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Being able to create and manipulate strings during compile-time in C++ has several useful applications. Although it is possible to create compile-time strings in C++, the process is very cumbersome, as the string needs to be declared as a variadic sequence of characters, e.g.

using str = sequence<'H', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o', ', ', 'w', 'o', 'r', 'l', 'd', '!'>;

Operations such as string concatenation, substring extraction, and many others, can easily be implemented as operations on sequences of characters. Is it possible to declare compile-time strings more conveniently? If not, is there a proposal in the works that would allow for convenient declaration of compile-time strings?

Why Existing Approaches Fail

Ideally, we would like to be able to declare compile-time strings as follows:

// Approach 1
using str1 = sequence<"Hello, world!">;

or, using user-defined literals,

// Approach 2
constexpr auto str2 = "Hello, world!"_s;

where decltype(str2) would have a constexpr constructor. A messier version of approach 1 is possible to implement, taking advantage of the fact that you can do the following:

template <unsigned Size, const char Array[Size]>
struct foo;

However, the array would need to have external linkage, so to get approach 1 to work, we would have to write something like this:

/* Implementation of array to sequence goes here. */

constexpr const char str[] = "Hello, world!";

int main()
{
    using s = string<13, str>;
    return 0;
}

Needless to say, this is very inconvenient. Approach 2 is actually not possible to implement. If we were to declare a (constexpr) literal operator, then how would we specify the return type? Since we need the operator to return a variadic sequence of characters, so we would need to use the const char* parameter to specify the return type:

constexpr auto
operator"" _s(const char* s, size_t n) -> /* Some metafunction using `s` */

This results in a compile error, because s is not a constexpr. Trying to work around this by doing the following does not help much.

template <char... Ts>
constexpr sequence<Ts...> operator"" _s() { return {}; }

The standard dictates that this specific literal operator form is reserved for integer and floating-point types. While 123_s would work, abc_s would not. What if we ditch user-defined literals altogether, and just use a regular constexpr function?

template <unsigned Size>
constexpr auto
string(const char (&array)[Size]) -> /* Some metafunction using `array` */

As before, we run into the problem that the array, now a parameter to the constexpr function, is itself no longer a constexpr type.

I believe it should be possible to define a C preprocessor macro that takes a string and the size of the string as arguments, and returns a sequence consisting of the characters in the string (using BOOST_PP_FOR, stringification, array subscripts, and the like). However, I do not have the time (or enough interest) to implement such a macro =)

share|improve this question
1  
Boost has a macro which defines a string which can be used as a constant expression. Well, it defines a class which has a string member. Did you check that out? –  Pubby Apr 7 '13 at 2:17
    
External linkage is not a requirement anymore for non-type template arguments. In fact, str has internal linkage in your example. (Minor point though, you still can't use string literals.) –  Luc Danton Apr 7 '13 at 2:20
6  
Did you check cpp-next.com/archive/2012/10/… ? –  Evgeny Panasyuk Apr 7 '13 at 2:35
1  
Stack Overflow is not the appropriate place to ask about whether a proposal for something exists. The best place for this would be the C++ site. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 7 '13 at 3:42
1  
Basically, you expand the characters stored in the array/ptr into a parameter pack (like Xeo did). Though they're not split into non-type template arguments, you can use them within constexpr functions and initialize arrays (therefore, concat, substr etc). –  dyp Apr 8 '13 at 11:27

7 Answers 7

up vote 37 down vote accepted

I haven't seen anything to match the elegance of Scott Schurr's str_const presented at C++ Now 2012. It does require constexpr though.

Here's how you can use it, and what it can do:

int
main()
{
    constexpr str_const my_string = "Hello, world!";
    static_assert(my_string.size() == 13, "");
    static_assert(my_string[4] == 'o', "");
    constexpr str_const my_other_string = my_string;
    static_assert(my_string == my_other_string, "");
    constexpr str_const world(my_string, 7, 5);
    static_assert(world == "world", "");
//  constexpr char x = world[5]; // Does not compile because index is out of range!
}

It doesn't get much cooler than compile-time range checking!

