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I have a problem where my CSS is not taking effect (in Chrome), and I think there is some conflict with Twitter Bootstrap.

input.ng-invalid {
    border-color: red;
    outline-color: red;
}

My pattern is defined in my controller as:

$scope.hexPattern = /^[0-9A-Fa-f]+$/;

And copying the HTML from the live DOM, I see that both ng-invalid and ng-invalid-pattern are set, so my ng-pattern must be working.

<div class="control-group">
    <label class="control-label" for="salt">Salt: </label>
    <div class="controls">
        <input type="text" id="salt" ng-model="salt" ng-pattern="hexPattern" class="ng-dirty ng-invalid ng-invalid-pattern">
    </div>
</div>

I see that in the "Validation states" section of the Forms section of Twitter Bootstrap Base CSS, I see I need to add the error class to the control-group div.

<div class="control-group error">

Question: How to set the class=error based on the child input class=ng-invalid? Can this be done with some soft of ng-class expression? Can I set this via code in the controller? Is there a way to ".$watch" the pattern evaluation like property changes? Any other ideas to get my "red" outline?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You can easily do it with ng-class directive:

<form name="myForm">
  <div class="control-group" ng-class="{ error: myForm.salt.$invalid }">
    <label class="control-label" for="salt">Salt: </label>
    <div class="controls">
      <input type="text" name="salt" ng-model="salt" ng-pattern="hexPattern">
    </div>
  </div>
</form>

http://plnkr.co/edit/RihsxA?p=preview

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1  
This worked for me once I added name="salt" instead of just id="salt" –  Kevin Hakanson Apr 7 '13 at 13:04
    
For me too, I had to add the name="" attribute for this to work. –  Ciwan Nov 23 '13 at 21:27
    
This didn't work for me and I'm not sure why. Has this changed some how with the newest version of AngularJS? –  Drellgor Feb 3 '14 at 22:19
3  
Figured it out. Bootstrap's class name is "has-error". The dash caused a javascript error so I had to wrap it in single quotes. –  Drellgor Feb 3 '14 at 23:25
    
Note: In the attribute ng-class="{ error: myForm.salt.$invalid }", the salt term is a reference to the input with name="salt", not the ng-model. –  Jesse Webb Mar 3 '14 at 9:31

I think a better solution is to just add your own CSS rules. It makes the code much simpler and, as a bonus, you can set the rule to only apply to "dirty" elements. That way fields will only be highlighted after the user has tried to enter something.

In my application I've just added this css, based on an example in the AngularJS forms documentation.

/* Forms */
.ng-invalid.ng-dirty {
  border-color: red;
  outline-color: red;
}
.ng-valid.ng-dirty {
  border-color: green;
  outline-color: green;
}
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