09

I searched far and wide for an answer to this because I really don't like the idea of creating extra Targets nor extra Configuration sets. Both of those options just create a huge Configuration synchronization problem.

So, after hacking Xcode for a couple of hours, this is what I came up with:

Step 1: Add the key "SchemeName" to your Info.plist with type string.

Step 2: Edit your default scheme and on Build -> Pre-actions add a new Run Script with the following:

/usr/libexec/PlistBuddy -c "Set :SchemeName \"$SCHEME_NAME\"" "$PROJECT_DIR/$INFOPLIST_FILE"

Make sure and select a target from under "Provide build settings from".

Step 3: Now duplicate that scheme as many times as you like (Manage Schemes... -> Select existing scheme -> Click gear icon -> Duplicate) For instance, you can create Development, Staging, Production, App Store, etc. Don't forget to click "shared" if you want these schemes carried around in version control.

Step 4: In the code, you can retrieve the value like this:

NSString *schemeName = [[[NSBundle mainBundle] infoDictionary] valueForKey:@"SchemeName"];

Now, the code can configure itself correctly at runtime. No nasty preprocessor macros to deal with and no brittle configuration mess to maintain.

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