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I have some text files with two columns. first column is the position of amino acids and the second column is the name of amino acids.I would like to get the total number of each amino acids from all files. I need only unique values. In the following example, total no:of LEU is 2 (one from file1 and the other from file2). Your suggestions would be appreciated!

file1

54   LEU
54   LEU
78   VAL
112  ALA
78   VAL

file 2

54   LEU
113  ALA
113  ALA
12   ALA
112  ALA

desired output

total no:of LEU - 2
total no:of VAL - 1
total no:of ALA - 4
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closed as not a real question by Wooble, Andy Hayden, Rachel Gallen, nneonneo, Firoze Lafeer Apr 8 '13 at 1:53

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
What have you tried so far? –  Joel Cornett Apr 7 '13 at 4:00

9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you only have two files, just use awk:

awk '{ a[$2]++ } END { for (i in a) print "total no:of", i, a[i] }' <(awk '!a[$1,$2]++' file1) <(awk '!a[$1,$2]++' file2)

If you have many, many files, try this awk script. Run like:

awk -f script.awk file{1..200}

Contents of script.awk:

{
    a[FILENAME,$1,$2]
}

END {
    for (i in a) {
        split (i,x,SUBSEP)
        b[x[3]]++
    }
    for (j in b) {
        print "total no:of", j, b[j]
    }
}

Alternatively, here's the one-liner:

awk '{ a[FILENAME,$1,$2] } END { for (i in a) { split (i,x,SUBSEP); b[x[3]]++ } for (j in b) print "total no:of", j, b[j] }' file{1..200}

Results:

total no:of LEU 2
total no:of ALA 4
total no:of VAL 1
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. I have 200 files.Are there any methods in awk for 200 files? –  user2253688 Apr 7 '13 at 5:12
    
@user2253688: Yes there is. Please see the update. HTH. –  Steve Apr 7 '13 at 5:38
1  
Thank you very much for your help. –  user2253688 Apr 7 '13 at 5:43

open the file, read a line, get the name of protien, if it exists in dictionary, add 1 to it or else append it to dictionary.

protien_dict = {}
openfile = open(filename)
while True:
    line = openfile.readline()
    if line = "":
            break
    values = line.split(" ")
    if protien_dict.has_key(values[1]):
        protien_dict[values[1]] = protien_dict[values[1]] + 1
    else:
        protien_dict[values[1]] = 1
for elem in protien_dict:
    print "total no. of " + elem + " = " + protien_dict[elem]
share|improve this answer
    
while True: you need a break statement or you get an infinite loop. –  Rushy Panchal Apr 7 '13 at 4:12
name_dict = {}
for filename in filenames:
    fsock = open(filename, 'r')
    lines = fsock.readlines()
    fsock.close()
    for line in lines:
        a = line.split()
        key = a[-1]
        if name_dict[key]:
            name_dict[key] += 1 
        else:
            name_dict[key] = 1

for i in name_dict.items():
    print "total no:of ", i[0], " - ", i[1]
share|improve this answer
    
It's bad practice to name a variable, even for an iterator, after a built-in (file). –  Rushy Panchal Apr 7 '13 at 4:07
    
I edit it, thanks for your advice –  Roger Liu Apr 7 '13 at 4:12

collections.Counter is particularly useful for--you guessed it!--counting things!:

from collections import Counter
counts = Counter()
for filename in filenames:
    with open(filename) as f:
        counts.update(set(tuple(line.split()) for line in f if line.strip()))
share|improve this answer

You mentioned Python, Perl and Awk.

In all three, the idea would be the same: Using a hash to store the values.

