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I have a large array of custom objects which I need to perform independent (parallelizable) tasks on, including modifying object parameters. I've tried using both a Manager().dict, and 'sharedmem'ory, but neither is working. For example:

import numpy as np
import multiprocessing as mp
import sharedmem as shm


class Tester:

    num = 0.0
    name = 'none'
    def __init__(self,tnum=num, tname=name):
        self.num  = tnum
        self.name = tname

    def __str__(self):
        return '%f %s' % (self.num, self.name)

def mod(test, nn):
    test.num = np.random.randn()
    test.name = nn


if __name__ == '__main__':

    num = 10

    tests = np.empty(num, dtype=object)
    for it in range(num):
        tests[it] = Tester(tnum=it*1.0)

    sh_tests = shm.empty(num, dtype=object)
    for it in range(num):
        sh_tests[it] = tests[it]
        print sh_tests[it]

    print '\n'
    workers = [ mp.Process(target=mod, args=(test, 'some') ) for test in sh_tests ]

    for work in workers: work.start()

    for work in workers: work.join()

    for test in sh_tests: print test

prints out:

0.000000 none
1.000000 none
2.000000 none
3.000000 none
4.000000 none
5.000000 none
6.000000 none
7.000000 none
8.000000 none
9.000000 none


0.000000 none
1.000000 none
2.000000 none
3.000000 none
4.000000 none
5.000000 none
6.000000 none
7.000000 none
8.000000 none
9.000000 none

I.e. the objects aren't modified.

How can I achieve the desired behavior?

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can you post a link to sharedmem I can't seem to find anything on it. –  tcaswell Apr 7 '13 at 3:25
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3 Answers

The problem is that when the objects are passed to the worker processes, they are packed up with pickle, shipped to the other process, where they are unpacked and worked on. Your objects aren't so much passed to the other process, as cloned. You don't return the objects, so the cloned object are happily modified, and then thrown away.

It looks like this can not be done (Python: Possible to share in-memory data between 2 separate processes) directly.

What you can do is return the modified objects.

import numpy as np
import multiprocessing as mp



class Tester:

    num = 0.0
    name = 'none'
    def __init__(self,tnum=num, tname=name):
        self.num  = tnum
        self.name = tname

    def __str__(self):
        return '%f %s' % (self.num, self.name)

def mod(test, nn, out_queue):
    print test.num
    test.num = np.random.randn()
    print test.num
    test.name = nn
    out_queue.put(test)




if __name__ == '__main__':       
    num = 10
    out_queue = mp.Queue()
    tests = np.empty(num, dtype=object)
    for it in range(num):
        tests[it] = Tester(tnum=it*1.0)


    print '\n'
    workers = [ mp.Process(target=mod, args=(test, 'some', out_queue) ) for test in tests ]

    for work in workers: work.start()

    for work in workers: work.join()

    res_lst = []
    for j in range(len(workers)):
        res_lst.append(out_queue.get())

    for test in res_lst: print test

This does lead to the interesting observation that because the spawned processes are identical, they all start with the same seed for the random number, so they all generate the same 'random' number.

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I don't see you passing shm references out into the child processes so I don't see how work done by them could be written back into the shared memory. Perhaps I'm missing something here.

Alternatively, have you considered numpy.memmap? (BTW: tcaswell, the module referred to here seems to be:numpy-sharedmem).

Also you might want to read Sturla Molden's Using Python, multiprocessing and NumPy/SciPy for parallel numerical computing(PDF) as recommended in unutbu's answer to [StackOverflow:How do I pass large numpy arrays between python subprocesses without saving to disk?] and (How do I pass large numpy arrays between python subprocesses without saving to disk?). and Joe Kington's StackOverflow: NumPy vs. multiprocessing and mmap.

These might be more inspirational than directly relevant.

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thanks for the pointer. Saw it, but was not sure if it was the right package. –  tcaswell Apr 7 '13 at 5:36
    
+1 for the nice collection of links! –  tcaswell Apr 7 '13 at 5:48
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Your code doesn't try to modify the shared memory. It just clones individual objects.

dtype=object means that sharedmem won't work due to reasons outlined in the link provided by @tcaswell:

sharing of object graphs that include references/pointers to other objects is basically unfeasible

For plain (value) types you can use shared memory, see Use numpy array in shared memory for multiprocessing.

The manager approach should also work (it just copies the objects around):

import random
from multiprocessing import Pool, Manager

class Tester(object):
    def __init__(self, num=0.0, name='none'):
        self.num  = num
        self.name = name

    def __repr__(self):
        return '%s(%r, %r)' % (self.__class__.__name__, self.num, self.name)

def init(L):
    global tests
    tests = L

def modify(i_t_nn):
    i, t, nn = i_t_nn
    t.num += random.normalvariate(mu=0, sigma=1) # modify private copy
    t.name = nn
    tests[i] = t # copy back
    return i

def main():
    num_processes = num = 10 #note: num_processes and num may differ
    manager = Manager()
    tests = manager.list([Tester(num=i) for i in range(num)])
    print(tests[:2])

    args = ((i, t, 'some') for i, t in enumerate(tests))
    pool = Pool(processes=num_processes, initializer=init, initargs=(tests,))
    for i in pool.imap_unordered(modify, args):
        print("done %d" % i)
    pool.close()
    pool.join()
    print(tests[:2])

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
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