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I have two model classes - Parent and Child which are only linked via typed navigational properties.

public class Parent {
    [Key]
    [Required]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string ParentName { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Child> Children { get; set; }
}

public class Child {
    [Key]
    [Required]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string ChildName { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public virtual Parent Parent { get; set; }
}

Now I want to create a new Child for a parent using ASP.Net MVC. First, I need to show a view to the user. I need to somehow pass the parent object key to the view. I also want to show the ParentName. I just fetch the Parent object from the database, create a new Child object, set its Parent property to the fetched parent object.

    public ActionResult Create(int parentId) {
        var parent = db.Parents.Find(parentId);
        if (parent == null) {
            return HttpNotFound();
        }
        var child = new Child() { Parent = parent};
        return View(child);
    }

After the user fills the form, the data is sent to the Create action using HTTP POST.

    [HttpPost]
    [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
    public ActionResult Create(Child child)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            //db.Parents.Attach(child.Parent); //Added later
            db.Children.Add(child);
            db.SaveChanges();
            return RedirectToAction("Index", new { parentId = child.Parent.Id });
        }
    }

Here I've hit my first problem. The child.Parent was not null and child.Parent.Id was correct, but EF trashed it and created a new empty parent (with a different key) in the database and linked the child to it. I've fixed this problem by attaching the child.Parent to the data context before adding the child (db.Parents.Attach(child.Parent)).

But then I was hit with another problem. At first, my model classes were wrong and didn't have the [Required] attributes thus creating nullable database table columns. I've added the attribute and the code stopped working. The code doesn't work because ModelState.IsValid is false which happens because child.Parent.Name of the passed child is null.

How can the problem of adding the child to the parent be solved? I'm interested in solution which:

  • Uses EF Code-First and ASP.Net MVC
  • Doesn't involve fetching the child.Parent from the database just to make the model validator happy.
  • Doesn't involve adding explicit foreign key (ParentId) to the model.

Is this possible?

share|improve this question
    
why don't you have `ParentId' along w/ Parent. If you map that it can let you insert w/o need to attach/reload and via indexes alone. I'm talking in general. And that might simplify your situation, hierarchies are always a bit tricky. Let me know if interested and I'll put up and answer if you don't know how to do it. –  NSGaga Apr 7 '13 at 23:20
    
I see now that's your pre-condition (my mistake). However, that'd make your life easier. Also that is recommended for other reasons. –  NSGaga Apr 7 '13 at 23:43

3 Answers 3

I think attempting to attach a parent to the child is a little backwards. Typically you would attach a child to a parent. A new parent is being created most likely because you are not including an input element with the parent id in your child model. So when Child child is ModelBound coming into the POST, parent id is probably null. EF sees this and thinks you want to create a new parent too.

Also, since your parentId is part of your route, you don't need to specify it in your view model unless you are doing special things to your Html.BeginForm() in your view. Meaning, if you just use Html.BeginForm, it will post with the same URL values that you sent to the GET request.

Create Method

public ActionResult Create(int parentId) {
        var parent = db.Parents.Find(parentId);
        if (parent == null) {
            return HttpNotFound();
        }
        return View(new Child());
    }

[HttpPost]
[ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
public ActionResult Create(int parentId, Child child)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        //Probably not a bad idea to check again...just to be sure.
        //Especially since we are attaching a child to the parent object anyways.
        var parent = db.Parents.Find(parentId);
        if (parent == null) {
            return HttpNotFound();
        }
        parent.Childern.Add(child);
        db.SaveChanges();
        return RedirectToAction("Index", new { parentId = parentid });
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
"I think attempting to attach a parent to the child is a little backwards. Typically you would attach a child to a parent." I'm attaching a child to the parent. Did I ever say otherwise? –  Ark-kun Apr 7 '13 at 4:14
    
"parent id is probably null. EF sees this and thinks you want to create a new parent too." I'm including the parent id in my form and it comes back correctly. I've explicitly written "The child.Parent was not null and child.Parent.Id was correct". EF algorithm is like this: It checks the child.Parent and sees that it's is not in context; So, EF adds it (like db.Parents.Add(child.Parent)); EF sends the Parent object to the db, trashing the Id because it's auto-generated by the db; EF replaces the correct child.ParentId with the newly created one and sends child to the database. –  Ark-kun Apr 7 '13 at 4:21
    
"parentId is part of your route, you don't need to specify it in your view model" Well, I don't have a view model and the Child shill has the parent id info anyways. –  Ark-kun Apr 7 '13 at 4:26
    
"//Probably not a bad idea to check again...just to be sure." I'm not really understand this. What are we checking for? Do we really need to make another round-trip to the db here? –  Ark-kun Apr 7 '13 at 4:29
    
Have you tried my example to see if it works in your case? I think that there is an issue with you passing the parent Id back and forth between your view and the controller. My //probably not a bad idea to check again comes from the fact that you are trusting what you sent to the view as readonly is coming back unchanged. This is never the case - if you check before you send, you should check again. –  Tommy Apr 7 '13 at 4:45

Here is a link to a full answer to your question. The short answer is, that when you work with disconnected entities, EF will not respect already set entity Ids, and will mark the whole entity graph as new(e.g Added).

I personally don't like it, and simply overrride the SaveChanges(), though it works as below when you have an EnityBase base class with an int(or long) Id property (which I find extremely convenient)

public override int SaveChanges()
{
    this.ChangeTracker.Entries()
        .Where(x => x.Entity is EntityBase && x.State == EntityState.Added && ((EntityBase) x.Entity).Id > 0)
        .ForEach(x => x.State = EntityState.Unchanged);
    return base.SaveChanges();
}
share|improve this answer
    
As I've written, I'm able to overcome the disconnected entities problem by calling .Attach. The main problem is that for a when I added the Required attributes to the Parent properties, the model validation started to fail since only the Id property of the parent is filled. Your link violates the 3rd requirement: "Doesn't involve adding explicit foreign key (ParentId) to the model." –  Ark-kun Dec 15 '13 at 3:56
    
Im sorry, my bad, i managed to reply to the first part of your question, without actually reading the whole thing through (which if i would have, i'd have noticed that you managed to solve that part). –  MBoros Dec 15 '13 at 12:01
    
As for an answer to your real question: how is child.Parent.Name null? Is it not serialized to the client, and then coming back with value in your Create method? Anyways, can't you override the ValidateEntity method of the DBContext? It seems that you want to use the parent without adding or modifying it, as such you can skip validation, no? I would say skipping validation for unchanged entities could make sense here, no? I didn't try it, but just an idea.... –  MBoros Dec 15 '13 at 12:05
    
As I remember: I put parentId into the hidden Parent.Id form input. This results in the creation of the Parent object and setting its Id property (but obviously, none of the other properties). Basically: child = new Child() { Parent = new Parent { Id = parentId } }; –  Ark-kun Dec 16 '13 at 13:15
    
"can't you override the ValidateEntity method of the DBContext?" I think I've tried to control ModelState.IsValid via attributes, but I think I've failed. You're right... Maybe I don't really need that validation. –  Ark-kun Dec 16 '13 at 13:22

Think this should work for Create method:

public ActionResult Create([Bind(Exclude="Parent")]Child child)
share|improve this answer

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