Both the use, and the implementation, is free of macros. And there is no artificial limit on string size. I'd post the implementation here, but I'm respecting Scott's implicit copyright. The implementation is on a single slide of his presentation linked to above.

share|improve this answer
    
Also see this blog. And I know I've seen a library already (with append, substr etc.) –  dyp Apr 7 '13 at 15:10
    
<nod> Your StrWrap and Scott's str_const are nearly identical. –  Howard Hinnant Apr 7 '13 at 15:17
2  
Can operations that create new constexpr strings (like string concatenation and substring extraction) work with this approach? Perhaps using two constexpr-string classes (one based on str_const and the other based on sequence), this may be possible. The user would use str_const to initialize the string, but subsequent operations that create new strings would return sequence objects. –  void-pointer Apr 7 '13 at 23:59
1  
This is a good piece of code. However, this approach still have a flaw compared to a string declared with a character sequence as template parameters : a str_const is a constant value, and not a type, thus preventing the use of a lot of metaprogramming idioms. –  JB Jansen May 31 at 18:42
    
The use of constexpr hash function can enable some of them, with possible collisions. Note that implicit type conversions works on constexpr, thus a str_const can be implictily converted to a int (usable as non-type template parameter) if you add a constexpr conversion operator. –  JB Jansen May 31 at 18:47

I believe it should be possible to define a C preprocessor macro that takes a string and the size of the string as arguments, and returns a sequence consisting of the characters in the string (using BOOST_PP_FOR, stringification, array subscripts, and the like). However, I do not have the time (or enough interest) to implement such a macro

it is possible to implement this without relying on boost, using very simple macro and some of C++11 features:

  1. lambdas variadic
  2. templates
  3. generalized constant expressions
  4. non-static data member initializers
  5. uniform initialization

(the latter two are not strictly required here)

  1. we need to be able to instantiate a variadic template with user supplied indicies from 0 to N - a tool also useful for example to expand tuple into variadic template function's argument (see questions: How do I expand a tuple into variadic template function's arguments?
    "unpacking" a tuple to call a matching function pointer)

    namespace  variadic_toolbox
    {
        template<unsigned  count, 
            template<unsigned...> class  meta_functor, unsigned...  indices>
        struct  apply_range
        {
            typedef  typename apply_range<count-1, meta_functor, count-1, indices...>::result  result;
        };
    
        template<template<unsigned...> class  meta_functor, unsigned...  indices>
        struct  apply_range<0, meta_functor, indices...>
        {
            typedef  typename meta_functor<indices...>::result  result;
        };
    }
    
  2. then define a variadic template called string with non-type parameter char:

    namespace  compile_time
    {
        template<char...  str>
        struct  string
        {
            static  constexpr  const char  chars[sizeof...(str)+1] = {str..., '\0'};
        };
    
        template<char...  str>
        constexpr  const char  string<str...>::chars[sizeof...(str)+1];
    }
    
  3. now the most interesting part - to pass character literals into string template:

    namespace  compile_time
    {
        template<typename  lambda_str_type>
        struct  string_builder
        {
            template<unsigned... indices>
            struct  produce
            {
                typedef  string<lambda_str_type{}.chars[indices]...>  result;
            };
        };
    }
    
    #define  CSTRING(string_literal)                                                        \
        []{                                                                                 \
            struct  constexpr_string_type { const char * chars = string_literal; };         \
            return  variadic_toolbox::apply_range<sizeof(string_literal)-1,                 \
                compile_time::string_builder<constexpr_string_type>::produce>::result{};    \
        }()
    

a simple concatenation demonstration shows the usage:

    namespace  compile_time
    {
        template<char...  str0, char...  str1>
        string<str0..., str1...>  operator*(string<str0...>, string<str1...>)
        {
            return  {};
        }
    }

    int main()
    {
        auto  str0 = CSTRING("hello");
        auto  str1 = CSTRING(" world");

        std::cout << "runtime concat: " <<  str_hello.chars  << str_world.chars  << "\n <=> \n";
        std::cout << "compile concat: " <<  (str_hello * str_world).chars  <<  std::endl;
    }

http://liveworkspace.org/code/MyRbM$6

share|improve this answer
    
This is so simple that I still can't believe it works. +1! One thing: shouldn't you use size_t instead of unsigned? –  kirbyfan64sos Dec 10 at 21:27

Edit: as Howard Hinnant (and me somewhat in my comment to the OP) pointed out, you might not need a type whith every single character of the string as a single template argument. If you do need this, there's a macro-free solution below.

There's a trick I found while trying to work with strings at compile time. It requires to introduce another type besides the "template string", but within functions, you can limit the scope of this type.

It doesn't use macros but rather some C++11 features.

