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SELECT LASTNAME, STATE, COUNT(*) 
FROM TEST 
WHERE STATE IN ('NY','NJ','CA')
GROUP BY STATE,LASTNAME
HAVING COUNT(*)>1;

Similar query in MS SQL server and Sybase used to process internally as follows,

On Test table where clause is applied and resultset(internal table) is made, then a group by is applied and another internal resultset is made and then finally Having is applied and final result set is shown to the user.

Does Oracle use the resultset approach as well or is it something different?

By the way I tried to Google around, checked Oracle documentation, couldn't find the detail I was looking for. Sybase documentation is pretty clear on such things.

share|improve this question
    
Are you looking for query plan? If so, here is the documentation –  Fergus Apr 7 '13 at 4:39
    
I know how to get query plan. I am just looking for simple explanation if oracle uses resultsets (intermediate tables) to get to the final result set or is it using some other method. –  MS Stp Apr 7 '13 at 4:46
    
Something new for me I guess...can you please direct me in Sybase documentation what you are looking for? –  Fergus Apr 7 '13 at 4:52
    
    
check page 244. Although this is Sybase 9 but this is the one I use most. –  MS Stp Apr 7 '13 at 5:01

1 Answer 1

You can count on Oracle to materialize the result set in this case. To be sure, check the plan. I'm betting you will find a hash group by and then a filter operation at the top.

There may be some rare variations of your case that could be solved by walking a suitable index in order to avoid the intermediate result set, but I have never come across it in an execution plan.

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Thanks I am reading into it. –  MS Stp Apr 9 '13 at 12:57

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