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This compiles:

struct str {};

namespace a
{
    void foo(str s) {}
}
namespace b
{
    void foo(str s) {}

    void bar(str s) { foo(s); }
}
int main(int, char**)
{
    return 0;
}

but this doesn't (with the struct definition moved inside namespace a)

namespace a
{
    struct str {};

    void foo(str s) {}
}
namespace b
{
    void foo(a::str s) {}

    void bar(a::str s) { foo(s); }
}
int main(int, char**)
{
    return 0;
}

The error I get is

bad.cpp: In function ‘void b::bar(a::str)’:
bad.cpp:12: error: call of overloaded ‘foo(a::str&)’ is ambiguous
bad.cpp:10: note: candidates are: void b::foo(a::str)
bad.cpp:5: note:                 void a::foo(a::str)

It seems reasonable to expect that, since a::foo is not in scope, the call to foo can only refer to b::foo. Is there a good reason for compilation to fail (and if so, what is it), or is it a deficiency in the implementations (of both major compilers)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is because of the way name lookup, and in particular Argument-Dependent Lookup (ADL), works. When deciding which functions may be a candidate for resolving your call, the compiler will first look up names in:

  1. The namespace where the function call occurs;
  2. The namespace(s) where the type(s) of the argument(s) is/are defined.

If no function with that name is found in those namespaces, the compiler will proceed inspecting parent namespaces of the namespace where the call is made.


So what is going on in the examples from your question?

In the first case, str is defined in the global namespace, and there is no function called foo() there. However, there is one in the namespace where the call occurs (b): so the compiler has found a valid name, name lookup stops, and overload resolution starts.

But well, there's only one candidate function! So the task is easy here: the compiler invokes b::foo().

In the second case, on the other hand, str is defined in the a namespace, and when calling foo(s), the compiler will again look in the namespace where the call is made (b) and in the namespace where the type of the argument (str) is defined - this time, a.

So now there are two functions with matching names for resolving the call: enter overload resolution! Alas, both functions are equally good (exact matches, no conversion required). Hence, the call is ambiguous.

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