#include <iostream>

// helper function
constexpr unsigned c_strlen( char const* str, unsigned count = 0 )
{
    return ('\0' == str[0]) ? count : c_strlen(str+1, count+1);
}

// helper "function" struct
template < char t_c, char... tt_c >
struct rec_print
{
    static void print()
    {
        std::cout << t_c;
        rec_print < tt_c... > :: print ();
    }
};
    template < char t_c >
    struct rec_print < t_c >
    {
        static void print() { std::cout << t_c; }
    };


// destination "template string" type
template < char... tt_c >
struct exploded_string
{
    static void print()
    {
        rec_print < tt_c... > :: print();
    }
};

// struct to explode a `char const*` to an `exploded_string` type
template < typename T_StrProvider, unsigned t_len, char... tt_c >
struct explode_impl
{
    using result =
        typename explode_impl < T_StrProvider, t_len-1,
                                T_StrProvider::str()[t_len-1],
                                tt_c... > :: result;
};

    template < typename T_StrProvider, char... tt_c >
    struct explode_impl < T_StrProvider, 0, tt_c... >
    {
         using result = exploded_string < tt_c... >;
    };

// syntactical sugar
template < typename T_StrProvider >
using explode =
    typename explode_impl < T_StrProvider,
                            c_strlen(T_StrProvider::str()) > :: result;


int main()
{
    // the trick is to introduce a type which provides the string, rather than
    // storing the string itself
    struct my_str_provider
    {
        constexpr static char const* str() { return "hello world"; }
    };

    auto my_str = explode < my_str_provider >{};    // as a variable
    using My_Str = explode < my_str_provider >;    // as a type

    str.print();
}
share|improve this answer

If you dont want use Boost solution you can create simple macro that will do similar thing:

#define MACRO_GET_1(str, i) \
    (sizeof(str) > (i) ? str[(i)] : 0)

#define MACRO_GET_4(str, i) \
    MACRO_GET_1(str, i+0),  \
    MACRO_GET_1(str, i+1),  \
    MACRO_GET_1(str, i+2),  \
    MACRO_GET_1(str, i+3)

#define MACRO_GET_16(str, i) \
    MACRO_GET_4(str, i+0),   \
    MACRO_GET_4(str, i+4),   \
    MACRO_GET_4(str, i+8),   \
    MACRO_GET_4(str, i+12)

#define MACRO_GET_64(str, i) \
    MACRO_GET_16(str, i+0),  \
    MACRO_GET_16(str, i+16), \
    MACRO_GET_16(str, i+32), \
    MACRO_GET_16(str, i+48)

#define MACRO_GET_STR(str) MACRO_GET_64(str, 0), 0 //guard for longer strings

using seq = sequence<MACRO_GET_STR("Hello world!")>;

only problem is fixed size of 64 chars (plus additional zero). But it can be easy changed depending on your needs.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this solution a lot; it's very simple and does the job elegantly. Is it possible to modify the macro so that nothing is appended sizeof(str) > i (instead of appending the extra 0, tokens)? It's easy to define a trim metafunction that will do this after the macro has already been called, but it would be nice if the macro itself could be modified. –  void-pointer Apr 7 '13 at 9:23
    
Is impossible because parser dont understand sizeof(str). Its possible to manually add string size like MACRO_GET_STR(6, "Hello") but this require Boost macros to work because writing it manually require 100 times more code (you need implements simple thing like 1+1). –  Yankes Apr 7 '13 at 10:28

I believe it should be possible to define a C preprocessor macro that takes a string and the size of the string as arguments, and returns a sequence consisting of the characters in the string (using BOOST_PP_FOR, stringification, array subscripts, and the like)

There is article: Using strings in C++ template metaprograms by Abel Sinkovics and Dave Abrahams.

It has some improvement over your idea of using macro + BOOST_PP_REPEAT - it doesn't require passing explicit size to macro. In short, it is based on fixed upper limit for string size and "string overrun protection":

template <int N>
constexpr char at(char const(&s)[N], int i)
{
    return i >= N ? '\0' : s[i];
}

plus conditional boost::mpl::push_back.


I changed my accepted answer to Yankes' solution, since it solves this specific problem, and does so elegantly without the use of constexpr or complex preprocessor code.

If you accept trailing zeros, hand-written macro looping, 2x repetion of string in expanded macro, and don't have Boost - then I agree - it is better. Though, with Boost it would be just three lines:

LIVE DEMO

#include <boost/preprocessor/repetition/repeat.hpp>
#define GET_STR_AUX(_, i, str) (sizeof(str) > (i) ? str[(i)] : 0),
#define GET_STR(str) BOOST_PP_REPEAT(64,GET_STR_AUX,str) 0
share|improve this answer
    
I initially changed the solution to Yankes', since he provided the first working example here. At this point, there's a lot of good competing ideas. It was my mistake in picking an answer so early. I'll currently remark this question as unanswered, and hold off until I get the time to try out the ideas that everyone has posted here. There's a lot of useful information in the answers people have given here... –  void-pointer Apr 8 '13 at 9:53
    
