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I am trying to block external networks from initiating a connection to my internal networks for both TCP and UDP. My thought is to use --state. I am uncertain about what man page for different states mean.

"NEW meaning that the packet has started a new connection, or otherwise associated with a connection which has not seen packets in both directions" man page

Does NEW tracks the handshake? As in

client1 -SYN-> client2 NEW
client1 <-SYN,ACK- client2 NEW
client1 -ACK-> client2 ESTABLISHED

-or-

client1 -SYN-> client2 NEW
client1 <-SYN,ACK- client2 NEW
client1 -ACK-> client2 NEW
client1 <-DATA- client2 ESTABLISHED

for UDP

client1 -MSG1-> client2 NEW
client1 <-MSG2- client2 NEW
client1 -MSG3-> client2 ESTABLISHED

-or-

client1 -MSG1-> client2 NEW
client1 <-MSG2- client2 ESTABLISHED

Would this block incoming new connection but let new outgoing connection through?

-A FORWARD -p tcp -m state --state NEW ! -s 192.168.1.0/24 -j DROP
-A FORWARD -p tcp -m state --state ESTABLISHED ! -s 192.168.1.0/24 -j DROP
-A FORWARD -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED -s 192.168.1.0/24 -j ACCEPT
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1 Answer 1

I haven't tested UDP but for TCP as soon as the SYN packet was sent the connection become ESTABLISHED so

client1 -SYN-> client2 NEW
client1 <-SYN-ACK- client2 ESTABLISHED

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