Hashes are like arrays, except each entry is indexed with a key and not the location. In a hash, there can only be a single entry with that key. Because of this, hashes are used to check if values have appeared before. Here's a quick Perl example:

my %value_hash;
for my $value ( qw(one two three one three four) ) {
    if ( exists $value_hash{$value} ) {
       print "I've seen the value $value before\n";
    }
    else {
       print "The value of $value is new\n";
       $value_hash{$value} = 1;
    }
}

This will print out:

The value of one is new
The value of two is new
The value of three is new
I've seen the value of one before
I've seen the value of three before
The value of four is new

First, you need two loops: One to loop through all of your files, and another to loop through each line of a particular file.

for my $file_name ( @file_list ) {
    open my $file_fh, "<", $file_name 
       or die qw(File $file_name doesn't exist);
    while (my $line = <$file_fh>) {
       chomp $line;
       ...
    }
}

Next, we'll introduce a hash for totals of each amino acid and a tracking hash for those amino acids:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my %total_amino_acids;
my @file_list = qw(file1 file2);   #Your list of files

for my $file_name ( @file_list ) {
    open my $file_fh, "<", $file_name; 
    my %seen_amino_acid_before;  # "Initialize" hash which tracks seen
    while (my $line = <$file_fh>) {
       chomp $line;
       my ( $location, $amino_acid ) = split $line;
       if ( not %seen_amino_acid_before{$amino_acid} ) {
           $total_amino_acids{$amino_acid} += 1;
       }
    }
}

Now, I'm assuming that when you said unique, you were talking about only the amino acid and not the position. The split is splitting the two values, and I'm only looking at the amino acid. If position is also important, you would have to include that in the key of th %seen_amino_acid_before hash. This is tricky because I could imagine the following:

54    LEU
54 LEU
054.00  LEU

These are different strings, but all have the same information. You'd want to make sure that you standardize the position/amino acid key.

    while (my $line = <$file_fh>) {
       chomp $line;
       my ( $location, $amino_acid ) = split $line;
       my $amino_acid_key = sprinf "%04d-%s", $location, uc $amino_acid;
       if ( not %seen_amino_acid_before{$amino_acid_key} ) {
           $total_amino_acids{$amino_acid} += 1;
       }
    }

In the above, I'm creating an $amino_acid_key. I use sprintf to format my numeric portion to be zero filled decimal and the amino acid to be uppercase. This way:

54    LEU
54 leu
054.00  Leu

would all be the key 0054-LEU. That way, the way your data is entered in your file isn't affecting your results. This may be a completely unnecessary step, but something you should always considered. For example, if your data is computer generated, this probably isn't an issue. If your data is entered by a bunch of over worked grad-students in the middle of the night, you probably need to worry about the format.

Now, all you need is a loop to read your data:

for my $amino_acid ( sort keys %total_amino_acids ) {
     printf "total no:of %4s - %4d\n", $amino_acid, $total_amino_acids{$amino_acid};
}

Notice I used printf to help format the totals, so they'll be lined up.

share|improve this answer

Another option:

use strict;
use warnings;

my ( $argv, %hash, %seen ) = '';

while (<>) {
    $argv ne $ARGV and $argv = $ARGV and undef %seen;
    !$seen{ $1 . $2 }++ and $hash{$2}++ if /(.+)\s+(.+)/;
}

print "total no:of $_ - $hash{$_}\n" for keys %hash;

Output on your datasets:

total no:of ALA - 4
total no:of VAL - 1
total no:of LEU - 2
share|improve this answer

Just perl oneliner:

perl -anE'$h{$F[1]}++}{say"total no:of $_ - $h{$_}"for keys%h'
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ls file* | parallel 'sort -u {}  >> tmp' ; awk '{print $2}' tmp | sort | uniq -c

this gives output as :

4 ALA

2 LEU

1 VAL

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with open('file1.txt', 'r') as f1, open('file2.txt', 'r') as f2:
    # open both files, then close afterwards
    data = f1.readlines().split() + f2.readlines.split()
    # read the data, then split it by spaces
d = {elem:data.count(elem) for elem in set(data[0::2])}
for i in d:
    print('total no:of {} - {}'.format(i, d[i]))
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