I agree - for instance, I like Howard Hinnant example. –  Evgeny Panasyuk Apr 8 '13 at 13:02

based on idea from Howard Hinnant you can create literal class that will add two literals together.

template<int>
using charDummy = char;

template<int... dummy>
struct F
{
    const char table[sizeof...(dummy) + 1];
    constexpr F(const char* a) : table{ str_at<dummy>(a)..., 0}
    {

    }
    constexpr F(charDummy<dummy>... a) : table{ a..., 0}
    {

    }

    constexpr F(const F& a) : table{ a.table[dummy]..., 0}
    {

    }

    template<int... dummyB>
    constexpr F<dummy..., sizeof...(dummy)+dummyB...> operator+(F<dummyB...> b)
    {
        return { this->table[dummy]..., b.table[dummyB]... };
    }
};

template<int I>
struct get_string
{
    constexpr static auto g(const char* a) -> decltype( get_string<I-1>::g(a) + F<0>(a + I))
    {
        return get_string<I-1>::g(a) + F<0>(a + I);
    }
};

template<>
struct get_string<0>
{
    constexpr static F<0> g(const char* a)
    {
        return {a};
    }
};

template<int I>
constexpr auto make_string(const char (&a)[I]) -> decltype( get_string<I-2>::g(a) )
{
    return get_string<I-2>::g(a);
}

constexpr auto a = make_string("abc");
constexpr auto b = a+ make_string("def"); // b.table == "abcdef" 
share|improve this answer

A colleague challenged me to concatenate strings in memory at compile-time. It includes instantiating individual strings at compile-time as well. The full code listing is here:

//Arrange strings contiguously in memory at compile-time from string literals.
//All free functions prefixed with "my" to faciliate grepping the symbol tree
//(none of them should show up).

#include <iostream>

using std::size_t;

//wrapper for const char* to "allocate" space for it at compile-time
template<size_t N>
struct String {
    //C arrays can only be initialised with a comma-delimited list
    //of values in curly braces. Good thing the compiler expands
    //parameter packs into comma-delimited lists. Now we just have
    //to get a parameter pack of char into the constructor.
    template<typename... Args>
    constexpr String(Args... args):_str{ args... } { }
    const char _str[N];
};

//takes variadic number of chars, creates String object from it.
//i.e. myMakeStringFromChars('f', 'o', 'o', '\0') -> String<4>::_str = "foo"
template<typename... Args>
constexpr auto myMakeStringFromChars(Args... args) -> String<sizeof...(Args)> {
    return String<sizeof...(args)>(args...);
}

//This struct is here just because the iteration is going up instead of
//down. The solution was to mix traditional template metaprogramming
//with constexpr to be able to terminate the recursion since the template
//parameter N is needed in order to return the right-sized String<N>.
//This class exists only to dispatch on the recursion being finished or not.
//The default below continues recursion.
template<bool TERMINATE>
struct RecurseOrStop {
    template<size_t N, size_t I, typename... Args>
    static constexpr String<N> recurseOrStop(const char* str, Args... args);
};

//Specialisation to terminate recursion when all characters have been
//stripped from the string and converted to a variadic template parameter pack.
template<>
struct RecurseOrStop<true> {
    template<size_t N, size_t I, typename... Args>
    static constexpr String<N> recurseOrStop(const char* str, Args... args);
};

//Actual function to recurse over the string and turn it into a variadic
//parameter list of characters.
//Named differently to avoid infinite recursion.
template<size_t N, size_t I = 0, typename... Args>
constexpr String<N> myRecurseOrStop(const char* str, Args... args) {
    //template needed after :: since the compiler needs to distinguish
    //between recurseOrStop being a function template with 2 paramaters
    //or an enum being compared to N (recurseOrStop < N)
    return RecurseOrStop<I == N>::template recurseOrStop<N, I>(str, args...);
}

//implementation of the declaration above
//add a character to the end of the parameter pack and recurse to next character.
template<bool TERMINATE>
template<size_t N, size_t I, typename... Args>
constexpr String<N> RecurseOrStop<TERMINATE>::recurseOrStop(const char* str,
                                                            Args... args) {
    return myRecurseOrStop<N, I + 1>(str, args..., str[I]);
}

//implementation of the declaration above
//terminate recursion and construct string from full list of characters.
template<size_t N, size_t I, typename... Args>
constexpr String<N> RecurseOrStop<true>::recurseOrStop(const char* str,
                                                       Args... args) {
    return myMakeStringFromChars(args...);
}

//takes a compile-time static string literal and returns String<N> from it
//this happens by transforming the string literal into a variadic paramater
//pack of char.
//i.e. myMakeString("foo") -> calls myMakeStringFromChars('f', 'o', 'o', '\0');
template<size_t N>
constexpr String<N> myMakeString(const char (&str)[N]) {
    return myRecurseOrStop<N>(str);
}

//Simple tuple implementation. The only reason std::tuple isn't being used
//is because its only constexpr constructor is the default constructor.
//We need a constexpr constructor to be able to do compile-time shenanigans,
//and it's easier to roll our own tuple than to edit the standard library code.

//use MyTupleLeaf to construct MyTuple and make sure the order in memory
//is the same as the order of the variadic parameter pack passed to MyTuple.
template<typename T>
struct MyTupleLeaf {
    constexpr MyTupleLeaf(T value):_value(value) { }
    T _value;
};

//Use MyTupleLeaf implementation to define MyTuple.
//Won't work if used with 2 String<> objects of the same size but this
//is just a toy implementation anyway. Multiple inheritance guarantees
//data in the same order in memory as the variadic parameters.
template<typename... Args>
struct MyTuple: public MyTupleLeaf<Args>... {
    constexpr MyTuple(Args... args):MyTupleLeaf<Args>(args)... { }
};

//Helper function akin to std::make_tuple. Needed since functions can deduce
//types from parameter values, but classes can't.
template<typename... Args>
constexpr MyTuple<Args...> myMakeTuple(Args... args) {
    return MyTuple<Args...>(args...);
}

//Takes a variadic list of string literals and returns a tuple of String<> objects.
//These will be contiguous in memory. Trailing '\0' adds 1 to the size of each string.
//i.e. ("foo", "foobar") -> (const char (&arg1)[4], const char (&arg2)[7]) params ->
//                       ->  MyTuple<String<4>, String<7>> return value
template<size_t... Sizes>
constexpr auto myMakeStrings(const char (&...args)[Sizes]) -> MyTuple<String<Sizes>...> {
    //expands into myMakeTuple(myMakeString(arg1), myMakeString(arg2), ...)
    return myMakeTuple(myMakeString(args)...);
}

//Prints tuple of strings
template<typename T> //just to avoid typing the tuple type of the strings param
void printStrings(const T& strings) {
    //No std::get or any other helpers for MyTuple, so intead just cast it to
    //const char* to explore its layout in memory. We could add iterators to
    //myTuple and do "for(auto data: strings)" for ease of use, but the whole
    //point of this exercise is the memory layout and nothing makes that clearer
    //than the ugly cast below.
    const char* const chars = reinterpret_cast<const char*>(&strings);
    std::cout << "Printing strings of total size " << sizeof(strings);
    std::cout << " bytes:\n";
    std::cout << "-------------------------------\n";

    for(size_t i = 0; i < sizeof(strings); ++i) {
        chars[i] == '\0' ? std::cout << "\n" : std::cout << chars[i];
    }

    std::cout << "-------------------------------\n";
    std::cout << "\n\n";
}

int main() {
    {
        constexpr auto strings = myMakeStrings("foo", "foobar",
                                               "strings at compile time");
        printStrings(strings);
    }

    {
        constexpr auto strings = myMakeStrings("Some more strings",
                                               "just to show Jeff to not try",
                                               "to challenge C++11 again :P",
                                               "with more",
                                               "to show this is variadic");
        printStrings(strings);
    }

    std::cout << "Running 'objdump -t |grep my' should show that none of the\n";
    std::cout << "functions defined in this file (except printStrings()) are in\n";
    std::cout << "the executable. All computations are done by the compiler at\n";
    std::cout << "compile-time. printStrings() executes at run-time.\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
You sure it is done at compile time? There's been a discussion about this some time ago, and to me, the result is not clear. –  dyp Apr 9 '13 at 17:23
    
Running objdump -t a.out |grep my finds nothing. When I started typing this code I kept experimenting with removing constexpr from the functions and objdump showed them when constexpr was omitted. I'm 99.9% confident it happens at compile time. –  Átila Neves Apr 10 '13 at 7:11
    
If you look at the disassembly (-S), you'll notice that gcc (4.7.2) does indeed resolve the constexpr functions at compile-time. Yet, the strings are not assembled at compile-time. Rather, (if I interpret it correctly) for each char of those "assembled" strings, there's an own movb operation, which is arguably the optimization you were looking for. –  dyp Apr 10 '13 at 12:45
1  
That's true. I tried again with gcc 4.9 and it still does the same thing. I always thought this was the compiler being stupid though.Only yesterday did I think to try a different compiler. With clang, the bytewise movs aren't there at all. With gcc, -Os gets rid of them too, but -O3 does the same thing. –  Átila Neves May 26 at 12:50

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